List of helmets with improved concussion preventing technology.

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7/26/2019 8:19 AM

Help me make a quick list of what's currently on the market for recently designed concussion mitigating helmets.


6D ATR-2 (rubber cup cushions)
Bell Flex (Similar to MIPS?)
Fly Formula (Proprietary)
TLD SE-4 (MIPS)


What else is out there that I've missed?

Do these brands offer anything aimed at preventing concussions?
Airoh
Arai
Shoei

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7/26/2019 8:21 AM

Shoei is MEDS (similar to MIPS)

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7/26/2019 8:25 AM

kwebster447 wrote:

Shoei is MEDS (similar to MIPS)

That's in the VFX-EVO?

I have a couple VFX-W now... Crashed in one, knocked myself out last night.
I like the build quality of the Shoei, but I think it's time to get into something with modern tech.

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7/26/2019 8:29 AM

Yes only in the Evo. I personally chose to buy a 6D.

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7/26/2019 8:32 AM

kwebster447 wrote:

Yes only in the Evo. I personally chose to buy a 6D.

That's one near the top of my list. I think the inspect/rebuild service is appealing. I keep these things around three or four years if I don't hit my head.

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7/26/2019 8:39 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/26/2019 8:42 AM

UFO Helmets

Designed and manufactured in Italy.

RIAS - Rotation Impact Absorbing System is the revolutionary Diamond helmet technology: In addition to dissipating compression-absorbing shocks like traditional helmets (linear impact), the helmet structure combines innovative technology that dissipates the energy associated with rotational acceleration (rotational impact), reducing tension and providing additional protection for some types of impact.

This is all possible thanks to the combined work of the different layers of material used: The main inner shell in high density EPS is characterised by a very compact, rigid outer surface (in contact with the outer shell). The inner surface has large grooves that offer a dual function: they provide greater airflow and differentiate impact force dissipation, effectively as if the main layer had two different densities. Inner oscillating shell, consisting of low density polypropylene foam (PPE) to provide gradual absorption, was designed to rotate inside the helmet, working in conjunction with the Main inner shell.

This system enables multi-directional sliding that also dissipates the energy associated with rotational acceleration, so as to improve protection in case of rotational impact.

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"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

7/26/2019 8:42 AM

I liked the extensive testing of 6D and that it is in its second generation. Hit up Kris at keeferinctesting.com he is very knowledgeable on it and may even be able to save you a little money on one.

Fox also has the new V3 with fluid inside tech.

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7/26/2019 8:52 AM

Just FYI, I asked the Arai rep about their intentions to design a "next gen" helmet with some kind of rotational impact protection like MIPS or the 6D design, and he stated they have absolutely no intention of doing so. Why? Here's what he said, paraphrased:
Arai has always performed better in rotational impact tests that other helmets because of the shape. Notice that an Arai is round, instead of having pointy shapes all over it. For that reason alone, the wearer's head will be less likely to be subjected to rotational impacts in the first place, and the need to reduce them is mitigated. Arai is also concerned that the physical structure of the elastomers inside a "next-gen" liner create hard points which reduce the impact absorption of the shell.

Food for thought.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

7/26/2019 9:09 AM

Airoh Aviator 2.3 AMS2.

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7/26/2019 9:57 AM

Shoei has their new MEDS System in the VFX-Evo

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Fly has a new helmet with a new way to address rotational impact called Rheon

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The new Fox V3 is also getting new tech this year, a gel pack type of deal designed to mimic the fluid around your brain called Fluid Inside

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LS2's Subverter has its own version of MIPS


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Washed up Canadian ex-pro couch racer. Selling bikes for a living

2008 KTM 525XC
2009 KTM 450SX
2016 YFZ450R


7/26/2019 10:07 AM

Man, the Shoei haters are a force on Vital.
I went the other way. Sold my 6D and bought a Shoei EVO. The 6D (like Arai) just did not fit my dome. The Bell feels like a Walmart product---cheap. And, I'm not trusting my gray matter to a company that also sells gear. Heart surgeon for hearts, helmet manufacturers for helmets...


