Private track sprinkler system questions

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8/5/2020 7:43 AM

I'm looking into installing a sprinkler system on my private track which is about half a mile long, flat and full of jumps. I will be using a pond and water tanks. Anyone have experience installing a sprinkler system? I don't really know where to start as far as materials to buy. Not sure if my 2 inch gas pump is good enough either. My semi trucks have 3 inch gear pumps that can blow a heavy commercial hose out. I own a tanker trucking company, so I'm familiar with moving 7000 gallons of liquid at a time, but this is a little different.
Thanks for the help.

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8/5/2020 8:39 AM

I was contemplating doing this at my club's track.

I think a 2" trash pump with a over pressure release back to the tank would be ideal. Then you can walk around to the sprinklers on posts and turn them on or off as needed per section dryness/available pressure.

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Washed up moto and enduro weekend warrior.

8/5/2020 8:42 AM

I've done a few for my own lawns but nothing that large. I can imagine you'd be fine as long as you don't use too many sprinkler heads. Start by placing sprinklers only near the corners and then add some more if you have enough pressure.

Also, don't underestimate the force of gravity; keep your pump at the highest geographical spot you can. Finally, you might want to consider having a few hose bibs somewhere in line so you can spot-water.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/5/2020 9:10 AM

We used to have sprinklers lining most our track. We have A LOT of elevation change so it worked at various levels of performance. Hard part was keeping all the sprinkler heads functioning while pumping pond/swamp water. Plus all the damage the lines incurred while a crew of guys operated equipment (dozers, chisel plows, discs, etc). Lots of ooopsies and climate related damage.

We ended up plumbing in fire hose bibs at various spots while combining water trailers/tractors. Least amount of maintenance.so far.

You'll need a big pump. I'd go 3-4" with volume and reduce wherever needed for pressure.

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8/5/2020 9:17 AM

I've only have one summer with a system..and I have learned...have plenty of extra heads,nipples,t's,etc...

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scte3.0 pro-line trinity tekin

8/5/2020 9:26 AM

As a small track owner I dreamed of a sprinkler system, I tinkered around with several different things and now own 5 water trucks.....

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8/5/2020 10:38 AM

Sprinkler system.. PVC pipe is always broken the riser to heads are always run over hit with mower ect. Had cattle trample a few. The assuming you are pulling from a pond the heads will need cleaned often.
Pump $1000.00 $ 2500.00 in pipe & materials , Heads $ 15.00 up each. Trencher rental ect.

If you go this route use HDPE plastic pipe. Its tough wont shatter in the cold ect. draw back a bit more costly
& is fused together with a machine you would need to rent.

Dont forget about blowing the system out every fall.
We even drilled a well to keep pond full , used the system for 2 years.

Went to 2" outlets around track & ended up using hoses..You want to get a work out.. drag hoses...
One other think to consider with a sprinkler system is if you change track layout
you will not remember where you put the pipe & tear it out . The heads will be in the wrong spot after track changes.
We use a water truck now... However they are not maintenance free. Good Luck !

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8/5/2020 11:05 AM

Lots of good info. Thanks. I'm pretty much trying to make a one man watering operation that saves me time. I'm the only mechanic for my small company, plus maintenance on bikes, dirt prep, 3 little kids. I don't want to maintain a water truck on top of all
that. I've got enough invested in track related equipment that I really just need a good watering system. Not changing the layout sucks, but maybe I can reverse some sections every couple years. I already know the track is better backwards than the way it's set up. Just a couple jumps I wouldn't want to reverse for safety's sake. Time is very valuable to me.

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8/5/2020 2:55 PM

My family had a track in Florida for 25 years and we used sprinklers for them As our only source of water. We had huge events, large practice crowds and it always worked wonders. PM me if you have any direct questions that you wanna dive deeper into.

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8/6/2020 4:00 AM

At our track ,we use 1 inch hoses. 21 hose points, each point is a cam lock fitting with a gate valve.
The pump is a 4 inch volume pump that delivers into a 2 inch ring main..2 inch is too small a diameter for a big outdoor track, not enough delivery capacity....to much drag.. but a 4 inch ring main would have been massivmore expensive.
I personally don't like sprinkler set ups... never seen one that works well...all I ever see is bog holes and bulldust.
Water trucks are just never ending problems and a massive money pit...
Cannot beat hand watering with hoses that pump out good volums of water but of course there are down sides.
But our Chesney Vale ride park's popularity is based pretty much on perfect track prep and our rewatering through the day without having to stop riding...hose watering gives the best results.and is the most economical use of water if water supply is an issue....but there are down sides

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2020 YZ450F
2006 YZ125
2013 YZ 250F special edition
2017 YZ 250
2015 YZ 250f soecial edition
2019 KTM 85 big wheel

8/6/2020 8:38 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/6/2020 8:40 AM

Here's my 2 cents. I've watered race tracks with water trucks, although sometime a pain it always got the job done.

