Michelin mousse fitment

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10/28/2021 7:34 AM

Hello all,

So I ordered an M18 mousse to go in an a 120/90-18 tire because the Rocky Mountain fitment guide said it would work. But when I received the mousse, the Michelin brochure said the M18 was made specifically for some of their own tires and that other tires would require the M14. Anyone know the difference between the M18 and M14? The M18 does look larger than the 14, but a 14 is made to also fit a 110 tire. So, it should be smaller than the 18.

Thanks

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10/28/2021 7:50 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/28/2021 7:55 AM

I’ve run Michelin tires for years.
Their sizing is unique to say the least.
For some reason the European metric system Michelin uses does not match the Asian metric system everyone else uses so you can’t use tire sizing across brands.

As far as running Michelin mousse’s, if you’re not matching it to a Michelin tire I’d return it and go with the Nitro mousse or similar.
Otherwise prepare for trial and error as you attempt to get the right size Michelin mousse matched to your non Michelin tire.

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10/28/2021 7:51 AM

What tire are you putting it in? I would cross reference a Starcross 5 nitro mousse size with the nitro mousse size for the tire you want to use and see if they call for the same size mousse.

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10/28/2021 8:20 AM

Thanks for the replies. I'm putting it in the Tusk 120/90-18. I'll probably just send it back and get the M14. The M18 looks like more than I want to put in there.

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10/28/2021 8:23 AM

just_gonna_send_it wrote:

Thanks for the replies. I'm putting it in the Tusk 120/90-18. I'll probably just send it back and get the M14. The M18 looks ...more

If you are gonna send it back anyway I'd probably go with a Nitro Mousse as suggested above.

Michelin makes a great Mousse but it is the best paired with their tires.

OR just order up some Michelin tires....they are giving back $25 on every tire purchased in October.

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10/28/2021 10:58 AM

just_gonna_send_it wrote:

Thanks for the replies. I'm putting it in the Tusk 120/90-18. I'll probably just send it back and get the M14. The M18 looks ...more

LungButter wrote:

If you are gonna send it back anyway I'd probably go with a Nitro Mousse as suggested above.

Michelin makes a great Mousse ...more

May do that too.

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10/28/2021 11:44 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/28/2021 11:45 AM

just_gonna_send_it wrote:

May do that too.

I deal with mousses all the time (like every day lol).
Measure the girth of the mousse using a flexible tape measure (like the kind used to set sag, or a vinyl sewing tape measure). The girth (circumference around the cross section) should be about 300mm for a 120/90-18 tire. If it's 10-15mm bigger or smaller than 300mm it won't fit properly.

I cram mousses into the tires. If the mounting process was easy, it's probalby too loose.

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10/28/2021 12:54 PM

I fit an m18 into a 120 Kenda or a 110 AT81.

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10/28/2021 1:01 PM

I've been going through the learning process with mousse's over the past 6 months as I am transitioning to off-road racing from moto. I'm repeating the correct info others have already stated above.

First off - Michelin Mousse's don't fit other brands. Michelin tires have a big carcass from what I can tell. Tried a Michelin mousse in Dunlops, Pirelli's and a Tusk with no luck.

Second - Michelin tires hook up decent last a LONG time. I've been running Starcross 5 Mediums primarily in the dry, rocky desert and I can get a solid 8-10 hours of aggressive expert level riding out of a set. I find the front is worn whenever the rear knobs are getting low. These tires do not chunk knobs like Dunlops do. I get about 3-4 hours out of a Dunlop rear and 5-6 out of a front with these conditions.

Third - I use a Rabaconda tire changer, and Xeno is 100% right - if it goes on easy it probably doesn't fit right. The key to mousse's lasting a decent amount of time is lube and making sure it's tight inside the tire. If there is room for it to move around it's not going to hold up long at all. Plus if it's a bit stiffer when it's new, you're going to get more time out of it before the mousse starts to feel soft and is replicating low tire pressure. When the mousse goes soft you start to get tire roll and handling goes to shit.

Hope that gives some insight. I've learned a lot on this subject in the last 6 months.

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10/28/2021 1:18 PM

I could be wrong here... But seem to recall it’s the aspect ratio that is different among the euro brands ( Michelin, Pirelli)? Personally I like a taller sidewall for off-road-less chance for pinch flats. Following this thread as I hate flat tires and want to go mousse this winter.

