MX noob in Oregon

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7/30/2017 11:03 PM

Does this website not have regional forums?.. oh well, here goes...
I live near Portland, Oregon and I've only ridden trails so far, I love it.. but after checking out Thursday night mx at PIR and Mt. View MX, I've decided I want to ride on a track. I'm not getting all hyped up about it like I'll be any good.. I just want to be able to fit in on the practice days we have at the tracks around here.
Problem is, the 'practice' days seem pretty serious to a total mx noob. I would definitely not feel comfortable just lining up with 20 other dudes and hitting the throttle. I wish they would let you practice with like 5 guys at a time instead of 20. My first lap around id want to go hella slow, just to get the feel for it, but these guys are ripping it up.
I've been riding for over a year on the trails... I started slow, and now I can ride pretty hard, so I'm not a total noob to dirt bikes.
I'm about to buy a ktm 250 sx. And I want to ride her on the track.
Anyone out this way have any suggestions?

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7/30/2017 11:17 PM

To be honest, don't think about it..
The "fast" Guys gets around you I promise. Go that speed you are comfortable with, and keep your line and don't cross over straights or jumps, you'll be fine smile

If there are huge jumps with blind spots, just take a peek over your shoulder before to see what's coming up behind.

And please,don't go wfo before a jump and brake to an almost stop in the takeoff smile

Most importantly, have fun and hang loose laughing

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7/31/2017 9:35 AM

Kawasaki-rider wrote:

To be honest, don't think about it..
The "fast" Guys gets around you I promise. Go that speed you are comfortable with, and keep your line and don't cross over straights or jumps, you'll be fine smile

If there are huge jumps with blind spots, just take a peek over your shoulder before to see what's coming up behind.

And please,don't go wfo before a jump and brake to an almost stop in the takeoff smile

Most importantly, have fun and hang loose laughing

That's all great advice right there.

Don't try to let guys by-hold your line and be predictable. Focus on what's on front of you.

You might want to show up before gates open so you can pay and be on the track early. Most tracks are less crowded and the track will be less torn up. Some tracks overwater it, though, so it can be goopy.

Most tracks have A,B and C classes go out in turns. That will help you a lot, although many let everyone loose until the track gets too crowded, so that's a strike against my "show up early" strategy. Fast guys will get around you no problem: you just don't want to be traction for them.

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7/31/2017 9:37 AM

Oh, and I don't know about Oregon, but many tracks have an "uninteresting" vet track that might help you learn. Usually less and slower traffic on them. Something else to look into.

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7/31/2017 9:39 AM

In southern California I can usually get a little bit of track time to myself if I show up early and hit the track right at 9 am when they open it up to ride on.

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7/31/2017 9:49 AM

Mountain View...a track near you and a pretty awesome one at that, used to split their practices up into groups based on skill level. I'm guessing they still do. I'd go there.

All the advice above is excellent.

Don't be afraid to ask people questions at the track. That includes staff and other riders.

Have fun...

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7/31/2017 10:38 AM

Mtn View is great because they have practice by ability. Ride the beginner class to start. The biggest thing to learn to ride safe is staying in your line, don't go left and right across the track, this let's the people behind you go around you safely. If you roll the jumps, stay to one side, not the middle.

There's a track north of Portland in a Washington called Riverdale MX. You can ride it any day of the week if you call ahead. They might not prep it super wel mid weekl, but you can get it to yourself. They have a big track and beginner. Could be a great place for you to start.

Call or email Dan
360-749-1170
info@riverdaleraceway.com
http://www.riverdaleraceway.com

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7/31/2017 10:45 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/31/2017 11:02 AM

Just remember this ever-so-important rule while riding on a track with mixed skillsets - HOLD YOUR LINE

Do not weave in-and-out of your line. Faster people behind you will find a way around you. Don't worry about what is behind you. Only worry about holding your line and getting comfortable on the track. More experienced riders are experienced enough to know how to safely pass you. If you start criss-crossing along the track, they have no way to predict this and that is when really bad things happen. This is especially true over jumps. You can often see where the fast line is leading up to a jump, so if you're still getting comfortable, just avoid the fast line and stay in yours.

If you happen to fall over on a blind spot on the track, hi-tail it off the track. Don't worry about your bike. You can usually count on your moto brethren to lend a hand if there aren't flaggers, unless they're tweaker assholes or maniacal no-shirt wearing Native Americans who are only out to kill you with their clapped out 450.

Have fun. You'll love it.

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7/31/2017 11:18 AM

dontstealmybike wrote:

Does this website not have regional forums?.. oh well, here goes...
I live near Portland, Oregon and I've only ridden trails so far, I love it.. but after checking out Thursday night mx at PIR and Mt. View MX, I've decided I want to ride on a track. I'm not getting all hyped up about it like I'll be any good.. I just want to be able to fit in on the practice days we have at the tracks around here.
Problem is, the 'practice' days seem pretty serious to a total mx noob. I would definitely not feel comfortable just lining up with 20 other dudes and hitting the throttle. I wish they would let you practice with like 5 guys at a time instead of 20. My first lap around id want to go hella slow, just to get the feel for it, but these guys are ripping it up.
I've been riding for over a year on the trails... I started slow, and now I can ride pretty hard, so I'm not a total noob to dirt bikes.
I'm about to buy a ktm 250 sx. And I want to ride her on the track.
Anyone out this way have any suggestions?

if you have the ability to ride during the week find Riverdale raceway on facebook and call them up a day before you want to ride. they normally allow you to go up during the week and there is normally only a few guys there plus they have 3 tracks to choose from.

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7/31/2017 12:04 PM

Pats Acres in Canby is very laid back and beginner friendly. Wasn't very busy, not the greatest track, but it will get you used to being on a track .

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7/31/2017 12:55 PM

Zaugg wrote:

Mountain View...a track near you and a pretty awesome one at that, used to split their practices up into groups based on skill level. I'm guessing they still do. I'd go there.

All the advice above is excellent.

Don't be afraid to ask people questions at the track. That includes staff and other riders.

Have fun...

Last time I went to Mt View I rode in the beginner group. I got run off the track a couple of times by Pros. I had one Pro fly over me at one point. In my experience, people just go on the track whenever they want because no one is stopping them. I've had better luck at Washougal and Woodland MX. PIR is good for practice sessions after the season is done and before the rain starts.

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7/31/2017 1:59 PM

Nobody on the track cares that you are slow or how slow you go. Just "be predictable". Stay to one side and hold that line, don't stop anywhere on the track, don't zig-zag across it, the fast guys will go around you and if you just hold your line it makes it easier for them.

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7/31/2017 11:26 PM

Swann wrote:

Just remember this ever-so-important rule while riding on a track with mixed skillsets - HOLD YOUR LINE

Do not weave in-and-out of your line. Faster people behind you will find a way around you. Don't worry about what is behind you. Only worry about holding your line and getting comfortable on the track. More experienced riders are experienced enough to know how to safely pass you. If you start criss-crossing along the track, they have no way to predict this and that is when really bad things happen. This is especially true over jumps. You can often see where the fast line is leading up to a jump, so if you're still getting comfortable, just avoid the fast line and stay in yours.

If you happen to fall over on a blind spot on the track, hi-tail it off the track. Don't worry about your bike. You can usually count on your moto brethren to lend a hand if there aren't flaggers, unless they're tweaker assholes or maniacal no-shirt wearing Native Americans who are only out to kill you with their clapped out 450.

Have fun. You'll love it.

What does being Native American have anything to do with anything?

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