Places to ride in Colorado and Utah?

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11/15/2018 9:27 AM

Me and a couple buddies are planning a trip out west to ride next summer/ early fall.Looking for scenic and single track trails to ride in the Colorado and Utah area. May hit up a track or two as well. The plan is to pull the trailer with the motorhome. We will be starting out in Ohio and heading towards Colorado and Utah. We plan to leave Ohio on August 22nd and return home Sept. 2nd. Just looking for some recommendations on places to ride!

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11/15/2018 9:37 AM

You can't beat Taylor park Reservoir area in Colorado, Utah is great, but Taylor Park is EPIC. I'd skip utah and spend the entire trip in Taylor, you could ride an entire month in taylor and not ride the same trail twice.

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11/15/2018 9:38 AM

for trails, anywhere in the forest but you need to get a forest sticker. Out of state stickers are easy to get just search a place that does them, most dealers do and its $25. Gunnison has some great riding. tracks, depends where you are driving through, but up near Denver you can ride IMI, thunder valley, jewel mx, probably some others I'm forgetting. Down here in the springs you can ride Aztec which is only open on the weekends but usually prepped very nicely. have fun.

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11/15/2018 10:30 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/15/2018 10:31 AM

In Eastern Utah (near the Colorado border)....Moab (it would be an absolute shame for you to come to Utah and not ride there) and the San Rafael Swell (Green River area, Du Binky, 10 Mile Wash, Tubes, etc.) Then Cainville is close by as well (and its a blast even if you skip all the freestyle craziness, if its not your thing). Grab a trail map and you can ride for a couple months without touching the same trail twice. Everything from sand dunes, to hard enduro level single track.

How far West do you want to go? Mountain riding in Utah is a bit further NorthWest...and there is more desert riding in South Western Utah.

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11/15/2018 11:01 AM

American fork, ut. Unbelievable single track. Taylor park is amazing too

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11/15/2018 11:20 AM

Suzuki122rm - I'll check out Taylor Park Reservoir area! We also plan to do Black Bear Pass!

MotoCoUSA - Can you pick up a trail pass at any motorcycle shop in Colorado? Most of us will be on YZ250s. Do we need spark arrestors?

Titan1 - I was into Jeeps for years so we will definitely be going to Moab and Black Bear Pass in Col. Right now nothing is set in stone. We are just looking for the best trails out there whether it be scenic or single track.

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11/15/2018 11:42 AM

JMoore938 wrote:

Suzuki122rm - I'll check out Taylor Park Reservoir area! We also plan to do Black Bear Pass!

MotoCoUSA - Can you pick up a ...more

Yes you need spark arrestors for the national forest. I know all the shops here in Colorado Springs do them, I cant speak for Denver but I'm sure they do. Just google them and give them a call.

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11/15/2018 11:56 AM

What about trail guides? It would be nice to meet up with a trail guide at the trail head. I feel like we would get more riding in that way and less navigating.

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11/15/2018 1:27 PM

Not single track, but if you ride Blackbear then you can't miss Imogene into Ouray.

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11/16/2018 6:00 AM

I will for sure ride Imogene Pass!

Does anyone know when most of these trails close for the year? We really wanted to go towards the end of September but wasn't sure if the trails would be closed by then for the winter.

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11/16/2018 6:32 AM

I'll put in my recommendation for Caineville! I used to go multiple times a year when I was living in Utah. Now I live in Oregon, and I'm still planning a trip out there. I love jumping and it has every size and type of jump you can imagine. My dad has never gone airborne and rides an XL 500. He loves it too. As Titan mentioned, it's great for everyone.

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11/16/2018 6:37 AM

Grand Junction, CO. Miles and miles and miles of open riding. And crazy hills to climb if you got the balls.

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11/16/2018 6:43 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/16/2018 6:54 AM

Buy yourself some good maps and do your research. Somebody in your group should be a good navigator or leader. Don't underestimate the size of the mountains in the Rockies, you can easily get yourself in trouble and end up spending the night in the woods. So have a plan for each day, start early and try to stay on a schedule. As for Taylor Park, I'll be the one to disagree. It's over run by quads and side by sides now, anything at the lower elevations is destroyed. The high mountain stuff is still good but you've got to ride a lot of quad trail now to get there.

As for where to go, you'll have to do some work. Lots of the good stuff is kept quiet now because of what happened in TP. If you go on KTMtalk Trip Reports and read between the lines you can learn quite a bit. Maybe make a few contacts and gain their trust. I've had people there offer to come ride with us so if you'd like that there is that possibility too. Just don't expect anyone to jump up and volunteer right off the bat. In the end, if you do the work ahead of time, you'll have an experience that will blow your mind.