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10/29/2021 7:07 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/29/2021 7:08 AM

Really appreciate all the responses. I'm just learning the ropes. I do agree with the above that if it goes in easy, it probably not fitting right. Last night I installed an M14 into a 110/100-18 Pirelli XC mid-hard. It was a challenge, to say the least. I seem to be very competent until the last third of the last bead. The only way I could get it on was to put a clamp on the opposite side of the tire to push the tire into the center of the rim. Even then, I still rolled the bead and had to really mess with it to get it unrolled. Wasn't the most elegant thing I've ever done. Any pieces of advice are welcomed!

I do use a Rabaconda by the way. Love it.

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10/29/2021 7:58 AM

My experience - Ive ran Michelin and Nitro mousses over the past several years. I used to think that Nitro was the best thing since sliced bread because they fit alot better and were easier to mount. Last year I picked up a new bike and the dealership gave me a set of Michelin mousses. I got about 60 hrs on the Michelin and they are still usable. Never got that out of a Nitro, not even close. The Michelin rear was extremely tight to the point I had to take it to a buddy for help on my first tire changes even with several years experience installing mousses (nitro) but the feel was good even when new. A local dealership only had Nitros this last time so I picked up a set and have ran them for two races and they are so stiff I was getting bounced all over the place. I swapped tires and they are already forming to the rim which the Michelin do not do after about 6hrs. That being said, I put my 60hr Michelin in my spare wheel set and have no issue running then. All that to say this, going forward I plan to stick with Michelin as I think they are a better mousse. These were all installed in Kenda 110 rears and 80/100 fronts. I cant remember specifically but I think the rear was the M18.

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10/29/2021 8:56 AM

mattman631 wrote:

My experience - Ive ran Michelin and Nitro mousses over the past several years. I used to think that Nitro was the best thing ...more

Yeah I agree with you. I think Michelin are the best. Will probably stick with them. Maybe even start using Michelin tires so I know I have the right fitment. When I'm struggling with an install it's always in the back of my head, "do I have the right mousse?"

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10/29/2021 10:30 AM

just_gonna_send_it wrote:

Yeah I agree with you. I think Michelin are the best. Will probably stick with them. Maybe even start using Michelin tires so ...more

A benefit of running Michellin tires with Mousses is that their tires are some of the lightest available so it should help offset the added weight of the Mousse some.

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10/31/2021 8:00 AM

TeamFlannel wrote:

I could be wrong here... But seem to recall it’s the aspect ratio that is different among the euro brands ( Michelin, ...more

Michelin used to be that way but with the Starcross 5 line they started using the standard measuring that everyone else uses.

I also concur that the Michelin mousses last FAR longer than nitro. The new gen ones (blue boxes) are a pain to get in on the first mounting but if you keep them lubed up they just seem to never break down.

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10/31/2021 8:20 AM

Also, are you running the electrical wire counduit gel for the lube on your mousse?

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@ Teamflanneloutdoors
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10/31/2021 8:22 AM

TeamFlannel wrote:

Also, are you running the electrical wire counduit gel for the lube on your mousse?

I only run the Michelin stuff and just buy a case of it every other year or so. My mousses always last forever so I haven't wanted to change my routine.

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11/1/2021 7:53 AM

Used Michelin and NitroMousse over the years. Have had a couple fitment "miscalculations" with each. The fitment chart is nice for the Nitro, but it isn't always perfect, and I've gotten the wrong size sent to me a couple times from each over the years.

I haven't personally noticed much difference in lifespan between brands, but I have noticed that they last a lot longer when its difficult to install because just its a little too big. I.e., Tight is Right

I used to get a case of Michelin lube every year or so, but in the past couple years have started grabbing a tube/tub of Napa or AGS Sil-Glyde. It feels very similar and cost a little more than half of what the Michelin lube does. (The AGS Sil-Glyde you can get in a 12oz tub for $20, very handy and less messy than the tubes IMO) Its marketed for brake caliper/pin rebuilding to reduce squeaking, safe on rubber and such, not temperature sensitive etc., I haven't dug up SDS sheets on the products, to see ingredients, but it feels and performs so similar I'd wager the difference between whatever Michelin and NitroMousse are selling is virtually identical.

For what its worth, on my latest rear bib, I grabbed a 100/100-18 Michelin bib (M18) and installed it in a Kenda Washougal 2 DC, 110/100-18. VERY TIGHT. That tire is done a month later (6 very rocky/hardpacked races, a play ride and approx. 450 miles) The bib was still very tight and the tire was hard to remove. I installed a 110/100-18 Dunlop MX33. Slipped on like butter and feels "normal". I'd heard that Kenda's run a bit small, and I guess this validates that rumor.

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