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“Men, we are surrounded by the enemy. We have the greatest opportunity ever presented an army. We can attack in any direction.”
― General Anthony McAuliffe, 101st Airborne, while addressing troops at Bastogne during the Battle
of the Bulge.

7/26/2019 10:08 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/26/2019 10:11 AM

Pretty sure the Answer AR5 has mips


Edit: It does

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7/26/2019 10:10 AM

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7/26/2019 10:11 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/26/2019 10:17 AM

Do your own research and look into the labs who tested the helmets and designed the technology. There is a lot of marketing out there designed as science.

The best example, or worst, is Fly's most recent helmet. They claimed in the press release and on podcasts that the product was independently tested.

That is not the case as by definition their testing is not independent: RHEON Labs was one of the "independent" labs which tested the effectiveness of the helmet, yet RHEON was also the lab that designed the gel-like substance that goes in the helmet to supposedly mitigate concussive-blow severity.

Having a lab which has a financial stake in the helmet, and which designed components of the helmet, complete the "independent" testing, is laughable and meets the definition of conflict of interest.


I have nothing against Fly. I recently bought 2 jerseys for mountain biking which have worked out well for me. However, when a company tries to take advantage of or mislead their customers (don't mention the info-graphic they published with incorrect data), I will always speak up and point out the falsehoods.


Never take advertising at face values and do your own research.

Don't take my word for it: see their website: https://rheonlabs.com/rheon-x-fly-racing-launch-formula/

The inventor of RHEON Dr. Plant is quoted as saying "I am a motocross rider as well as being a testing and impact specialist, and I choose to wear the FLY FORMULA helmet with RHEON technology, simply because it’s safer"

Independent labs don't market or endorse the products they "test".

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7/26/2019 10:31 AM

Casting wrote:

Do your own research and look into the labs who tested the helmets and designed the technology. There is a lot of marketing out there designed as science.

The best example, or worst, is Fly's most recent helmet. They claimed in the press release and on podcasts that the product was independently tested.

That is not the case as by definition their testing is not independent: RHEON Labs was one of the "independent" labs which tested the effectiveness of the helmet, yet RHEON was also the lab that designed the gel-like substance that goes in the helmet to supposedly mitigate concussive-blow severity.

Having a lab which has a financial stake in the helmet, and which designed components of the helmet, complete the "independent" testing, is laughable and meets the definition of conflict of interest.


I have nothing against Fly. I recently bought 2 jerseys for mountain biking which have worked out well for me. However, when a company tries to take advantage of or mislead their customers (don't mention the info-graphic they published with incorrect data), I will always speak up and point out the falsehoods.


Never take advertising at face values and do your own research.

Don't take my word for it: see their website: https://rheonlabs.com/rheon-x-fly-racing-launch-formula/

The inventor of RHEON Dr. Plant is quoted as saying "I am a motocross rider as well as being a testing and impact specialist, and I choose to wear the FLY FORMULA helmet with RHEON technology, simply because it’s safer"

Independent labs don't market or endorse the products they "test".

Regarding your first sentence. Yes, 100%. That's why I started this thread. I follow some of these developments, but plan to do a deeper dive into this stuff now to choose my next lid.

You're right about independent testing too. Even if the lab was a 3rd party, if Fly pays for the testing, it's not independent testing. In this case it's neither 3rd party nor independent.

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7/26/2019 10:35 AM

Red Crawford wrote:

Man, the Shoei haters are a force on Vital.
I went the other way. Sold my 6D and bought a Shoei EVO. The 6D (like Arai) just did not fit my dome. The Bell feels like a Walmart product---cheap. And, I'm not trusting my gray matter to a company that also sells gear. Heart surgeon for hearts, helmet manufacturers for helmets...


The build quality of a Shoei or Aria helmet is nice. I can't say the Chinese and Tiawanese sourced helmets measure up in that aspect. Even the first version 6D helmets I looked at a few years back had visible build-quality flaws.