We now have a 9-hole golf course... our biggest issue and upkeep... the sprinkler system. Lines break, sprinkler heads get stopped up, quit rotating, pump issues. As I'm typing this we have a sprinkler that won't shut off, will need to shut system down, replace sprinkler. In the past 30 days we have spent over $4,000.00 on replacements. Plus remember, wind is a huge issue.

My suggestion, stay with water trucks.

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Mike Kidd
Jacksboro Golf
Scramblecross

8/6/2020 9:05 AM

You would be better off with hoses.

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8/6/2020 2:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/6/2020 2:18 PM

Run the water truck, soak it.. done.. you'll spend a lot of time tinker with heads and getting the water where you want it. Then theirs the wind and heat. You will lose a lot of the water to evap trying to get it to soak into the track. I see your in PA, that kills the deal right there in my opinion with winter seasons. Your sprinkler will only be useful for summer season, then you have to winterize.. blah blah.. Winter will be hard to keep your sprinkler from braking apart everywhere even if you blow the water out of it..

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8/6/2020 7:02 PM

Moto_Geek wrote:

Run the water truck, soak it.. done.. you'll spend a lot of time tinker with heads and getting the water where you want it. Then theirs the wind and heat. You will lose a lot of the water to evap trying to get it to soak into the track. I see your in PA, that kills the deal right there in my opinion with winter seasons. Your sprinkler will only be useful for summer season, then you have to winterize.. blah blah.. Winter will be hard to keep your sprinkler from braking apart everywhere even if you blow the water out of it..

Maybe your right. Idk. One good thing is I at least know how to maintain a truck.

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8/6/2020 7:16 PM

mikec265 wrote:

Lots of good info. Thanks. I'm pretty much trying to make a one man watering operation that saves me time. I'm the only mechanic for my small company, plus maintenance on bikes, dirt prep, 3 little kids. I don't want to maintain a water truck on top of all
that. I've got enough invested in track related equipment that I really just need a good watering system. Not changing the layout sucks, but maybe I can reverse some sections every couple years. I already know the track is better backwards than the way it's set up. Just a couple jumps I wouldn't want to reverse for safety's sake. Time is very valuable to me.

The water truck would be way less work.

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8/6/2020 8:16 PM

Elevation and water weight is your friend. Statically, kinda, water pressure increases .7 psi per 12” of elevation, this is compounded with water weight and the elevation of said water weight. If I was building an automated sprinter with a holding tank, I’d erect the holding tank as high as possibly, 40-60’. A small pump should be able to fill that tank well enough. Use plenty of shutoff valves to help retain your holding tank while fixing leaks, and use shutoff valves that won’t increase pipe ID. Google “fluid dynamics” and read up on the basics.

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8/6/2020 10:23 PM

It locks you into your layout too. If you want to be able to make changes water truck may be the way to go.

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8/7/2020 1:26 PM

As much as the idea of sprinklers is so tempting, this is the ticket.

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8/7/2020 2:07 PM

CivBars wrote:

As much as the idea of sprinklers is so tempting, this is the ticket.

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I built the same basic setup, my only complaint is 300 gallons of water doesn't go very far...

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8/7/2020 3:18 PM

Get a flow meter and test first and foremost how much volume/pressure you can obtain—and go from there.

I own a irrigation company (installation from football fields, baseball fields, malls and residential), and simply slapping some pipe together and throwing some heads on rarely works...

Get a dog walker and find how much pipe you'll need (I would recommend poly). Once you established, calculate volume/minute and that will tell you how many heads you can put on per "zone"...

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8/7/2020 9:39 PM

CivBars wrote:

As much as the idea of sprinklers is so tempting, this is the ticket.

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Some PVC
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I've got a 300 gallon tote and a 5x8 trailer with a 2 inch trash pump. I'm looking for something less time consuming. My little set up requires 2 guys, but I'd like to get a one man watering setup going.
Plus 300 gallons doesn't do much except cutting a little dust down in the main line. Looking for a low maintenance one man watering operation. At this point we have 2 good months of riding left. I'll probably wait until after winter, or pounce on a deal on a water truck. I didn't realize sprinkler setups were that high in maintenance.

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8/7/2020 9:42 PM

I see what you did with the pipe on the back. Interesting.

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8/7/2020 9:56 PM

mikec265 wrote:

I see what you did with the pipe on the back. Interesting.

I wish that I could take credit for that, but it's just something that I saw on the internet. Good luck!

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8/8/2020 8:22 PM

You need more. We have a 6000 gallon on the form of an old concrete truck and an old gas station fuel tank. It flat puts it out.

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