Marshall Problem

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7/25/2019 5:11 AM

In the UK it seems anyone can turn up and marshall at any event... I think marshalls at events should be licensed and fully trained

The pic below infuriates me that this guy can turn up 15 mins before the race starts, be trained in 15 mins and then be in control of so many peoples safety and well-being...

There has been some SERIOUS accidents caused by incompetent marshalls, many injuries and I even know of worse than injuries...


What's you opinion?

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Braaaaaaaap!!

7/25/2019 5:17 AM

So, what is considered "worse than injury"? asking for a friend.

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7/25/2019 5:25 AM

What does this Marshall do that makes him/her responsible for the safety of others?

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7/25/2019 5:39 AM

If i remember correctly, dungey marshalled at millville in 17 or 18 and said on tv hes not even sure what a marshall does.

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7/25/2019 5:56 AM

Just a guess, but is the "English to English" translation of Marshall a Flagger?

If so, this makes a little bit more sense as it isn't really rocked science. The responder to the post may actually be known to the original poster and has done it before, and maybe just needs to know which area he is covering, etc.

Now if flaggers need to be trained and licensed at every event, get ready for riding to become exponentially more expensive. And the worst complainers about flaggers are probably also going to be the worst complainers about the costs......

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7/25/2019 6:35 AM

Been done this way in the US for decades at local races. Kids could make a few bucks and watch / work the races with no problems. The issue is the riders most of the time; when I see a yellow flag I immediately ease up and look around for the downed rider, but today so many riders ignore the flags and keep racing as if it weren’t even there.

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7/25/2019 6:39 AM

Graybeard wrote:

Been done this way in the US for decades at local races. Kids could make a few bucks and watch / work the races with no problems. The issue is the riders most of the time; when I see a yellow flag I immediately ease up and look around for the downed rider, but today so many riders ignore the flags and keep racing as if it weren’t even there.

Growing up we were not allowed to pass on a yellow.

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7/25/2019 6:54 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/25/2019 6:54 AM

I was at High Point a few years back and the flagger we were standing by before practice started was absolutely clueless. My buddy and I who have been racing all our lives had to explain to him how to do his job. Guy was a local and raced the GNCC there. No idea how he got the gig.

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7/25/2019 7:22 AM

But I bet you wouldn't want to pay a higher race entry fee would you?
Skilled/trained labour commands a higher hourly rate. Times that by 25 guys, you're looking at a big increase. Get your wallet out.

That said, like someone else says- its hardly rocket science.
Anybody not staying alert and holding the flag out when needed for sure needs to be removed from the job. But if they're alert, getting he flag out quickly... what more do you actually want/expect?

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7/25/2019 7:26 AM

Lifeguards make $10 an hour. Basic BLS and take a waterfront safety course for $275.

That’s not highly skilled labor. what are flaggers making 8-10/hr? It’s not unreasonable to get them certified. Except for the fact that nobody is going to get certified if they’re gonna work one day a year. at least with a lifeguard you can work 40 hour a week.

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GP740
Since 1987

7/25/2019 7:37 AM

Pro races are a different animal, but I've flagged local races many times. The training shouldn't take more than 1 minute.

1. Constantly watch between where you're standing and the next flagger
2. Wave flag if a rider is down in this area

I really struggled with step 1. Standing in the hot sun for 6-8 hours causes my brain to think about all kinds of crazy stuff, to the point where I would completely zone out.

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7/25/2019 7:41 AM

Thisusernameisavailable wrote:

But I bet you wouldn't want to pay a higher race entry fee would you?
Skilled/trained labour commands a higher hourly rate. Times that by 25 guys, you're looking at a big increase. Get your wallet out.

That said, like someone else says- its hardly rocket science.
Anybody not staying alert and holding the flag out when needed for sure needs to be removed from the job. But if they're alert, getting he flag out quickly... what more do you actually want/expect?

Yes I would. Hence why I opt for more expensive helmets, boots, protective gear. Budget isn't the issue, safety is

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Braaaaaaaap!!

7/25/2019 8:00 AM

Carlton_Fartman wrote:

Pro races are a different animal, but I've flagged local races many times. The training shouldn't take more than 1 minute.

1. Constantly watch between where you're standing and the next flagger
2. Wave flag if a rider is down in this area

I really struggled with step 1. Standing in the hot sun for 6-8 hours causes my brain to think about all kinds of crazy stuff, to the point where I would completely zone out.

There's different types of people though, you have common sense and take the job seriously, whilst I've seen people on phone calls, sleeping etc

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Braaaaaaaap!!

7/25/2019 8:03 AM

Graybeard wrote:

Been done this way in the US for decades at local races. Kids could make a few bucks and watch / work the races with no problems. The issue is the riders most of the time; when I see a yellow flag I immediately ease up and look around for the downed rider, but today so many riders ignore the flags and keep racing as if it weren’t even there.

Yes that's the flip side of it, can have the best Flagger in the world but if the rider doesn't obey the flagger then that's just as much a problem as a bad flagger

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Braaaaaaaap!!

7/25/2019 8:17 AM

People often don't agree with me on this, but I feel like races are "over flagged". A jump where you can't see the landing? Hell yeah, wave the flag if someone is down at the landing. The problem is, if a rider stalls in the corner waaaay after the landing, the flagger is expected to wave the flag. So many times the flags are out it has nothing to do with the jump the flag is out at, so people jump anyways.

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7/26/2019 9:12 AM

It's rare that I've even seen a flag that mattered. Most of the time, I already know there's a crash because I'm looking at the track ahead. I've also been confused a few times by flaggers standing there with their flags hanging into my face as I round a corner, only to find there's no obstruction on the track. They were just standing there watching and didn't bother to hide the flag; just left it draped into the track area.

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Braaapin' aint easy.