Moto Jobs

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2/22/2017 3:50 AM

Is it even realistic to try to get a job in the industry?

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2/22/2017 4:13 AM

Motorcycle shops hire all the time.

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2/22/2017 4:26 AM

Its possible, but IMO making your hobby your job sucks the life out of it.. ran a motorcycle dealership , just didn't want to do anything for myself after 6 day weeks working on other peoples bikes.

Weekend warrior stuff is great, but have a regular job backing it up.... the guys on here with tonnage , with regards to bikes and kit, get it from earning proper dollar in a good day job,

MX is hard to monetize.

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2/22/2017 4:36 AM

I've thought about working at a dealership, but I would have to take a large pay cut. Most of the guys I know who work at a dealer actually have a wife with a much better paying job. Or they are broke and just squeak by.

Then there is the fact a lot of them are burned out on bikes. And you're pretty much guaranteed to work every Saturday.

Don't think I could do it.

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2/22/2017 4:59 AM

I worked at a shop for 4 years, and while I loved being around the shop and working on bikes, I didn't want to touch my own bike because I was burnt out. It also sucked selling my friends parts so they could ride while I sat at work all weekend

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2017 RMZ450
2005 YZ250-sold :,(
1998 YZ250
2005 KX250F

80% of the time it works every time
IG @2HRacing
Thanks to : Factory Effex, N2Dirt, Acerbis, DT1, Fasthouse, Matix, FMF, ASV, 100% & Mika Metals

2/22/2017 5:27 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/22/2017 5:30 AM

Jobs in this sport that pay well, are about as limited as factory rides. Getting a factory gig is tough, so is trying to make a good living off of motocross..... it just isn't there.
However, if you wanted to possibly be a promoter, then that's a completely different set of rules

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2/22/2017 6:04 AM

dadofagun wrote:

Jobs in this sport that pay well, are about as limited as factory rides. Getting a factory gig is tough, so is trying to make a good living off of motocross..... it just isn't there.
However, if you wanted to possibly be a promoter, then that's a completely different set of rules

Just curious what the rules are for promoters?

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2/22/2017 6:13 AM

dcorbett62 wrote:

Is it even realistic to try to get a job in the industry?

Are you Roger Decosters son or a former pro?

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2/22/2017 6:52 AM

dcorbett62 wrote:

Is it even realistic to try to get a job in the industry?

I'll go slightly against the grain here--if you're young, go for it now before life's responsibilities get in the way. There are a lot of different ways to be in the industry, from racer to mechanic / support, to promoter / manufacturer jobs, even the photo / journalism angle. That's what I did at the end of high school decades ago, and had a blast. But you won't make a lot of money at first, like everyone here has said. To put it in perspective--I made more in Basic Training for the military than I did at my industry job. But I also had 17 bikes in my garage at one point, which was pretty damn awesome (no, I didn't own them all, most were test bikes).

Take a shot at what you love or have passion for, but be realistic in you early expectations, then make out of it whatever you can.

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2/22/2017 7:10 AM

I worked at the motorcycle shop from the age of 14 until 22ish. Loved the work and most of the people. Only left because of low pay and trying to race on my own. Motorcycle people are generally a good bunch. I always enjoyed going to work at the shop. Now I make good money but the feel good gratification isn't always there at the end of the day. It's something special when you do good work on someone's bike and they appreciate it.
Not many industry's offer that kind of feeling at the end of the day.

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2/22/2017 8:48 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/22/2017 8:49 AM

It's very possible just gotta be persistent and have a few connections. When I was 18 in 2001 I sent resumes to all the major company's with a few people I knew in the industry as references. I got two offers back from a couple company's for a sales and rider support positions. Chose the best of the two opportunities and moved to So Cal from NY a couple months after high school. Too make the experience even crazier.... I got there the day of 9/11. Being a lifelong New Yorker it was a very difficult time being that far from home. Long story short It didn't pan out to be my permenat career as I eventually made my way back to New York and settled down back here, but it was a hell of an experience!! Lived on the beach and got to do and see so much behind the scenes stuff that I never would of been apart of without being in the industry. My advice is go for it! If you want it bad enough you try and try until something happens.