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7/26/2019 10:43 AM

Red Crawford wrote:

Man, the Shoei haters are a force on Vital.
I went the other way. Sold my 6D and bought a Shoei EVO. The 6D (like Arai) just did not fit my dome. The Bell feels like a Walmart product---cheap. And, I'm not trusting my gray matter to a company that also sells gear. Heart surgeon for hearts, helmet manufacturers for helmets...


Funny... my bell moto 9 flex has the same quality my shoei rf1200 does. Dont know why youd say that.

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7/26/2019 11:09 AM

Falcon wrote:

Just FYI, I asked the Arai rep about their intentions to design a "next gen" helmet with some kind of rotational impact protection like MIPS or the 6D design, and he stated they have absolutely no intention of doing so. Why? Here's what he said, paraphrased:
Arai has always performed better in rotational impact tests that other helmets because of the shape. Notice that an Arai is round, instead of having pointy shapes all over it. For that reason alone, the wearer's head will be less likely to be subjected to rotational impacts in the first place, and the need to reduce them is mitigated. Arai is also concerned that the physical structure of the elastomers inside a "next-gen" liner create hard points which reduce the impact absorption of the shell.

Food for thought.

That's the whole reason I went with the Arai over the Shoei. I didn't want a helmet with those rubber shock absorber things, I'm not entirely convinced they're that effective. Arai just makes a damn good helmet, and they've done so for a long time. I like that they let the Chinese made brands waste their time and money chasing these "innovations" that everyone on Vital upholds as some crazy step forward in helmet technology when it could very well be a gimmick depending on how it's deployed by the manufacturer. They stick to their round shell mentality, and my friends and I will continue to keep buying their helmets.

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@fiendz.cc

7/26/2019 11:22 AM

It's great to see all the manufactures doing their best to mitigate force to the brain. The consumer, however, does not have objective information about which one does this best, which is pretty sad, as that is the function of a helmet. The AMA or other body should fund a lab to test them. I trust the Shoei, but that's a completely intuitive and gut thing. The Bell system seems a bit clunky. The Fox one could work well, but hard to tell. Arai rep has a point, but allowing the skull to move inside the helmet is always going to reduce force.

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7/26/2019 11:22 AM

I hit my head hard in my Arai in a turn at Milestone and it definitely did it's job. I think the round shell helps during a crash to kind of move with the flow instead of hanging up somewhere. Decided to replace it with the 6D ATR 2 and thankfully haven't tested the impact absorption yet, lol. I definitely miss the feel, quality, fit, finish and look of the Arai but I'm loving this ATR-2 so far. As far as the system being effective time will tell, and also the point of safety gear is to be preventative. There is no way to 100% guarantee what could and couldn't help in a crash. But you have to give it up to Bob Weber for at least trying something new......

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2017 CRF450r

7/26/2019 11:23 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/26/2019 11:24 AM

Red Crawford wrote:

Man, the Shoei haters are a force on Vital.
I went the other way. Sold my 6D and bought a Shoei EVO. The 6D (like Arai) just did not fit my dome. The Bell feels like a Walmart product---cheap. And, I'm not trusting my gray matter to a company that also sells gear. Heart surgeon for hearts, helmet manufacturers for helmets...


kb228 wrote:

Funny... my bell moto 9 flex has the same quality my shoei rf1200 does. Dont know why youd say that.

Just my opinion and, to be fair there is no right answer. To me, the trim work, liner, and outer shell on the Flex9 feels/looks cheaper than the Shoei.

I read through the other thread bashing Shoei because of the liners. My wife has no issues re-installing the liner in my EVO, so if she is happy---I'm happy. 😁

I thought my 6D (ATR1) was very well constructed, but it just did not feel right on my dome.


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“Men, we are surrounded by the enemy. We have the greatest opportunity ever presented an army. We can attack in any direction.”
― General Anthony McAuliffe, 101st Airborne, while addressing troops at Bastogne during the Battle
of the Bulge.

