MXA interview with Ryan Dungey

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11/1/2017 10:52 PM

The latest issue of MXA has a great interview with Dungey. The truth on why he retired. Very honest. I respect him even more now than I did. Smart man. It's not on line yet, though. Just in the mag.

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11/1/2017 11:40 PM

Care to elaborate?

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11/2/2017 5:13 AM

I agree, it is a great interview.

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11/2/2017 5:23 AM

fanger wrote:

Care to elaborate?

x2, are you trying to boost MXA mag sales by being this vague, lol

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11/2/2017 10:13 AM

Cancerman wrote:

The latest issue of MXA has a great interview with Dungey. The truth on why he retired. Very honest. I respect him even more now than I did. Smart man. It's not on line yet, though. Just in the mag.

It was a really good interview. They had one with josh grant a few issues ago that was really good too. When Dungey said his '11 rmz450 was junk that kind of took me back. It seems like he couldve had the same bike that he won his championships on in 2010. Maybe when roger and ian harrison left the bike just wasnt the same? That kind of took me by surprise.

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11/2/2017 10:20 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/2/2017 10:21 AM

I think he had said in another interview that he was just not into racing anymore. The pressure to win was just too great. Some of the tracks scared him, and he was just done.

I get it. Pressure is a scary thing. So is straight up being scared. I get nervous to race too. And looking at some of the jumps can be very intimidating.

Dungy already got all the money/fame/trophies anyone would ever need. He didnt need to put himself in that position anymore. He wasnt hungry anymore for it. I wouldnt have been either at his level. Now he can just sit back and ride out the fame for a few years, then step back into a team or into the broadcasting side like alot of the former champs do. RV seems to be due to get a job in the booth or on the ground like RC. Its like they hang back for a few years then need to float back in for a pay check or because they want the fame again.

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11/2/2017 10:26 AM

Cancerman wrote:

The latest issue of MXA has a great interview with Dungey. The truth on why he retired. Very honest. I respect him even more now than I did. Smart man. It's not on line yet, though. Just in the mag.

mxjon454 wrote:

It was a really good interview. They had one with josh grant a few issues ago that was really good too. When Dungey said his '11 rmz450 was junk that kind of took me back. It seems like he couldve had the same bike that he won his championships on in 2010. Maybe when roger and ian harrison left the bike just wasnt the same? That kind of took me by surprise.

2011 was a tough year. When Roger and Ian left and budget cuts, the team went to crap.

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11/2/2017 10:40 AM

Legend,. Top 5 of all time.

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11/2/2017 11:40 AM

Cancerman wrote:

The latest issue of MXA has a great interview with Dungey. The truth on why he retired. Very honest. I respect him even more now than I did. Smart man. It's not on line yet, though. Just in the mag.

mxjon454 wrote:

It was a really good interview. They had one with josh grant a few issues ago that was really good too. When Dungey said his '11 rmz450 was junk that kind of took me back. It seems like he couldve had the same bike that he won his championships on in 2010. Maybe when roger and ian harrison left the bike just wasnt the same? That kind of took me by surprise.

Wandell wrote:

2011 was a tough year. When Roger and Ian left and budget cuts, the team went to crap.

Yaa its crazy to think how quickly something can change like that. And if he didnt lose a chain in sx in 2011 he wouldve won that championship and if he didnt run out of gas at the texas national in 2011 he wouldve won that title too. With all those changes and the bike not being that great, he still wouldve backed both titles if he didnt have those 2 freak accidents.

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11/2/2017 2:13 PM

mxjon454 wrote:

It was a really good interview. They had one with josh grant a few issues ago that was really good too. When Dungey said his '11 rmz450 was junk that kind of took me back. It seems like he couldve had the same bike that he won his championships on in 2010. Maybe when roger and ian harrison left the bike just wasnt the same? That kind of took me by surprise.

Wandell wrote:

2011 was a tough year. When Roger and Ian left and budget cuts, the team went to crap.

mxjon454 wrote:

Yaa its crazy to think how quickly something can change like that. And if he didnt lose a chain in sx in 2011 he wouldve won that championship and if he didnt run out of gas at the texas national in 2011 he wouldve won that title too. With all those changes and the bike not being that great, he still wouldve backed both titles if he didnt have those 2 freak accidents.