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2/22/2017 8:49 AM

i've always loved the idea of getting in the industry. i'm young, i just have such a passion for the sport. even driving for a team or smaller team would be awesome, i have experience driving and my class A CDL. im also a realist at the same time and it's a shame you have to know someone to be able to get an opportunity.

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2/22/2017 8:52 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/22/2017 1:06 PM

It's like anything in life. It's who you know sometimes. Takes some kind of connection for an opportunity.

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2/22/2017 9:08 AM

dcorbett62 wrote:

i've always loved the idea of getting in the industry. i'm young, i just have such a passion for the sport. even driving for a team or smaller team would be awesome, i have experience driving and my class A CDL. im also a realist at the same time and it's a shame you have to know someone to be able to get an opportunity.

What ever you do don't take a job driving for team Tedder or your passion for the sport will be gone.

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Ed Johnson

2/22/2017 9:33 AM

dcorbett62 wrote:

i've always loved the idea of getting in the industry. i'm young, i just have such a passion for the sport. even driving for a team or smaller team would be awesome, i have experience driving and my class A CDL. im also a realist at the same time and it's a shame you have to know someone to be able to get an opportunity.

lostboy819 wrote:

What ever you do don't take a job driving for team Tedder or your passion for the sport will be gone.

whys that

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2/22/2017 9:39 AM

i worked in the industry here from ages 18 to 37 in wholesale, and retail, and then for a distributer, left a couple of years ago and moved into the construction industry,

i enjoy my racing much more now than when i did for the last 5 years of working in the industry, like those said above, the pay is not great for all but a few position or if you own the business, you get burnt out from being around bikes, and having to talk shop when you are out riding as well, and sometimes you just want to go do something else,

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2/22/2017 9:43 AM

A good friend of mine is a goggle guy. He's single with no kids and spends every weekend during supercross and outdoors at the races. He gets to come home between races some weeks but all of our riding group is working so if he rides, he's going solo. If you like riding, find something outside of the industry.

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2/22/2017 9:45 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/22/2017 9:46 AM

dcorbett62 wrote:

i've always loved the idea of getting in the industry. i'm young, i just have such a passion for the sport. even driving for a team or smaller team would be awesome, i have experience driving and my class A CDL. im also a realist at the same time and it's a shame you have to know someone to be able to get an opportunity.

lostboy819 wrote:

What ever you do don't take a job driving for team Tedder or your passion for the sport will be gone.

dcorbett62 wrote:

whys that

They treat their driver/ workers like dirt. more of a low talent family race team. It rare for them to keep a driver for a full season , they go through several a year some years.

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Ed Johnson

2/22/2017 9:49 AM

lostboy819 wrote:

They treat their driver/ workers like dirt. more of a low talent family race team. It rare for them to keep a driver for a full season , they go through several a year some years.

I've heard the same. I applied for a spot with them a few years ago and someone shot me note saying to bail for a various number of reasons I won't post. Glad I listened.

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2/22/2017 10:26 AM

Man, some of you sure like to add negativity to any room you walk into. I'm not sure I see the attraction of doing that.

If you have a passion for it? Go for it.

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2/22/2017 10:44 AM

It also depends on what part of the industry you want to work in. Some areas of the industry are difficult to pull a profit from, others are highly profitable. If you get a job with a big company that happens to be involved in moto, like I did, it is just like any other job, except motorcycles.

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I can do anything, I'm an expert.
MotoTribology.com - Motorcycle Lubrication Education

2/22/2017 10:54 AM

The MX industry is small and to get into it in any meaningful way you pretty much need to know someone that is in it already. However if you want it bad enough and willing to do the work necessary you will find a way those with a passion for their given desire always do so get focused and have at it.

