Performance shop

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11/21/2020 6:29 AM

I am currently 16 years old, I've been doing mechanic work most of my life, I work at a lawnmower repair shop as a tractor mechanic currently, but my passion is in dirtbikes and motorcycles. My goal is in a few years to open a performance shop. What do you look for in a quality shop?

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11/21/2020 6:44 AM

Honesty is #1. A clean shop and someone who takes pride in what they do. I don’t mind spending a few extra bucks to help the local guy out & obviously quality work.

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11/21/2020 6:53 AM

eric513anderson wrote:

Honesty is #1. A clean shop and someone who takes pride in what they do. I don’t mind spending a few extra bucks to help the local guy out & obviously quality work.

I totally agree with that, thanks for the input!

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11/21/2020 6:54 AM

After spending 20+ years of my professional live in the automotive industry, I can vouch for what Eric said above. Honesty and integrity, above all, is the most important thing when it comes to the service business. Regardless if you're working on mowers, or Mercedes. Keep your head down, and your hopes up. And never stop learning. The second you think you know it all, is when the industry will pass you up. Good luck

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11/21/2020 7:06 AM

Communication.

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"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

11/21/2020 7:19 AM

-MAVERICK- wrote:

Communication.

Yep-- all you need is to run thru some of the Vital threads pertaining to this subject and you'll see that good communication is an absolute necessity. You can be the greatest "tuner" in the world, but........

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11/21/2020 8:33 AM

-MAVERICK- wrote:

Communication.

OldPro277 wrote:

Yep-- all you need is to run thru some of the Vital threads pertaining to this subject and you'll see that good communication is an absolute necessity. You can be the greatest "tuner" in the world, but........

I was originally going to say don't be like Varner or Harris. grin

But great communication goes a long way. Keep your clients informed. Don't ignore calls/emails/texts. If you say you're going to do something, do it. Don't put it on the back burner and come up with a bunch of excuses as to why it wasn't done.

Don't take more work than you are capable of doing.

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"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

11/21/2020 8:40 AM

Get Some technical training that gives you credentials.

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11/21/2020 8:41 AM

Communication, timely service, accurate repairs, attention to detail. Finish off whatever you do with a wipe down and tuck everything away cleanly. Visuals upon receipt of the work is huge. Good luck.....definitely need a few more good shops

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11/21/2020 8:50 AM

numbers wrote:

Get Some technical training that gives you credentials.

Yep, so far I got a scholarship for the high performance engine academy and have several certifications in high performance engine building, along with various other certifications. It's tough still being in school to do much more, but I'm always looking for opportunities to learn more. Reading lots of books, participating in webinars and conferences, etc.

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11/21/2020 8:53 AM

Moto520 wrote:

Communication, timely service, accurate repairs, attention to detail. Finish off whatever you do with a wipe down and tuck everything away cleanly. Visuals upon receipt of the work is huge. Good luck.....definitely need a few more good shops

I whole heatedly agree, I obviously strive for everything mechanical to function in it's optimized state, but I also pay attention to looks. I have a theory that you don't notice things that look good, you just notice things that look bad. Creating something where nothing looks bad, as a whole it looks incredible.

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11/21/2020 9:23 AM

All of the above! And find a good mentor!

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11/21/2020 10:43 AM

do the basics well,

Ring people back,
do stuff when you say your going to do it,
and charge people what you said you were going to charge them

its much easier to ring someone first than be on the back foot when they ring you after a missed deadline,

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11/21/2020 7:45 PM

Great to hear of your future ambitions young man! Here's a few to add...

1. Keep your word

2. Underpromise and Overdeliver

3. Set Goals both short term and long term

4. Get up and show up!

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"I love the smell of race gas in the morning"

11/21/2020 9:47 PM

I strongly encourage you to take some classes about business, economics, marketing, etc to learn more about how to properly run a business. You also need to push as far as you can in math and physics. You still have 2 years of high school left so talk to your counselor about courses you could take to learn skills for running a small business.

Do you plan on going to college after you graduate?

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11/21/2020 10:12 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/21/2020 11:27 PM

mxtech1 wrote:

I strongly encourage you to take some classes about business, economics, marketing, etc to learn more about how to properly run a business. You also need to push as far as you can in math and physics. You still have 2 years of high school left so talk to your counselor about courses you could take to learn skills for running a small business.

Do you plan on going to college after you graduate?

Sound advice but I would for sure focus first and foremost on truly understanding the craft and being hand on to learn. Gotta be able to have something to market and be a viable business. But absolutely learning that stuff is a great step as well! It’s awesome to see such positive comments and people willing to share good advice! How often do you see jaded individuals telling people to avoid the industry and have nothing positive to say. Good job young man, I started tinkering quite a few years ago and got me to the point where I can comfortably rebuild bikes with ease, and it allowed me to start doing work for friends and making enough money to purchase all the tools necessary (as well as start a business from home) But your well on your way! Best of luck!

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11/21/2020 10:48 PM

mxtech1 wrote:

I strongly encourage you to take some classes about business, economics, marketing, etc to learn more about how to properly run a business. You also need to push as far as you can in math and physics. You still have 2 years of high school left so talk to your counselor about courses you could take to learn skills for running a small business.

Do you plan on going to college after you graduate?

I second the math and physics part. Not just knowing what works, but knowing why it works can put you on another level.

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11/22/2020 1:33 AM

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"A rule is a rule and without rules, there is Chaos"....Cosmo Kramer

11/22/2020 2:53 AM

Dont put all your eggs in one basket so to speak , be able to take on other work to keep the lights on if/when things slow down.