Same year he missed the start at Southwick I think

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A 350 is always the solution.
My favorite time of year is when the biblical rains come to Southern California

11/2/2017 3:08 PM

The word "scared" is rarely heard from single racers, mostly married at that level of racing. As the saying goes, you lose a tenth for every major injury, a half second for getting married, and a full second after you have a kid.

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Die Antwoord

11/2/2017 7:23 PM

He also stated that the intensity of racing at that level, and the focus required to not make a mistake that could end your career, was just getting too high. He felt Ryan Vilopoto was the one that forced everyone to step up their game. He felt he could not find the focus required to continue. He also said he had a couple of very close calls during 2017, which made his mind up for him. He felt he was at his peak and was not going to get any faster. Another title would have been difficult to achieve. It was time to enjoy other things in life. But he did say it is taking awhile for him to deal with not racing anymore professionally. He said he will stay close to racing, but in what capacity, he's not sure of. I noticed he was in the pits at a couple outdoors races and was helping the KTM crew set things up. Incognito, in a full beard.

Another tid bit, he said when he started with Suzuki, he knew nothing about bike set up. Very insightful, IMHO.

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11/3/2017 1:04 AM

It can't be good when a champ is intimated by the tracks. Safer tracks make better racing

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11/3/2017 2:32 AM

Jrewing wrote:

It can't be good when a champ is intimated by the tracks. Safer tracks make better racing

But how are they more difficult than say 10-15 years ago? The tracks still have triples, tabletops and different rhythms like they always have. Feels like nowadays the jumps are better built, is'int that a good thing?

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11/3/2017 4:12 AM

No one wants these guys to ever call it quits but I totally get why they do. Very few are able to walk away with their health AND a pile of cash. Dungey was a flat out STUD!

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11/3/2017 4:34 AM

gt80rider wrote:

The word "scared" is rarely heard from single racers, mostly married at that level of racing. As the saying goes, you lose a tenth for every major injury, a half second for getting married, and a full second after you have a kid.

Tell that to Osborn. tongue

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11/3/2017 4:35 AM

motomike137 wrote:

No one wants these guys to ever call it quits but I totally get why they do. Very few are able to walk away with their health AND a pile of cash. Dungey was a flat out STUD!

This. I never realized how bad things were with the team in 2011.....still he almost won it all. Great racer and role model.

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11/3/2017 4:56 AM

Jrewing wrote:

It can't be good when a champ is intimated by the tracks. Safer tracks make better racing

pejje wrote:

But how are they more difficult than say 10-15 years ago? The tracks still have triples, tabletops and different rhythms like they always have. Feels like nowadays the jumps are better built, is'int that a good thing?

The culmination of faster bikes and better tracks has pushed the speed of the top guys to a scary level.

Speed kills and no man wants to ride past his comfort level for very long. Deep down he knows the consequences aren't worth the reward.

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11/3/2017 5:33 AM

Jrewing wrote:

It can't be good when a champ is intimated by the tracks. Safer tracks make better racing

pejje wrote:

But how are they more difficult than say 10-15 years ago? The tracks still have triples, tabletops and different rhythms like they always have. Feels like nowadays the jumps are better built, is'int that a good thing?

Not arguing or trying to start one, but I don’t think factory 250 2 strokes from 15 years ago put out the power that the 450’s do now and they def didn’t have the inertia. It’s 500 2 stroke numbers now or more I guess.
Please no local yocals saying “but I ride a 450” or “you don’t have to use all the power”.

Btw, I’m getting rid of a 250 2 stroke for a 250f so I’m not really biased. Its just obvious imo.

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11/3/2017 5:58 AM

mxjon454 wrote:

It was a really good interview. They had one with josh grant a few issues ago that was really good too. When Dungey said his '11 rmz450 was junk that kind of took me back. It seems like he couldve had the same bike that he won his championships on in 2010. Maybe when roger and ian harrison left the bike just wasnt the same? That kind of took me by surprise.

