Okay this is embarrasing, but I need help...

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8/5/2016 7:52 PM

So I won had my first ever moto win yesterday and I gotta say it was wicked cool. The only problem is once I made the pass for first, my nerves took over, my stomach started flip flopping REAL hard, and I began to ride kinda crappy. Once the race was over and I got my bike back to my truck, I handed it off to my dad with no words and straight up puked from how hard my stomach churned due to my nerves. I guess my point is, how can I prevent this from happening in the future besides "get more experience leading?" I felt like a total jackass, I mean who wins and then pukes from nerves? This might be a dumb question, but any help is appreciated.

TL;DR: How do I prepare to keep calm while leading a race?

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No I don't ride an 85 anymore.

8/5/2016 7:56 PM

Drew Pearson of the Cowboys would puke at least once every game from nerves.

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Ed Johnson

8/5/2016 7:59 PM

No prep will get you there, you gotta flip the switch inside yourself to just not accept the nerves. When you take the lead just focus on hitting your lines and pushing forward; it'll keep your mind busy.

Also, more wins / laps led will drastically help.

Congrats on the win!

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8/5/2016 8:19 PM

You just graduated!

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8/5/2016 8:20 PM

Congratulations!!!!

You can prevent this from happening again by, "not winning"?
All I can say is, wish I had a story like that.

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8/5/2016 8:27 PM

Every day when I went outside the wire in AFG I had no problem prepping, loading up, executing my mission, and completing the mission. The issue was once we unloaded the vehicles I would wrech or puke, it's your pent up anxiety and nerves and totally normal... Congrats on your first win now the hard part is backing it up!

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Never try to argue with idiots; they will only bring you down to their level.....and being more experienced, they will beat you at their own game!


2006 KX250

8/5/2016 8:50 PM

Wow, maybe a different hobby/career?

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8/5/2016 8:55 PM

LOL. Welcome to motocross, it's gets better the more you race; for some it never goes away - but, that's why we race!

Still happens to me if I haven't raced in a while or can't get my head right.

Don't worry though once you stop puking because of nerves, you'll start puking from exertion. So there's that.

Congrats and may you splash your boots and spew puddles under your lawn chair for many years and motos to come!

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8/5/2016 8:57 PM

Focus on the track. Focus on the section you're in, and plan for the lines in the next section. Take a breath over the jumps. Think about how each section of the track flows into the next. Like the Pros always say, Just ride your own race. Good luck man!

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8/5/2016 9:04 PM

Here's a great article from Dr Cohn who's a mental training coach:

Anxiety and worry are the biggest performance problem for young competitive athletes.

Anxious athletes report the following:
--“I play so well in practice but mess up in games.”
--“I’m so nervous in games that I get sick to my stomach.”
--“I become so anxious in competitions that I can’t concentrate.”
--“I always fall apart when the game is on the line.”
--“I get so nervous that I don’t even enjoy my sport anymore.”

Performance anxiety wears on athletes, which can create a host of negative physical and mental issues that can hurt your performance.

Do you or your athletes experience physical changes, such as racing heart beats, difficulty breathing, tight muscles, upset stomach, jumpiness and an inability to produce smooth or fluid mechanics?

While the physical symptoms are difficult enough to deal with, it’s the mental worry that triggers the physical changes.

Negative thinking, fear of failing, inability to deal with adversity or uncertainty, problems with focusing and the overwhelming need to be perfect are the mental trigger that can lead to performance anxiety.

To make matters worse, athletes often stress our over their inability to manage the choking response.

These young athletes feel isolated and believe themselves to be the only ones negatively affected by anxiety.

Truth be told, even Olympic and professional athletes can become overwhelmed by anxiety.

To help you overcome anxiety and fear, you can't just do relaxation training. This is simply a band aid and does not address the real issue, which I find is often related to fear of failure.

Tips for managing competitive anxiety:

Underneath the tension and worry you feel is something else you might NOT be aware of, such as the fear of embarrassment.

