Riding on the balls of your feet. Strait line braking.

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7/7/2018 6:44 PM

I hear and see a lot of guys riding near there toes. Every practice I end with several laps all standing and on the balls of my feet. Do you guys do this? Any explanation.

Im coming off of a 2 stroke ride and I am used to coming into turns ruts wide or sliding in and over the front. Im feeling a lot better on the 450 coming into turns very strait and I see tomac taking very direct lines in and using the rut as a barrier to stop. How do yall guys enter rutted turns?

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7/8/2018 6:25 AM

These guys don't ride ,they just bitch about things to do with riding.

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7/8/2018 12:58 PM

I ride on the balls of my feet in rough sections like sand rollers. That's it really. Everywhere else requires braking and shifting.

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7/8/2018 2:31 PM

move your feet? They aren’t bolted to the bike. I don’t know why everyone wants to have this argument all the time. Flat landings, get on your heels. Rollers, braking bumps, get on your toes. Turns, midfoot with toe pointed down (only touching front rim of peg).

Just ride the bike and move with it.

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7/9/2018 3:59 PM

What about weighing the pegs? Do yall pit weight on the outside every turn or just rough sweepers. I am standing a lot now days but it is rare that I take a turn or sweeper standing.

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7/9/2018 3:59 PM

No one on vital actually cares about riding.

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7/9/2018 4:06 PM

jsmi33966 wrote:

No one on vital actually cares about riding.

How do you hear guys riding near there [sic] toes? There has been an issue lately of people posting insanely stupid questions just to try to get responses, and most are responded to with "much ty". My guess is your post qualified. Much ty.

Yes, weight (not weigh) your outside peg in corners.

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7/9/2018 4:23 PM

jsmi33966 wrote:

No one on vital actually cares about riding.

GrapeApe wrote:

How do you hear guys riding near there [sic] toes? There has been an issue lately of people posting insanely stupid questions just to try to get responses, and most are responded to with "much ty". My guess is your post qualified. Much ty.

Yes, weight (not weigh) your outside peg in corners.

I dont know what "much ty" means. Much thank you?

I think if the turn is not rough just keep your weight even over the seat pegs and bars. If it is rough put some power in your outside peg to act like another shock.

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7/9/2018 5:04 PM

Always ride on your toes with your toes pointed in yes. Squeeze with your feet and your knees will follow.

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7/9/2018 5:19 PM

TheGetFresh wrote:

move your feet? They aren’t bolted to the bike. I don’t know why everyone wants to have this argument all the time. Flat landings, get on your heels. Rollers, braking bumps, get on your toes. Turns, midfoot with toe pointed down (only touching front rim of peg).

Just ride the bike and move with it.

Good advice! Agree. Feet movement is fluid. It's also instinctive after awhile. The top riders, hell even LL riders are not thinking about their feet placement. It's all about feel and instincts after riding and racing thousands of laps.

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7/9/2018 5:32 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/9/2018 5:33 PM

But my feet don't have balls?

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7/9/2018 5:33 PM

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7/9/2018 6:49 PM

jsmi33966 wrote:

What about weighing the pegs? Do yall pit weight on the outside every turn or just rough sweepers. I am standing a lot now days but it is rare that I take a turn or sweeper standing.

You'll always be weighting the outside peg whether you realize it or not.

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7/9/2018 7:02 PM

Go ride in the forest with roots everwhere, you'll soon learn to ride on the balls of yr feet.

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Riding is Freedom, Freedom is Riding!

7/9/2018 7:34 PM

fox1nz wrote:

Go ride in the forest with roots everwhere, you'll soon learn to ride on the balls of yr feet.

Or rocks....

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

7/9/2018 9:44 PM

Man, I wish I could do this!! Bad habits learned when I started riding eons ago, combined with
longish legs and size 13 boots and I have a new technique - riding on the HEELS of your feet!!
laughing laughing laughing laughing

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7/9/2018 10:09 PM

FWYT wrote:

Man, I wish I could do this!! Bad habits learned when I started riding eons ago, combined with
longish legs and size 13 boots and I have a new technique - riding on the HEELS of your feet!!
laughing laughing laughing laughing

All the more reason to keep those big hoofs away from the ground.

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Riding is Freedom, Freedom is Riding!

7/10/2018 10:43 AM

Can you clip-in? Similiar to a bicycle?

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7/10/2018 12:46 PM

fox1nz wrote:

Go ride in the forest with roots everwhere, you'll soon learn to ride on the balls of yr feet.

That is no shit right there....when you need to be navigating roots/rocks....nuts on your feet help !!!

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7/10/2018 1:51 PM

I just spent this past weekend with my kid training with Ryno, Colleen Millsaps, Robbie Reynard, and several others. One thing they said over and over and over was how important foot position is. Ride on the balls of your feet, feet tight against the frame, knees tight against the sides, hips over your ankles, head over the bars, back flat, loose arms. What we were being told was move your feet up for shifting and braking, but then go right back on the balls of your feet.
We worked on this over and over again in and out of ruts, it makes a difference. They also said when weighting the outside peg to press down with your heel, it helps load the suspension and create traction.
Don't believe me, get your bike off the stand and on the ground. Just standing beside the bike put a foot on the peg, get on the ball of your foot and press down with your heel, the bike will move down in the rear. I was skeptical of the technique until I saw it first hand.

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7/10/2018 3:26 PM

FWYT wrote:

Man, I wish I could do this!! Bad habits learned when I started riding eons ago, combined with
longish legs and size 13 boots and I have a new technique - riding on the HEELS of your feet!!
laughing laughing laughing laughing

My knees feel your pain. Us guys with bigger feet need to be concerned about this technique the most, yet it's the most difficult for us to get those big feet and legs up out of the way in corners.

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