Removing Brake Pedal?

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6/24/2019 9:42 AM

After almost 3 years off the bike I decided it was time to get back at it! Picked up a YZ250F a few weeks ago and hit the track this past weekend. Shewww I missed it and can't wait to get back out there ASAP.

I was reminded of one of my old habits and I need to break it sooner than later. On right handers I'm super tentative to take my foot off the brake pedal. I leave it there way too long and my positioning as I enter the turn suffers. I've heard of people taking the pedal off for a while to get away from relying on the rear brake so much. Has anyone has any success with this method? Any other words of advice?

BTW, absolutely love the bike. Kind of miss the power of my old YZ250 but I can tell I'm much smoother and won't tire out as fast.

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6/24/2019 9:54 AM

not a good idea when you really need to stop. Just keep practicing no using it into the turn until it becomes a habit. I had that habit as well and took a little bit.
I started off by letting off sooner and rolling into the turn and got used to carrying more speed in, then I started using the rear brake to slow me down to what I got used to and in time, I got faster into the turns.

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6/24/2019 10:04 AM

Taking the rear pedal off was how my dad conditioned me to start using the front brake more when I got on 60's. Definitely effective regarding breaking the mental barrier of grabbing your front brake with enough force to slow you down. Helps to drill in your working memory the effectiveness of the front brake. Would definitely restrict using such a method for backyard/local tracks. A couple of 10-minute sessions on a turn track where you're forced to use your front brake will help tremendously down the road.

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6/24/2019 10:22 AM

Another option is just adjust it to the lowest setting so you have to push the pedal really far to work it. At least then you still have an option if the poo hits the fan.

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6/24/2019 11:18 AM

I saw a video by ryno where he talked about slowing up early to gain a lot more out of the corner. Everytime i ride i think about slowing up early to set up really good for the corner, and then im able to gas it all the way out. It feels really smooth and it saves way more energy than slamming into the rut and instantly gassing it while hanging off the side of the bike.

He said something like slow up 10 feet to make up 50 feet after the turn.

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6/24/2019 11:37 AM

kb228 wrote:

I saw a video by ryno where he talked about slowing up early to gain a lot more out of the corner. Everytime i ride i think about slowing up early to set up really good for the corner, and then im able to gas it all the way out. It feels really smooth and it saves way more energy than slamming into the rut and instantly gassing it while hanging off the side of the bike.

He said something like slow up 10 feet to make up 50 feet after the turn.

That's a really good point. I think I need to slow down earlier as opposed to still being on the brakes a third of the way through the turn.

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6/24/2019 1:47 PM

focus on riding on the balls of your feet. when your feet are in the correct position you almost can't reach the brake pedal as easy and then won't hit it on accident anymore.

i struggle with my feet being all over the place, reminding myself of the correct position helps

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6/25/2019 1:16 AM

I am the opposite- I could take my rear brake off and throw it away. Not that it is a good thing, but I rarely ever use my rear brake. My big old size 11's tend to modulate it poorly (ie lock it right up), so I run it way low, with the teeth smoothed down, and rarely use it. Wish I could use it better, and on the opposite side, I hammer through front pads like no ones business! LOL!

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6/25/2019 4:17 AM

ridinbeast932 wrote:

After almost 3 years off the bike I decided it was time to get back at it! Picked up a YZ250F a few weeks ago and hit the track this past weekend. Shewww I missed it and can't wait to get back out there ASAP.

I was reminded of one of my old habits and I need to break it sooner than later. On right handers I'm super tentative to take my foot off the brake pedal. I leave it there way too long and my positioning as I enter the turn suffers. I've heard of people taking the pedal off for a while to get away from relying on the rear brake so much. Has anyone has any success with this method? Any other words of advice?

BTW, absolutely love the bike. Kind of miss the power of my old YZ250 but I can tell I'm much smoother and won't tire out as fast.

Photo

Hannah once said if you aren't using the front brake-you are really handicapping(or something like that) your racing. We all know about taking the seat off to force you to stand up more. Bayle was a famous rear brake abuser.

I like left hand turns more than right. But that makes it hard to shift. What to do? Well, you make sure you are in the proper gear. I think the key is to make sure you are braking at the proper times, then taking your foot off the peg or feet positioning will be a non-event.

Don't take the pedal off. It's there for a good reason. Use it, then finish the turn. Straights and turns.

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6/25/2019 6:53 AM

setup a small circle track and spend hours going around it

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6/25/2019 8:28 AM

Remove? Sounds to me like you need to add a brake! smile

Left Hand Rear Brake

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6/25/2019 2:37 PM

Go and do a road race school on a track day to see what braking can be if you get a chance.

You brake while the bike is straight up and down and then you let off and tilt in to the apex and gas it 100% as soon as you see day light for the next straight.

You only trail brake if your calculation is off to suck down the forks so the bike will turn tighter to prevent a run off.

Some times you need to slow down to go fast. Taking the peddle off makes no sense as you need 100% of your brakes if you are doing it right.

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6/26/2019 4:40 AM

scrallex wrote:

Taking the rear pedal off was how my dad conditioned me to start using the front brake more when I got on 60's. Definitely effective regarding breaking the mental barrier of grabbing your front brake with enough force to slow you down. Helps to drill in your working memory the effectiveness of the front brake. Would definitely restrict using such a method for backyard/local tracks. A couple of 10-minute sessions on a turn track where you're forced to use your front brake will help tremendously down the road.

Just the same for me in the old days.
No seat, no rear pedal.
I absolutely hated it...
And it was VERY efficient.
Wouldn't do that on a "real" track among other guys, though.

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6/26/2019 5:03 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/26/2019 5:04 AM

scrallex wrote:

Taking the rear pedal off was how my dad conditioned me to start using the front brake more when I got on 60's. Definitely effective regarding breaking the mental barrier of grabbing your front brake with enough force to slow you down. Helps to drill in your working memory the effectiveness of the front brake. Would definitely restrict using such a method for backyard/local tracks. A couple of 10-minute sessions on a turn track where you're forced to use your front brake will help tremendously down the road.

GODZILLA wrote:

Just the same for me in the old days.
No seat, no rear pedal.
I absolutely hated it...
And it was VERY efficient.
Wouldn't do that on a "real" track among other guys, though.

No seat was one we used as well... sure was hell on air filters though.

I heard stories about a dad who tied his son's feet to the pegs and sent him out into a muddy field to learn to keep his feet on the pegs in mud. Interestingly enough, this "kid" was one of the best mud racers I've ever seen. Always wondered if that was a true story.

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