Wandell wrote:

2011 was a tough year. When Roger and Ian left and budget cuts, the team went to crap.

mxjon454 wrote:

Yaa its crazy to think how quickly something can change like that. And if he didnt lose a chain in sx in 2011 he wouldve won that championship and if he didnt run out of gas at the texas national in 2011 he wouldve won that title too. With all those changes and the bike not being that great, he still wouldve backed both titles if he didnt have those 2 freak accidents.

But aren't both those "freak accidents" emblematic of ways the bike and team's attention to detail might not have been up to snuff?

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11/3/2017 6:43 AM

Wandell wrote:

2011 was a tough year. When Roger and Ian left and budget cuts, the team went to crap.

mxjon454 wrote:

Yaa its crazy to think how quickly something can change like that. And if he didnt lose a chain in sx in 2011 he wouldve won that championship and if he didnt run out of gas at the texas national in 2011 he wouldve won that title too. With all those changes and the bike not being that great, he still wouldve backed both titles if he didnt have those 2 freak accidents.

MichaelAndrew93 wrote:

Same year he missed the start at Southwick I think

Yep, it sure was.

I remember he walked right past me at Freestone after his bike died, He was pushing his bike, in 100+ degree heat, with his helmet on, and he looked soooo pissed and fired up. Between Freestone and southwick, it was a freak year, yet he still came within a few points or winning.

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11/3/2017 6:51 AM

Jrewing wrote:

It can't be good when a champ is intimated by the tracks. Safer tracks make better racing

pejje wrote:

But how are they more difficult than say 10-15 years ago? The tracks still have triples, tabletops and different rhythms like they always have. Feels like nowadays the jumps are better built, is'int that a good thing?

The bikes are so fast now with so much torque compared to those days. Rhythm sections that no one would even consider on a 2 stroke are now done regularly. Remember the rhythm section at Glendale that Dungey wouldn't jump? Go back and watch if not. That's a section that he clearly didn't want to jump and it cost him. Another example was Windham at Anaheim when he retired. There was a huge quad out of a rhythm section that the top ten guys were all doing. KW said "no thanks" and realized it was time. The bikes have made nearly any combination possible and sometimes it's a bit scary when someone puts a huge combo together and you know you have to jump it to do well.

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11/3/2017 9:27 AM

Cancerman wrote:

He also stated that the intensity of racing at that level, and the focus required to not make a mistake that could end your career, was just getting too high. He felt Ryan Vilopoto was the one that forced everyone to step up their game. He felt he could not find the focus required to continue. He also said he had a couple of very close calls during 2017, which made his mind up for him. He felt he was at his peak and was not going to get any faster. Another title would have been difficult to achieve. It was time to enjoy other things in life. But he did say it is taking awhile for him to deal with not racing anymore professionally. He said he will stay close to racing, but in what capacity, he's not sure of. I noticed he was in the pits at a couple outdoors races and was helping the KTM crew set things up. Incognito, in a full beard.

Another tid bit, he said when he started with Suzuki, he knew nothing about bike set up. Very insightful, IMHO.

And yet, the 2017 outdoor title would been the easiest of his career.

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11/3/2017 10:09 AM

Jrewing wrote:

It can't be good when a champ is intimated by the tracks. Safer tracks make better racing

pejje wrote:

But how are they more difficult than say 10-15 years ago? The tracks still have triples, tabletops and different rhythms like they always have. Feels like nowadays the jumps are better built, is'int that a good thing?

Jt$ wrote:

The bikes are so fast now with so much torque compared to those days. Rhythm sections that no one would even consider on a 2 stroke are now done regularly. Remember the rhythm section at Glendale that Dungey wouldn't jump? Go back and watch if not. That's a section that he clearly didn't want to jump and it cost him. Another example was Windham at Anaheim when he retired. There was a huge quad out of a rhythm section that the top ten guys were all doing. KW said "no thanks" and realized it was time. The bikes have made nearly any combination possible and sometimes it's a bit scary when someone puts a huge combo together and you know you have to jump it to do well.

My opinion of course but this says it all...the bikes are stupid. When someone dumps it in a corner, gets up at the exit of the corner, starts the bike and proceeds to hit the triple/finish line jump then it's time to back off on the power(size).