7/26/2019 11:38 AM

Falcon wrote:

Just FYI, I asked the Arai rep about their intentions to design a "next gen" helmet with some kind of rotational impact protection like MIPS or the 6D design, and he stated they have absolutely no intention of doing so. Why? Here's what he said, paraphrased:
Arai has always performed better in rotational impact tests that other helmets because of the shape. Notice that an Arai is round, instead of having pointy shapes all over it. For that reason alone, the wearer's head will be less likely to be subjected to rotational impacts in the first place, and the need to reduce them is mitigated. Arai is also concerned that the physical structure of the elastomers inside a "next-gen" liner create hard points which reduce the impact absorption of the shell.

Food for thought.

I mean, they have to say something, right? The round helmet philosophy is fine, but I don't believe for a second they wouldn't benefit from modern technology. The other brands are innovating. If Arai doesn't believe in those innovations, why don't they try to come up with something better?

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7/26/2019 11:41 AM

sandtrack315 wrote:

It's great to see all the manufactures doing their best to mitigate force to the brain. The consumer, however, does not have objective information about which one does this best, which is pretty sad, as that is the function of a helmet. The AMA or other body should fund a lab to test them. I trust the Shoei, but that's a completely intuitive and gut thing. The Bell system seems a bit clunky. The Fox one could work well, but hard to tell. Arai rep has a point, but allowing the skull to move inside the helmet is always going to reduce force.

If the AMA were consistently doing stuff like that, I'd be a lifetime member.

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7/26/2019 11:59 AM

LS2 Subverter uses a layer of plastic to allow slippage, much like MIPS.

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7/26/2019 12:10 PM

Popcorn popped waiting for the 10 pager. w00t

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7/26/2019 12:15 PM

Start a Pateron/go-fund me etc to fund it, buy all the top contenders and find a lab to do the test publish the data. Problem solved....RMATV cart puts it at $4100 for Fox, Fly, Leatt, Bell, Arai, Shoei and 6D.

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7/26/2019 12:24 PM

yeroc281 wrote:

Popcorn popped waiting for the 10 pager. w00t

You guys always want controversy. I didn't ask which one is best and don't really make my decisions based on the advise of some people on the internet. All I'm taking out of this thread is a list of helmets and technologies, from there I'll do my own research. The best helmet for me may not be the best one the Forum Committee Vitale selects.

Add something useful, or go find a premix ratio thread.

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7/26/2019 12:30 PM

Falcon wrote:

Just FYI, I asked the Arai rep about their intentions to design a "next gen" helmet with some kind of rotational impact protection like MIPS or the 6D design, and he stated they have absolutely no intention of doing so. Why? Here's what he said, paraphrased:
Arai has always performed better in rotational impact tests that other helmets because of the shape. Notice that an Arai is round, instead of having pointy shapes all over it. For that reason alone, the wearer's head will be less likely to be subjected to rotational impacts in the first place, and the need to reduce them is mitigated. Arai is also concerned that the physical structure of the elastomers inside a "next-gen" liner create hard points which reduce the impact absorption of the shell.

Food for thought.

GrapeApe wrote:

I mean, they have to say something, right? The round helmet philosophy is fine, but I don't believe for a second they wouldn't benefit from modern technology. The other brands are innovating. If Arai doesn't believe in those innovations, why don't they try to come up with something better?

There's some truth to that round helmet thing for sure, but if I'm hearing you correctly, why wouldn't Arai want to include additional protection to their already safe shell shape. I think that's a logical and fair question to ask.



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7/26/2019 12:31 PM

Guess what very expensive helmet mentioned in this thread I’ve been knocked out in three times and those helmets were then sent back to that manufacturer for testing with all coming back with a clean bill of health because there was zero EPS compression.

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7/26/2019 12:31 PM

The more cushion there is, the more force will be mitigated before getting to your brain.

Maybe the Arai does this well enough to not need gel? Maybe not? All I know is that I don't want a bike with LESS suspension travel. All this helmet technology is just suspension for your brain. They keep adding stuff to help slow down the energy before it "bottoms out" on your skull.

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