To overcome performance anxiety:

1. Understand what the ultimate fear is all about. Are you afraid to disappoint others, for example?

2. Challenge the rationality of your fear. What's so important about it?

3. Learn how to embrace competition pressure rather than fear you will fail or feel disappointed.

4. Understand the reason you put in hours per week of training is to have fun and trust your skills in competition!

-Dr. Patrick Cohn
http://www.peaksports.com/

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8/5/2016 9:21 PM

CarlinoJoeVideo wrote:

Here's a great article from Dr Cohn who's a mental training coach:

Anxiety and worry are the biggest performance problem for young competitive athletes.

Anxious athletes report the following:
--“I play so well in practice but mess up in games.”
--“I’m so nervous in games that I get sick to my stomach.”
--“I become so anxious in competitions that I can’t concentrate.”
--“I always fall apart when the game is on the line.”
--“I get so nervous that I don’t even enjoy my sport anymore.”

Performance anxiety wears on athletes, which can create a host of negative physical and mental issues that can hurt your performance.

Do you or your athletes experience physical changes, such as racing heart beats, difficulty breathing, tight muscles, upset stomach, jumpiness and an inability to produce smooth or fluid mechanics?

While the physical symptoms are difficult enough to deal with, it’s the mental worry that triggers the physical changes.

Negative thinking, fear of failing, inability to deal with adversity or uncertainty, problems with focusing and the overwhelming need to be perfect are the mental trigger that can lead to performance anxiety.

To make matters worse, athletes often stress our over their inability to manage the choking response.

These young athletes feel isolated and believe themselves to be the only ones negatively affected by anxiety.

Truth be told, even Olympic and professional athletes can become overwhelmed by anxiety.

To help you overcome anxiety and fear, you can't just do relaxation training. This is simply a band aid and does not address the real issue, which I find is often related to fear of failure.

Tips for managing competitive anxiety:

Underneath the tension and worry you feel is something else you might NOT be aware of, such as the fear of embarrassment.

To overcome performance anxiety:

1. Understand what the ultimate fear is all about. Are you afraid to disappoint others, for example?

2. Challenge the rationality of your fear. What's so important about it?

3. Learn how to embrace competition pressure rather than fear you will fail or feel disappointed.

4. Understand the reason you put in hours per week of training is to have fun and trust your skills in competition!

-Dr. Patrick Cohn
http://www.peaksports.com/

For a motocross there's a way to keep yourself from worrying about the competition or getting caught up in other things that can mess up your focus:

Focus on your perfect lap. Try to hit your lines and focus on your riding and JUST your riding.
Or, say it like this, do your own Kenny Roczen impression.

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I ripped a start from Egypt and I was happy about that.

8/5/2016 9:22 PM

It's crazy what nerves can do to a person. I used to coach youth football. The best kid we had on the team was a nervous wreck! His dad said he would not sleep or eat the night before a game. Usually the first few plays of the game he would freeze up. Once you got him to relax he was gold. Did it all. Scored played defense. Just awesome talent. I'm not sure what could help calm those nerves.. I'm sure it gets a lot people who would normally be awesome. As far as I know its just a lot of experience in a race/game situation that would help..

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8/5/2016 9:24 PM

Rejoice the moment no matter how you celbrate it. Lol.

Most of us never get to win a moto.

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8/5/2016 9:26 PM

Old-Man wrote:

Wow, maybe a different hobby/career?

You have the wrong attitude, the poster is just a kid. Can't say I've ever thrown up from anxiety, but everyone's different.

OP just keep racing, it'll get better. And remember, it's just a race. Getting that worried is a sure fire way to leave in an ambulance.

Btw congrats on your win!

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8/5/2016 9:38 PM

No worries, totally normal, have done it myself but both times have been crashes for me. Congrats!!!!

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8/5/2016 11:16 PM

Make sure you are breathing, especially some solid in/out controlled breathes.

I had the same thing happen when I was a kid when I first stayed racing BMX. I was winning, and beteeen trying so hard and being nervous, I would hold my breath, basically hyper ventilate, and then sometimes puke.