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11/22/2020 3:53 AM

Professionalism ... no "bangin" hip hop playing no half naked posters no parts everywhere shop rags all over the place. Time management, plan on 30min at the end of every day to put things away and clean the shop. Clean between each job. Plan 20min in the morning to get your bearings on your day's tasks.
You will do all of this and your day will still be blown to bits with walk-in rush jobs.
Lastly ... no alcohol on premise.

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11/22/2020 4:08 AM

Just from reading your posts it’s pretty easy to tell you’ll more than likely succeed. At 16 you seem to have a great drive and are well spoken. All the info you’re getting is great. I’ve owned my own construction business for 18 years. If you’re driven, honest, enjoy your work and treat your customers as you’d like to be treated you will earn a good living. Good luck!

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11/22/2020 5:30 AM

The good news is that mc service shops completely suck... and people are getting lazier, thus wanting more work done.... be honest.... do actual good work, and you will have a fine career....

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11/22/2020 6:28 AM

-MAVERICK- wrote:

Communication.

OldPro277 wrote:

Yep-- all you need is to run thru some of the Vital threads pertaining to this subject and you'll see that good communication is an absolute necessity. You can be the greatest "tuner" in the world, but........

Exactly. People just want to be kept in the loop. A 3 minute phone call goes a long way in gaining trust and respect. My dads currently going through this with a certain Beta dealer. They’ve had his bike since September and when he calls they don’t return his calls. That’s no bueno. Just talk, communicate, be honest and be fair and people will continue to bring their business to you.

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11/22/2020 6:36 AM

cwel11 wrote:

Just from reading your posts it’s pretty easy to tell you’ll more than likely succeed. At 16 you seem to have a great drive and are well spoken. All the info you’re getting is great. I’ve owned my own construction business for 18 years. If you’re driven, honest, enjoy your work and treat your customers as you’d like to be treated you will earn a good living. Good luck!

I totally agree... reading your post and just seeing everything spelt and punkshuwaited korrectly says a lot about your professionalism.

There is a lot of great advice on here, but the best may have been no alcohol on the premises.

Good luck!

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11/22/2020 3:25 PM

cwel11 wrote:

Just from reading your posts it’s pretty easy to tell you’ll more than likely succeed. At 16 you seem to have a great drive and are well spoken. All the info you’re getting is great. I’ve owned my own construction business for 18 years. If you’re driven, honest, enjoy your work and treat your customers as you’d like to be treated you will earn a good living. Good luck!

Gworm wrote:

I totally agree... reading your post and just seeing everything spelt and punkshuwaited korrectly says a lot about your professionalism.

There is a lot of great advice on here, but the best may have been no alcohol on the premises.

Good luck!

Absolutely, and thank you. The place I currently work always has atleast 6 cases of beer on hand, and 2 of my coworkers are alcoholics without driving licenses. That certainly wouldn't be the case if I go into business for myself.

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11/22/2020 3:28 PM

cwel11 wrote:

Just from reading your posts it’s pretty easy to tell you’ll more than likely succeed. At 16 you seem to have a great drive and are well spoken. All the info you’re getting is great. I’ve owned my own construction business for 18 years. If you’re driven, honest, enjoy your work and treat your customers as you’d like to be treated you will earn a good living. Good luck!

Thank you very much, I definitely love working on motorcycles. It's a great feeling of putting time into something you can feel results in. I also enjoy doing it for customers and having them be satisfied.

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11/22/2020 3:30 PM

JeremyK wrote:

Dont put all your eggs in one basket so to speak , be able to take on other work to keep the lights on if/when things slow down.

That's a big goal of mine. I've also been metal working for about 4 years now and have made some decent income with that, and am getting into welding and fabrication this year. My goal is to be "the guy" for everything, while still be able to make good results in specialized areas.

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11/22/2020 3:33 PM

mxtech1 wrote:

I strongly encourage you to take some classes about business, economics, marketing, etc to learn more about how to properly run a business. You also need to push as far as you can in math and physics. You still have 2 years of high school left so talk to your counselor about courses you could take to learn skills for running a small business.

Do you plan on going to college after you graduate?

I'm currently taking physics and enjoy math. I am undecided on college currently, especially with the way things are right now. I'm trying to get things figured out but planning life can be stressful and I'm not certain to what I want to do. Having my own performance motorcycle shop is a dream and I want to do everything I can to get there, but I'll see what happens.

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11/22/2020 4:12 PM

Jesse Somme wrote:

I'm currently taking physics and enjoy math. I am undecided on college currently, especially with the way things are right now. I'm trying to get things figured out but planning life can be stressful and I'm not certain to what I want to do. Having my own performance motorcycle shop is a dream and I want to do everything I can to get there, but I'll see what happens.

Sounds like you have a good head on your shoulders. You've got something you're passionate about and are doing your research to find out how to make your dream a reality. You're already ahead of 99% of kids your age in that regard.

College isn't a necessity, but as pointed out, you could get an associates degree in small business administration or something similar from a community college which will help you run a business and be a fallback if you decide to go a different route.

Best of luck to you.

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11/22/2020 4:19 PM

cwel11 wrote:

Just from reading your posts it’s pretty easy to tell you’ll more than likely succeed. At 16 you seem to have a great drive and are well spoken. All the info you’re getting is great. I’ve owned my own construction business for 18 years. If you’re driven, honest, enjoy your work and treat your customers as you’d like to be treated you will earn a good living. Good luck!

Jesse Somme wrote:

Thank you very much, I definitely love working on motorcycles. It's a great feeling of putting time into something you can feel results in. I also enjoy doing it for customers and having them be satisfied.

When you can afford one purchase a good dyno and learn how to use it.

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