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2/22/2017 11:14 AM

There's always jobs available. Took me 10 seconds to find job openings at TLD, Leatt, Ducati, Intense(MTB ), Scott, Klim and 509.
Those are currently posted on Malaye, which is an action sports job site:
https://www.malakye.com/jobs?SortOrder=0&Keyword=moto&Country=0
Photo

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2/22/2017 11:41 AM

Race Tech is currently hiring two technicians (one entry level - no experience necessary, just a good attitude and desire to learn). If you're interested, send a resume to chris@racetech.com. It's full time and located in Corona, CA.

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Race Tech Director of Marketing
www.racetech.com
Proud supporters of VitalMX. Ask me about the VitalMX Discount!

2/22/2017 11:52 AM

I've spent a career in the motorcycle industry, first at a dealership, then at a few smaller companies and now at an OEM.
There's good and bad to any industry job, of course. Although I love it, the pay is not what I'd be making anywhere else, for doing what I do.

Here are the good things:
-You'll meet great people and have some exciting things to look forward to. I've spoken to Bob Hannah on the phone, seen pre-production motorcycles at a test track in Japan, stood on the floor at the Las Vegas and Phoenix Supercrosses, and had face-to face conversations with factory riders, industry giants, Monster girls, etc. If you like the glamour, it's awesome - just remember that stuff gets old.
-You'll get the hook up. I've had more swag and discounted stuff than I can add up. Now I'm in a position where it's unethical to accept any of that, so I have to buy it. It blows my mind what the retail is on a bottle of oil! Of course, my company has an employee purchase plan if I want a motorcycle. It's good, that's all I'm saying.
-You may get to travel. Not so much at the dealer level, but at a supplier position you might go to the trade shows or your company's vendors. I've been to Japan, Germany, and all over the United States because of my job.

Some of the bad things:
-It's a darn good thing I get discounts on motorcycles, because I could never afford one otherwise.
-I'm kind of stuck in the industry now. A few years ago, before my current gig, I tried to get hired on at a "regular" job. They loved my skills, thought I would be a great fit for the position, and then when they heard how much I was accustomed to making, they passed because they wanted someone in a higher pay grade. (I wondered how the hell am I supposed to get there if I don't get hired into that kind of job???) For the record, anyone doing what I do in the industry I was looking at would be in a $100K+ range. I'm nowhere near that.
-Motorcycles are the first thing that goes away when the economy gets bad, and the last to come back when it gets good again. The job security isn't what it would be at a doctor's office, grocery store, or major oil company.

Good luck if you go for it. Like anything else, work hard and you'll go far.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

2/22/2017 11:55 AM

If you want to have fun get a job in the motorcycle industry. If you want to make some money with good benefits get a real job.

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2/22/2017 12:09 PM

Falcon wrote:

I've spent a career in the motorcycle industry, first at a dealership, then at a few smaller companies and now at an OEM.
There's good and bad to any industry job, of course. Although I love it, the pay is not what I'd be making anywhere else, for doing what I do.

Here are the good things:
-You'll meet great people and have some exciting things to look forward to. I've spoken to Bob Hannah on the phone, seen pre-production motorcycles at a test track in Japan, stood on the floor at the Las Vegas and Phoenix Supercrosses, and had face-to face conversations with factory riders, industry giants, Monster girls, etc. If you like the glamour, it's awesome - just remember that stuff gets old.
-You'll get the hook up. I've had more swag and discounted stuff than I can add up. Now I'm in a position where it's unethical to accept any of that, so I have to buy it. It blows my mind what the retail is on a bottle of oil! Of course, my company has an employee purchase plan if I want a motorcycle. It's good, that's all I'm saying.
-You may get to travel. Not so much at the dealer level, but at a supplier position you might go to the trade shows or your company's vendors. I've been to Japan, Germany, and all over the United States because of my job.