Made that victory Sloppy Joe from the concession stand that much better.

Keep up the winning ways, and always remember how good it feels.

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8/6/2016 12:03 AM

Old-Man wrote:

Wow, maybe a different hobby/career?

What? Hell no!! Kid just did what a lot of us have done. I did it on the line once way back when. I've seen it happen to guys...in the middle of the race.

More racing and being up front...a lot of the sickness will go away. Might still get the serious butter flies ....but that's normal too.

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

8/6/2016 12:14 AM

When I played competitive hockey, I did it hundreds of times, always before the game though. Once game started, I was focused on the game. Only chucked after the game due to physical exertion, or because I didn't replenish the lost liquids from the pre game hurl. Post above is correct, control your anxiety through breathing. In through the nose slowly, To a count of at least ten, then slowly exhale through mouth to count of at least ten

Won't help you much during a race though. You are a much better racer than me, I didn't have the skill to think about winning or losing the race I had to focus on just staying up and trying to be fast. Keep that in mind, you are good! You are leading or challenging for the lead - you got talent!

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8/6/2016 12:23 AM

I couldnt really eat on race day. It Started when I was a kid in the 50 class when I got decent and expected to win, got butterflies on the drive to the track one day, and was off all day, won all 4 Motos and then was fine the rest of the day. I never puked though, I'm not a puker.

As I got older and more serious about racing, I would carbo load the night before with Pasta and protein, because I knew I couldn't get more than a granola bar in between Motos without feeling sick. So I would drink plenty of water and stay hydrated as well as a protein type drink or even a Coke for the sugar to get some sort of calories in for the second Moto. After the Motos all was good, and couldn't get to the snack bar quick enough.

27 years into racing and I can eat just fine, cause I don't care anymore about my results.

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8/6/2016 1:03 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/6/2016 1:07 AM

rm85racer wrote:

So I won had my first ever moto win yesterday and I gotta say it was wicked cool. The only problem is once I made the pass for first, my nerves took over, my stomach started flip flopping REAL hard, and I began to ride kinda crappy. Once the race was over and I got my bike back to my truck, I handed it off to my dad with no words and straight up puked from how hard my stomach churned due to my nerves. I guess my point is, how can I prevent this from happening in the future besides "get more experience leading?" I felt like a total jackass, I mean who wins and then pukes from nerves? This might be a dumb question, but any help is appreciated.

TL;DR: How do I prepare to keep calm while leading a race?

Doesn't sound like you lift bro. :-)

What 51xc says about breathing is spot on. Good luck and have fun.

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"My philosophy is to have a really good time and never to let anything stop me from doing what I want to do.

Michel Petrucciani

8/6/2016 1:05 AM

try to concentrate on your breathing! it sounds simple and is kind of awkward to work on but it could help you to stay a lot calmer in that situation.

it happens even to very experienced athletes. when portugal won the soccer eu title just recently one of their most experienced players pucked right on the pitch infront of everyone after the game was finished.

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8/6/2016 4:44 AM

My advice is perspective. You have a piece of metal in front of you, it drops and you go ride your dirt bike. Treat your competition as a blur, never in focus, just in the way, ride your laps and ignore everything else.

I use to get nervous, real nervous before a race, so much so that I didn't race for years. Got back on the gate this year after 17 years. 4 moto wins. I was determined to beat the nerves, it came from really doing what I know how to do and what I work on in my riding.

I can tell you my good buddy which is tiny bit better, could get behind me and make me crash every time. It would piss me off so bad. Well I made stupid mistakes because my focus was on him and not my riding. You will drive yourself crazy worrying about 2nd.

Only time I worry about a rider behind me is the last turn of the last lap.

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8/6/2016 4:56 AM

First off congrats. Now that you got your first win, you know you can do it. Go for it again. Pretty damn soon you be wanting those wins so bad you won't have time to think about nerves.

