Going pro

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8/5/2017 9:20 AM

Is 16 too old to try to go pro in moto?

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8/5/2017 9:24 AM

Yes. You should have turned pro no later then the age of 12. Seems as though you did a ton of research on this.

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

8/5/2017 9:24 AM

If you got unlimited funds and can ride/train intensely for the next two years you maybe have a shot at it but if you are just starting out in the sport well the ship has sailed away.

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"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

8/5/2017 9:29 AM

These days probly unless you are extremely talented...

But if you need some inspiration read up a bit on Joël Smets his carreer. He didn't start riding untill age 17..

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8/5/2017 9:41 AM

I know it was a different time in the sport but dowd, McGrath all started late, oh ya Ronnie mac started super late too so there is hope

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8/5/2017 10:38 AM

You got this bro, sell the ttr for a Yz125, ride every day, don't worry about maintenance it's not that big of a deal, then go race the 125 dream race. Boom you made it

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8/5/2017 11:05 AM

You won't know unless you try. Better to try and fail then to not try at all.

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8/5/2017 11:07 AM

If ya gotta ask, that's your answer.

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8/5/2017 11:59 AM

Too old to get a pro license and qualify top 40 for a pro national or SX race? No not too old at all if you can get strong financial backing and can dedicate a large portion of your day to day life to training and riding for the next 5-10 years and can stay healthy.

Too old to make it big and get a factory ride? Yes most likely.

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8/5/2017 12:29 PM

When people say "TOO OLD" this is the first guy i think of..........and he is an absolute LEGEND

Photo

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twist wrist and go...

brad@palmspringsmotorsports.com

8/5/2017 12:54 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/5/2017 1:03 PM

I disagree with all of the naysayers.

If this is your dream and you dedicate to it 1000%, it's possible. I repeat, you have to go 1000% or they're right.
Why do I say this?
Because in almost everything in life a great deal of the time spent "practicing" and gaining experience is doing the same thing over and over, and over, and over. That's absolutely necessary to perfect any skill, but that part of it is not required for 15 years.

The time that matters most is the time spent learning new skills, and MASTERING others. That goes for anything you want to succeed in. Be "Present" every time. That is where the magic is in anything.

The time spent going through the motions is necessary to a point and for a time. After that it gets in the way, because we get into a habit of going through the motions. When I play guitar, I put it down when I'm not ("Present"). It's mostly a waste of time.

In order to accelerate your progress you'll have to work hard, and very smart.
That means:
* First and foremost, be "Present" every single moment that you're on the bike. Every moment! Without this, you're wasting your time. You can't make up for 15 years of practice in 3 or 4 years unless you do it differently. While you're practicing, ride how you'll race (but don't be an a$$hole to others on the track). Always be looking for ways to go faster, every lap, all of the time.
* Observe what your competitors do both good and bad, and make adjustments to your own techniques accordingly, immediately.
* Race every race near you. Enter 2 classes.
* Race to win from the first gate drop. Fight for the win and for every position, every time, even when you're last off the start and it seems impossible. Race until you cross the line, whether you're in first of last. This is part of developing the heart of a champion.
* Study the films of as many races as possible, especially the helmet cam footage. Study them, not just watch them.
There's a tremendous amount to learn. When I'm lifting weights, I watch RV and others' helmet cam footage at Unadilla, Spring Creek, etc... and understand why he chooses the lines he chooses. I'm trying to get inside his head to understand why he does what he does and make it my own. For example, I can tell you RV's technique for ruts. He avoids them as much as possible. I'm getting a portion of his experience when I'm not even on the bike. Believe me, it helps a lot.

* Listen and consider the advice you hear, read or watch, then choose what you buy into and what you don't. The experts disagree on things, so they can't all be right. Consider everything. Be willing to buck trends if you believe you have a better way. Also, be willing to admit wholeheartedly when you're wrong and make adjustments. The goal is to become faster, not to be right.
* Learn at a faster pace than everyone else. Observe, practice that one thing until it's how you want it, then don't accept that as the end all. Continue to look for ways to improve it. The moment you start going through the motions is the day your progress slows to a crawl.

* Get your ass in shape, big time. It'll take time for you to become pro and more time to be competitive nationally, but really only a year or two be in as good of shape as anyone on the circuit.

Make it a goal that when you meet the pros at a SX or MX race, to be in as good or better shape then any of them. You need the fitness.

Besides if you're too old at 16, then I'm definitely too old, and I haven't given up the dream smile. Actually, at 55 I've moved on to other goals and dreams. I have the fitness believe it or not, I have the determination. I don't have the ability to pause everything and put 1000% into it, but even at 55 it's improbable, but not impossible. If you don't believe me, look up John Dowd.

So, the big question is:
"Are you willing to put EVERYTHING YOU HAVE WITHIN YOU, 1000% into racing MX for the next 5 years?"

If the answer is yes, then do it, and don't look back.
If the answer is no, then still get the 125, then go out and simply have some fun.

Radical





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8/5/2017 1:15 PM

-MAVERICK- wrote:

If you got unlimited funds and can ride/train intensely for the next two years you maybe have a shot at it but if you are just starting out in the sport well the ship has sailed away.