Some of the bad things:
-It's a darn good thing I get discounts on motorcycles, because I could never afford one otherwise.
-I'm kind of stuck in the industry now. A few years ago, before my current gig, I tried to get hired on at a "regular" job. They loved my skills, thought I would be a great fit for the position, and then when they heard how much I was accustomed to making, they passed because they wanted someone in a higher pay grade. (I wondered how the hell am I supposed to get there if I don't get hired into that kind of job???) For the record, anyone doing what I do in the industry I was looking at would be in a $100K+ range. I'm nowhere near that.
-Motorcycles are the first thing that goes away when the economy gets bad, and the last to come back when it gets good again. The job security isn't what it would be at a doctor's office, grocery store, or major oil company.

Good luck if you go for it. Like anything else, work hard and you'll go far.

So you're saying KTM doesn't pay so great? wink

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2/22/2017 12:48 PM

Falcon wrote:

I've spent a career in the motorcycle industry, first at a dealership, then at a few smaller companies and now at an OEM.
There's good and bad to any industry job, of course. Although I love it, the pay is not what I'd be making anywhere else, for doing what I do.

Here are the good things:
-You'll meet great people and have some exciting things to look forward to. I've spoken to Bob Hannah on the phone, seen pre-production motorcycles at a test track in Japan, stood on the floor at the Las Vegas and Phoenix Supercrosses, and had face-to face conversations with factory riders, industry giants, Monster girls, etc. If you like the glamour, it's awesome - just remember that stuff gets old.
-You'll get the hook up. I've had more swag and discounted stuff than I can add up. Now I'm in a position where it's unethical to accept any of that, so I have to buy it. It blows my mind what the retail is on a bottle of oil! Of course, my company has an employee purchase plan if I want a motorcycle. It's good, that's all I'm saying.
-You may get to travel. Not so much at the dealer level, but at a supplier position you might go to the trade shows or your company's vendors. I've been to Japan, Germany, and all over the United States because of my job.

Some of the bad things:
-It's a darn good thing I get discounts on motorcycles, because I could never afford one otherwise.
-I'm kind of stuck in the industry now. A few years ago, before my current gig, I tried to get hired on at a "regular" job. They loved my skills, thought I would be a great fit for the position, and then when they heard how much I was accustomed to making, they passed because they wanted someone in a higher pay grade. (I wondered how the hell am I supposed to get there if I don't get hired into that kind of job???) For the record, anyone doing what I do in the industry I was looking at would be in a $100K+ range. I'm nowhere near that.
-Motorcycles are the first thing that goes away when the economy gets bad, and the last to come back when it gets good again. The job security isn't what it would be at a doctor's office, grocery store, or major oil company.

Good luck if you go for it. Like anything else, work hard and you'll go far.

I also worked in the industry for my career. What "Falcon" wrote is so true, I agree with everything he said. I am retired now and feel very lucky that I got out of the industry and sold my dealership when I did. The industry is only going to continue to under perform. Many long time friends that have worked in the industry for their career are now unemployed. There are many reasons why the industry is failing, but the main one is most young people do not care about owning a motorcycle and the ones that do can not afford it. Sad but true.

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2/22/2017 1:18 PM

GuyB wrote:

Man, some of you sure like to add negativity to any room you walk into. I'm not sure I see the attraction of doing that.

If you have a passion for it? Go for it.

But there are some jobs in the "industry" you want to avoid. I worked in the industry for 30 years and when you are young and want to be involved its cool but the money is not very good but it can be fun. As you get older it may be better to work outside of the industry and make better money so you can afford to participate and it won't kill your passion for the sport. Been there done that. sad

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Ed Johnson

2/22/2017 1:32 PM

I landed my industry job with one of the big four at the age of 41 after trying to get in for nearly 20 years. I just celebrated my 10 year anniversary I absolutely love working here. I am surrounded by like minded people every day at work and I get to be around products that I really enjoy. I have not soured on motorcycles and I still enjoy racing vintage MX. If all goes well I plan on being here until I retire. I say go for it.

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Bret Bonham