Pelargonium Graveolens, Broc Tickle & WADA

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5/16/2018 11:26 PM

I did a little digging on the banned substance that has caused Broc Tickle so much trouble.

I'm not sure if any of this has been said but here's my two cents worth . . .

I came across an informative website www.lifeinthefastlane.com
A Australian sports medicine site to help athletic departments be informed of banned substances.

Link to article. https://lifeinthefastlane.com/methylhexanamine/

They go through all the banned substance and the trouble with stay "clean" because of all the various supplements and nutrition options are not labeled consistent with the actual product. Also, common issues of not knowing of banned substance under a different name.

The substance Methylhexanamine was a banned in 2010 as a Non Specified stimulant by WADA
It cares a Two Year sanction minimum if used in-competition . . . That's the Bad News.


Ok, so the thing is Methylhexanamine also goes under the name of Pelargonium graveolens which is a common element in fragrance, aromatic oils, massage oil and some dietary supplements.

Pelargonium graveolens is a geranium plant that's widely used for it's aromatic fragrance.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelargonium_graveolens#Uses

Looking at the Global DRO website to check for banned substances in specific country and sport
https://www.globaldro.com/AU/search/input?pls=true

I did another search for Pelargonium graveolens and found that it is at the bottom of the banned substance list under Methylhexanamine . . . It lists Pelargonium graveolens Extract, as well as Geranium extract

Photo

Going back to the www.lifeinthefastlane.com article, it states:

Methylhexaneamine is also a constituent of flower (geranium) oil, sold as an integral component of nutritional supplements. It is technically correct to say that methylhexaneamine is a dietary supplement, as it is a component of the oil from Pelargonium graveolens, which is approved for use in food. Methylhexaneamine has been demonstrated to comprise 0.66 – 1% of geranium oil, a similar compound to plant ratio as many other commonly available herbs.

Now, if the original use and delivery of Methylhexaneamine as a nasal decongestant, then why couldn't an athlete get contaminated from smelling geranium flowers, or use of a aromatic fragrance, or a geranium massage oil?

Hardly, the extra stimulant to boost performance WADA is policing for!

Could it be that Broc had traces of this geranium plant or geranium oil in or on his body during the testing procedure?

More questions in a sea of grey area . . .

#Let Broc Race!

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5/16/2018 11:47 PM

From Wikipedia -

Methylhexanamine-containing supplements sometimes list "geranium oil" or "geranium extract" as a source of methylhexanamine. However, geranium oils do not contain methylhexanamine, and the methylhexanamine in these supplements is added in the form of synthetic material.[7] Recent studies have shown that DMAA is found in some types of geraniums.[8]

Deaths and injuries
In 2010, a 21-year-old male in New Zealand presented with a cerebral hemorrhage after ingesting 556 mg of methylhexanamine, caffeine, and alcohol.[14] Health authorities in Hawaii linked cases of liver failure and one death to OxyElite Pro.[15]

The death of Claire Squires, a runner who collapsed near the finish-line of the April 2012 London Marathon, has been linked to methylhexanamine. The coroner stated that methylhexanamine was "probably an important factor" during the inquest. Despite, according to a friend, having been diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat[16] - and advised not to consume methylhexanamine, it is believed that she consumed the substance through drinking an energy drink, which was subsequently adjusted to exclude methylhexanamine.[17]

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5/17/2018 6:07 AM

tmphotoart wrote:

I did a little digging on the banned substance that has caused Broc Tickle so much trouble.

I'm not sure if any of this has ...more

Interesting that list does not include 5-methylhexan-2-amine, which is what was specifically called out in the press releases of Broc's suspension.

I really feel that this whole deal is bs. It seems there are so many different names and compounds of some of these "PEDs" that WADA just list everything possible in an attempt to encompass everything these dietary supplement companies might try to relabel ingredients as.

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