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11/3/2017 11:01 AM

Amazing that he would of won both titles in 2011 if it wasn't for freak mechanical problems. That team was such a mess that year salvaging parts and with the main guys leaving for KTM. Then he leaves for KTM basically taking 3 years off his career to ride an underdeveloped bike. Wasn't a fan of that move.

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11/3/2017 3:39 PM

Everything is better/faster now. Speeds are higher so the stakes are also higher if you crash. One small lapse and you could end your career. Roczen easily could have ended his this year, he may never be competitive again for all we know. I hope that isn't true. I think Ryan saw what was ahead and said No Thanks, I have my rings, legacy and his health and decided to go out his way. The Eli lovers said he was afraid of Eli, I think that is nonsense. Dungey knew damn well he could mentally defeat Tomac by the end of a season, and he did. He was/is far smarter than the average rider.

Look out if he ever figures out how to train or manage riders or a team. If he figures it out he will have more championships to his credit.

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11/3/2017 4:26 PM

pejje wrote:

But how are they more difficult than say 10-15 years ago? The tracks still have triples, tabletops and different rhythms like they always have. Feels like nowadays the jumps are better built, is'int that a good thing?

Jt$ wrote:

The bikes are so fast now with so much torque compared to those days. Rhythm sections that no one would even consider on a 2 stroke are now done regularly. Remember the rhythm section at Glendale that Dungey wouldn't jump? Go back and watch if not. That's a section that he clearly didn't want to jump and it cost him. Another example was Windham at Anaheim when he retired. There was a huge quad out of a rhythm section that the top ten guys were all doing. KW said "no thanks" and realized it was time. The bikes have made nearly any combination possible and sometimes it's a bit scary when someone puts a huge combo together and you know you have to jump it to do well.

seth505 wrote:

My opinion of course but this says it all...the bikes are stupid. When someone dumps it in a corner, gets up at the exit of the corner, starts the bike and proceeds to hit the triple/finish line jump then it's time to back off on the power(size).

Or...maybe its time to build bigger jumps? whistling ermm unsure

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11/3/2017 4:41 PM

Jt$ wrote:

The bikes are so fast now with so much torque compared to those days. Rhythm sections that no one would even consider on a 2 stroke are now done regularly. Remember the rhythm section at Glendale that Dungey wouldn't jump? Go back and watch if not. That's a section that he clearly didn't want to jump and it cost him. Another example was Windham at Anaheim when he retired. There was a huge quad out of a rhythm section that the top ten guys were all doing. KW said "no thanks" and realized it was time. The bikes have made nearly any combination possible and sometimes it's a bit scary when someone puts a huge combo together and you know you have to jump it to do well.

This

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11/3/2017 5:09 PM

Dungey is a smart man. He walked away on top with his health before he too became disposable like a used Red Bull can. Very few leave the sport that way. Whether we like it or not, SX/MX is the Gladiators vs. the Lions. There is a reason TV ads are full of crash highlights. Football players and Rodeo Cowboys have a longer career expectancy.

The only potential defending champion has screws in his ankle. The wounded list is already long for the next season and it hasn't started. Those that do make the start will have plenty of scars and rods and screws. The tracks need to be tamed down IMO. It is not OK to consistently have professional's, no matter what they get paid, have to compete on tracks that require perilous risks throughout the season.



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2015 Beta 500 RS, history: 99 KTM 300, 87 CR250, 84 KLR 600, 82 GPZ 550, 81 KX 250, 80 KX 250, 79 Montesa 414 VE, 78 250 VB, 77 360 VB, 76 360 VA, 75 YZ 125, 74 TM 125, 72 TS 125, 60's West Bend Go Boy Kart

11/3/2017 5:23 PM

Cancerman wrote:

The latest issue of MXA has a great interview with Dungey. The truth on why he retired. Very honest. I respect him even more now than I did. Smart man. It's not on line yet, though. Just in the mag.

Yeah it's damn good! Solid 10 to MXA on that one.

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2013 KTM 450SXF, 1983 YZ 250K, & 1983 CR 250