Joel smets started to ride dirt bikes when he was 17 years old.
And he surely didn't have unlimited funds
But yeah for 99.9% of humans the ship has sailed

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8/5/2017 1:20 PM

If you can't quad......don't turn pro!

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8/5/2017 3:13 PM

aversage2 wrote:

Is 16 too old to try to go pro in moto?

What are your moto accomplishments so far? What class do you race? Far as I see it. "Going pro " has two levels. Many have gotten their pro card, attempted to qualify yet never actually raced in a pro race. then there is pro, actually qualifying for nationals. This level of speed requires years of dedicated time, money and fitness. Some people just don't have it, like myself.

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2010 crf450
2002 cr125
1993 Yamaha waveblaster
1993 Kawasaki 750sx

8/5/2017 4:31 PM

Radical wrote:

I disagree with all of the naysayers.

If this is your dream and you dedicate to it 1000%, it's possible. I repeat, you have to go 1000% or they're right.
Why do I say this?
Because in almost everything in life a great deal of the time spent "practicing" and gaining experience is doing the same thing over and over, and over, and over. That's absolutely necessary to perfect any skill, but that part of it is not required for 15 years.

The time that matters most is the time spent learning new skills, and MASTERING others. That goes for anything you want to succeed in. Be "Present" every time. That is where the magic is in anything.

The time spent going through the motions is necessary to a point and for a time. After that it gets in the way, because we get into a habit of going through the motions. When I play guitar, I put it down when I'm not ("Present"). It's mostly a waste of time.

In order to accelerate your progress you'll have to work hard, and very smart.
That means:
* First and foremost, be "Present" every single moment that you're on the bike. Every moment! Without this, you're wasting your time. You can't make up for 15 years of practice in 3 or 4 years unless you do it differently. While you're practicing, ride how you'll race (but don't be an a$$hole to others on the track). Always be looking for ways to go faster, every lap, all of the time.
* Observe what your competitors do both good and bad, and make adjustments to your own techniques accordingly, immediately.
* Race every race near you. Enter 2 classes.
* Race to win from the first gate drop. Fight for the win and for every position, every time, even when you're last off the start and it seems impossible. Race until you cross the line, whether you're in first of last. This is part of developing the heart of a champion.
* Study the films of as many races as possible, especially the helmet cam footage. Study them, not just watch them.
There's a tremendous amount to learn. When I'm lifting weights, I watch RV and others' helmet cam footage at Unadilla, Spring Creek, etc... and understand why he chooses the lines he chooses. I'm trying to get inside his head to understand why he does what he does and make it my own. For example, I can tell you RV's technique for ruts. He avoids them as much as possible. I'm getting a portion of his experience when I'm not even on the bike. Believe me, it helps a lot.

* Listen and consider the advice you hear, read or watch, then choose what you buy into and what you don't. The experts disagree on things, so they can't all be right. Consider everything. Be willing to buck trends if you believe you have a better way. Also, be willing to admit wholeheartedly when you're wrong and make adjustments. The goal is to become faster, not to be right.
* Learn at a faster pace than everyone else. Observe, practice that one thing until it's how you want it, then don't accept that as the end all. Continue to look for ways to improve it. The moment you start going through the motions is the day your progress slows to a crawl.

* Get your ass in shape, big time. It'll take time for you to become pro and more time to be competitive nationally, but really only a year or two be in as good of shape as anyone on the circuit.

Make it a goal that when you meet the pros at a SX or MX race, to be in as good or better shape then any of them. You need the fitness.

Besides if you're too old at 16, then I'm definitely too old, and I haven't given up the dream smile. Actually, at 55 I've moved on to other goals and dreams. I have the fitness believe it or not, I have the determination. I don't have the ability to pause everything and put 1000% into it, but even at 55 it's improbable, but not impossible. If you don't believe me, look up John Dowd.

So, the big question is:
"Are you willing to put EVERYTHING YOU HAVE WITHIN YOU, 1000% into racing MX for the next 5 years?"

If the answer is yes, then do it, and don't look back.
If the answer is no, then still get the 125, then go out and simply have some fun.

Radical





Very considered and thought out post. Your approach reminds me of Gary Semics... good stuff.

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8/5/2017 4:41 PM

Going pro and making a living at it? Quite possible but the amount of commitment, dedication and sacrifice needed will be off the charts... Going Pro but doing it as a hobby, doable...

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8/5/2017 4:42 PM

How rich are your parents?

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Instagram: vanillaice782
Amateur helmet painter

8/5/2017 4:51 PM

Well if you think your ready to turn pro now at 16, you must already be pretty fast. No the ship has not sailed! But you better get after it.

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8/5/2017 5:12 PM

It's doable IF you can get your hands on a factory ECU.

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8/5/2017 5:14 PM

F.B wrote:

It's doable IF you can get your hands on a factory ECU.

That's going to be tough! Stews having a hard enough time finding one laughing

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8/5/2017 6:26 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/5/2017 6:27 PM

F.B wrote:

It's doable IF you can get your hands on a factory ECU.

cali11 wrote:

That's going to be tough! Stews having a hard enough time finding one laughing

The OP will have to find a way to get one. If he doesn't he can forget about his dream and should consider the golf/Dunkin' Donuts lifestyle.

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