Question for dealers re: security

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1/16/2018 7:41 AM

I'm curious how many of you dealers use some sort of vehicle security device like SPOT or LoJack on your bikes? If not, why not?

With how many videos we see out there of thieves easily breaking into and stealing bikes, I'm surprised more isn't being done. Is it just not worth the cost of these systems? Do they not work as advertised?

Just curious.

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1/16/2018 7:58 AM

and what's the alarm code to your property? is it complicated or just your DOB?

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1/16/2018 8:05 AM

We are not, as it isn't very cost effective. A decent GPS tracker that actually works is about $500 and Lojack does not have anything for motorcycles yet since they cut that product line a few years back. You can multiply that by however large your inventory is and it gets up there. Plus, theres not a lot of places to hide a GPS device on a dirtbike that isnt easily spotted. The deductible on the insurance policy is less most of the time. We just use preventative measures. We've learned over the last few break-ins how to better deter. Almost every dealer in Houston has been hit multiple times over the past year by the same people. You can even see them wearing the same clothes in different surveillance video. We were hit prior to this current string by a different group of ethnicities, but everyone else has been hit by the wheelie boys where we have not. The point is to make it so difficult that they just turn away and so far that has worked. They can get in and they can get some bikes if they wanted, but the hassle they would have to go through in order to make a quick getaway is multiplied. We've made each stage as much of a hassle as we can such as entry, retrieval and exit as well as upgraded the security. We like to think that it's working, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time.

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1/16/2018 9:01 AM

Thanks 40acres.

Yeah, $500 per device seems very high, especially if you've got 50-100 vehicles in your showroom.

I thought LoJack still supported motorcycle trackers, guess I was wrong. What trackers have you seen or heard of that actually work?

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1/16/2018 9:07 AM

40acres wrote:

We are not, as it isn't very cost effective. A decent GPS tracker that actually works is about $500 and Lojack does not have anything for motorcycles yet since they cut that product line a few years back. You can multiply that by however large your inventory is and it gets up there. Plus, theres not a lot of places to hide a GPS device on a dirtbike that isnt easily spotted. The deductible on the insurance policy is less most of the time. We just use preventative measures. We've learned over the last few break-ins how to better deter. Almost every dealer in Houston has been hit multiple times over the past year by the same people. You can even see them wearing the same clothes in different surveillance video. We were hit prior to this current string by a different group of ethnicities, but everyone else has been hit by the wheelie boys where we have not. The point is to make it so difficult that they just turn away and so far that has worked. They can get in and they can get some bikes if they wanted, but the hassle they would have to go through in order to make a quick getaway is multiplied. We've made each stage as much of a hassle as we can such as entry, retrieval and exit as well as upgraded the security. We like to think that it's working, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time.

What about the coin size units. Pretty cheap and monthly dues not that much no?

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1/16/2018 9:29 AM

I cannot recall the brand We sell at the moment, I'm not in the parts department so I usually defer to them. I do know it retails for $600 with a dealer cost of about $550. The small trackers pose a problem of monthly costs and you have to be within a certain range to ping it. If the bike is stolen, it can't really be tracked unless you're within range. I'm sure there are some out there that are ok but it just isn't cost effective for the amount of inventory we have.

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1/16/2018 10:01 AM

Would it be cost effective to invest in a couple good GPS trackers, do your best to hide it on just 1 or 2 bikes, and then strategically stage those particular bikes to be the easiest to take. The first in line or closest to the door? 5-10 bikes may be stolen but one of them could be the GPS bike.

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1/16/2018 10:11 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/16/2018 10:11 AM

I'd make the shop a effing fortress.

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1/16/2018 10:17 AM

snillum wrote:

Would it be cost effective to invest in a couple good GPS trackers, do your best to hide it on just 1 or 2 bikes, and then strategically stage those particular bikes to be the easiest to take. The first in line or closest to the door? 5-10 bikes may be stolen but one of them could be the GPS bike.

It would, but then you're already up close to $1000. If we aren't broken into we just threw that money out the window. If we are broken into we still pay the insurance deductible and are still out the money for the trackers. The probability of recovering a brand new bike after a theft in the same, sellable condition as when it left is slim to none. So your stuck with a recovered bike that you have to spend additional money on to be able to sell it. Even then, the bike will belong to the insurance company at that point. We would have to buy it back from them if we wanted it. Then you might be able to sell it if you are able to title it, which is up in the air. Margins are so small on new units anyways (contrary to popular belief) every penny counts when you're just trying to turn a minimal profit. It's a damned if you do, damned if you don't type of situation. Pair that with a motorcycle market that is way down, the people that do want to buy think they shouldn't pay retail because they're fast and they'll run my fender decals or whatever the story is, you're looking at a lose lose situation. The industry is tough already as it is without the thieves.

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1/16/2018 10:19 AM

rongi#401 wrote:

I'd make the shop a effing fortress.

That's pretty much what we've done and it seems to have worked so far. That's not to say they won't try and they probably will again soon. Heck, they're hitting dealerships in busy areas, right along highways in city limits with traffic passing by. They're squeezing dirt bikes out of windows and disappearing into the surrounding neighborhoods.

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1/16/2018 11:09 AM

I’d heard somewhere that KTMs when sold require the ECU to be unlocked. Without it they’ll only have limited function. Not sure if this is true, but, it would curtail theft for the wheelie boy set.

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1/16/2018 11:31 AM

I do know some OEM's do this, but I'm not sure about KTM/Husky. I know for a fact that Can-Am does this.

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1/16/2018 12:29 PM

KTM and Husqvarna four strokes will not start unless the dealer hooks up the computer and installs a code.

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1/16/2018 12:50 PM

It stands to reason that Austria is under represented on the streets of our beloved inner cities then.

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1/16/2018 12:59 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/16/2018 1:02 PM

Most of the bike shops I go to have nothing to very litle for perimeter and store front security. If I was a theiving fuck I could crash the local shop's front doors with a van, and load up 3 new 450s before the local pd even got the call out.

First line of defense.

Photo

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Second line, two of these stout bastards sleeping in the showroom at night
Photo

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1/16/2018 1:07 PM

A lot of them do not. We have burglar bars and a 3 ft high, 4" steel pipe rail along the other perimeter as well as the same piping gates that swing and lock into the doors. You won't be driving through those, however a few have tried. We also block all doorways with side by sides and block the unprotected entrances with steel crates. The point being, we try to make it as difficult as possible. Can they still get in? Sure, but it won't be easy.

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