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8/6/2016 5:14 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/6/2016 5:48 AM

Learn to give up judging yourself in a negative way. Heroes puke, military puke, drunken idiots puke. People doing chemo puke.

Choose what puking means to you. Certainly not being a jackass. Being a fricken' RACER that won a race !!!

Follow the great advice above, but don't EVER see yourself in a negative way by JUDGING your action or your reaction.

Quite frankly, I admire the fact that you gave it your all. If it happens again, it will be because you put it ALL out there, champ.

Well done.

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8/6/2016 5:49 AM

rm85racer wrote:

So I won had my first ever moto win yesterday and I gotta say it was wicked cool. The only problem is once I made the pass for first, my nerves took over, my stomach started flip flopping REAL hard, and I began to ride kinda crappy. Once the race was over and I got my bike back to my truck, I handed it off to my dad with no words and straight up puked from how hard my stomach churned due to my nerves. I guess my point is, how can I prevent this from happening in the future besides "get more experience leading?" I felt like a total jackass, I mean who wins and then pukes from nerves? This might be a dumb question, but any help is appreciated.

TL;DR: How do I prepare to keep calm while leading a race?

Stand in front of the mirror, point at yourself and say dont be a pussy...If that doesnt work punch yourself in the face or stomach every day until you harden up a bit.

Worth a shot.

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8/6/2016 6:00 AM

This might sound kinda stupid, but I sing when im racing. it keeps my mind off of the nerves and how tired I am. im able to hit my lines and put down good laps. everybody gets nervous. Shit im getting anxious just sitting her thinking about racing...lol.

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I occasionally ride my dirtbike during the week ...So no, I’m not a weekend warrior.

8/6/2016 6:08 AM

rm85racer wrote:

So I won had my first ever moto win yesterday and I gotta say it was wicked cool. The only problem is once I made the pass for first, my nerves took over, my stomach started flip flopping REAL hard, and I began to ride kinda crappy. Once the race was over and I got my bike back to my truck, I handed it off to my dad with no words and straight up puked from how hard my stomach churned due to my nerves. I guess my point is, how can I prevent this from happening in the future besides "get more experience leading?" I felt like a total jackass, I mean who wins and then pukes from nerves? This might be a dumb question, but any help is appreciated.

TL;DR: How do I prepare to keep calm while leading a race?

Congrats on your win buddy!!

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8/6/2016 7:09 AM

One thing that bothered me when I raced a lot was cold water. Especially on hot days.

The cold water always seemed to upset my stomach if I had it right before a moto. I never threw up but I could tell it was bothering me.

So I had some cold waters in an ice chest and a separate small ice chest with no ice and waters in there. Just so they didn't get super hot.

That worked for me. Now, I don't really care so I just deal with it.

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8/6/2016 7:20 AM

51xc wrote:

try to concentrate on your breathing! it sounds simple and is kind of awkward to work on but it could help you to stay a lot calmer in that situation.

it happens even to very experienced athletes. when portugal won the soccer eu title just recently one of their most experienced players pucked right on the pitch infront of everyone after the game was finished.

good advice in all kinds of situations really.....confidence is key....much of racing is mental and once you get the attitude that you own that race and believe it I'm sure your nerves will subside....not to say you wont get nervous but just not to the degree your experiencing it now....good luck with it...

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8/6/2016 7:23 AM

rm85racer wrote:

So I won had my first ever moto win yesterday and I gotta say it was wicked cool. The only problem is once I made the pass for first, my nerves took over, my stomach started flip flopping REAL hard, and I began to ride kinda crappy. Once the race was over and I got my bike back to my truck, I handed it off to my dad with no words and straight up puked from how hard my stomach churned due to my nerves. I guess my point is, how can I prevent this from happening in the future besides "get more experience leading?" I felt like a total jackass, I mean who wins and then pukes from nerves? This might be a dumb question, but any help is appreciated.

TL;DR: How do I prepare to keep calm while leading a race?

CBird81 wrote:

Congrats on your win buddy!!

BOOM!

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I ripped a start from Egypt and I was happy about that.