National Geographic has great maps that often are pretty current as well. And there used to be a booklet you could buy called The Trails of Colorado by L&M Productions I think, that's a great place to start, although it's pretty old now. But a lot of those systems are still in use today and it'll give you a good idea of what you're in for. *****I just went to look for a link for the book but the only one I can find is their Idaho one, which I have and it's also great. If I come across one I'll link it here later.

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11/16/2018 7:37 AM

October is the end of riding season in the mountains and it could snow at anytime.
November the passes are closed... September should be good.

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11/16/2018 7:47 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/16/2018 7:54 AM

JMoore938 wrote:

I will for sure ride Imogene Pass!

Does anyone know when most of these trails close for the year? We really wanted to go ...more

Trail closure depends on the trail system. Stuff in the high country may not be open at the end of September due to snow... sometimes trails are closed for wildlife reasons. Trail systems on the Western side of the state will be open since it's lower and warmer over there. Anything above 11,500 ft might be sketchy. I've been in a foot of snow on Red Cone pass at the end of August.. you just never know. People here will tell you if you don't like the weather, get the fuck out... or wait 10 minutes.

As mentioned above, you'll all need spark arrestors and trail permits. Out of state riders do not need to register their bikes, but they do have to buy a permit. You can get them online here: http://cpw.state.co.us/buyapply/Pages/RegistrationsOHV.aspx

Figure out where you're riding and determine if you'll need to re-jet. Your lowlander bikes will run like shit at altitude.

If you're riding the NFS, buy the trail maps and bring a GPS to mark waypoints. The trails are usually well marked, but it helps to have reference material especially cause you might not have any cell service on the trail. Search and Rescue ain't cheap.

Decomposed granite likes to puncture tubes. Bring spares or patch kits. In fact, bring tools and basic spares.

There are so many places to ride all over the state. If you ask me, the best are the ones that no one else goes to. Rampart Range (near Sedalia, CO) has too many cidiots... Just a little past there is Rainbow Falls, Texas Creek, and West Creek.. which are all great. Buena Vista and Salida have all kinds of great riding. There's apparently some epic stuff near Blackhawk/Central City and again out near Gypsum that I have yet to ride but can't wait to. The stuff farther west is amazing and might be more temperate at the end of September.

September puts you at the end of archery and muzzleloader season for big game, too. Don't be a dick to hunters.

Stay the Trail has some maps and riding areas marked out: http://staythetrail.org/content.aspx?page_id=22&club_id=266593&module_id=234443

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11/16/2018 8:04 AM

pancake wrote:

Trail closure depends on the trail system. Stuff in the high country may not be open at the end of September due to snow... ...more

Hey pancake, since you're in Bailey, do you ever ride Webster and Red Cone and Radical Hill and all that?

That's my hangout, even though it's been taken over by side by sides lately...

I've got a cool video of me conquering Red Cone on the KLR on Youtube, plus many others.


Here's Imogene



And Red Cone


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11/16/2018 8:17 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/16/2018 8:26 AM

disbanded wrote:

Hey pancake, since you're in Bailey, do you ever ride Webster and Red Cone and Radical Hill and all that?

That's my hangout, ...more

I have ridden Webster and Red Cone before, but never gone over to Radical Hill. I took my old 950 Adventure S up Webster and that was hilarious and maybe even stupid.. haha That's great riding over there. I've been working on getting my '09 crf450 plated so I can run from red cone down through Montezuma and ride those trails on the other side behind Keystone.

Nice videos! You're right, though.. Jeeps and side by sides are all over that place.

[LINK TO IMAGE]

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11/17/2018 8:10 PM

Thanks for all the info everyone! I’ll be doing some more research on the trip in the coming months. Try to get some details nailed down!

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11/18/2018 6:57 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/18/2018 7:00 AM

My .02,cents....Rampart range has some great singletrack and miles of trails to explore,, but it does get busy on weekends, you avoid the idiots as another poster mentioned by going a little further south.
Thunder valley is about an hour away, right off I70. Grand junction is around a 3 hour drive from thunder, then you can head over to moab, which I agree is a must if you're out this way.
Imogene pass is amazing in a 4X4, but I'm not much for riding on jeep trails, it is a destination for the view, not the riding, plenty of better spots for moto.
That is a great time of year to ride out here, hope you get your trip all dialed in and have an epic adventure!

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11/19/2018 4:27 PM

JVT357 wrote:

American fork, ut. Unbelievable single track. Taylor park is amazing too

The single track is soooo good in American Fork Canyon that its beyond crowded...go ride there, just watch out for hikers, mountain bikers, and horses around every corner (or ride on a non-holiday work day early in the morning).

If you get up to the wasatch front (northern Utah), I'd say go ride Hobble Creek Canyone/Diamond Fork Canyon...I like the single track just as much as American fork canyon, but there is very few people up there...the trails are more technical-which is what keeps a lot of people away from them: lesser skilled dirt bike riders, and mountain bikers-and the views aren't quite as good...but I like it just as much.

PeelOut could tell you more about the trails even further North.

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