Engineering Jobs in the Industry

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1/8/2019 11:10 AM

Hey guys. I was reluctant to start a new thread for this because I know how angry it makes some of you, but I have a question for those who are more connected to the industry than me and the last related post I found was circa 2011.

So, I've been racing and riding moto/offroad since the age of 3. I took it pretty seriously as a kid and racked in a few state championships, regional stuff, LL, local pro, etc. My dad always made it clear to me that we were in no position to chase a professional dream and insisted that I focused on school, and I did. This May I will be graduating with a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma. It has always been my dream to race bikes professionally, my views have since been shifted from that of a racer to a team member. At my current job, I work as the sole engineer for a local company (BlastPro Manufacturing) designing parts for industrial floor scrapers and shot blasting equipment as well as designing my first production vehicle. My experience here is definitely relevant to a certain extent, but with a focus more on reliability rather than performance (by this I mean our stuff is made from 1" steel plate and has safety factors well over 10). I have my base experience from rebuilding bikes in the garage with my dad as a kid. I have since built on this learning how to wire and program electric vehicles, prototyping parts to ready for production, and then optimizing current designs with a focus on improving production time for all vehicles. I enjoy my job and the role I play in this company, but it just isn't my true calling.

So here's what it all boils down to. As I said, I'm graduating in May. I have no interest in staying in Oklahoma (in fact, I want to get as far away from here as humanly possible). My dream is to work for an OEM as a development engineer where I can have a role in both the designing as well as the performance testing of bikes and parts. I've searched job boards applied to all the open engineering jobs at Honda, Kawi, etc. I routinely check motorcycleindustryjobs.com but am reluctant to find anything in my department (or with less than 5 years experience). I'm on the verge of applying as a tech for a race team and trying my luck there, but I want to get input from people more in tune with the industry than I have at my disposal here in BFE Oklahoma.

I open the floor to you. If you were me, what sort of routes do you feel could land me in a position where I can make a difference in this industry? Have you heard of any companies that are seeking young, motivated, and enthusiastic engineers? Should I pack my bags and pitch a tent outside the OEMs in SoCal? Any input is appreciated, guys. Thanks!

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1/8/2019 11:20 AM

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

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1/8/2019 11:27 AM

barnett468 wrote:

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

What he said. I've been a ME for 30 years.Worked at Boyesen when I was taking courses at PSU. You may get hooked up with a small accessory manufacturer but you won't make any $$$. You didn't bust your hump for 4 years in college taking engineering to make chump change. Do yourself a favor and look elsewhere. Sorry, don't mean to be a debbie-downer.

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1/8/2019 11:29 AM

Ive been a tool and die design engineer for 6 years now. Best thing i can tell you is to get some experience. We have had BSME guys come in from ohio state or other colleges and they literally do not know how to design. Engineering isnt “get the degree and you know it.” Experienced guys will always outdo the guys with an expensive piece of paper. Ive been doing this for 6 years, and the degree guys come in and i train them. Yet i feel like i know nothing compared to our Sr designers with 15+ years in. Its really crazy.

That being said, those OEM companies like honda kawi ford chevy etc.. want extremely good designers. Theres guys like myself who do good as a tooling designer in a small town that designs based off what has worked in the past and that kind of stuff wont work for kawasaki. Then theres geniuses out there who design rediculously efficient engines or elaborate manufacturing machinery or soundproofing foam for car parts using tons of math and simulations. Thats who theyll try to pick up.

I dont know what to tell you to land a job in developing the latest high performance cylinder head. But i can tell you relevant experience is key. Maybe look for an internship in a place that develops engines or chassis for lawn mowers. I dont know.

Im sure other guys have some differing opinions, but this is just based on what ive seen.

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1/8/2019 11:30 AM

barnett468 wrote:

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

I get that. That's why I decided to go with engineering in the first place. My fallback is to stay where I'm at as they have already offered me a full-time position with appropriate compensation after I graduate. I just feel like I would be squandering my potential if I didn't make an attempt. With my bike skills and knowledge of how everything is made and how it impacts performance, I feel like I would be letting myself and the industry down if I just didn't try. Thank you for the response, though.

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1/8/2019 11:33 AM

Don't give up on your dream. Keep showing face at local races, make friends and maintain relationships. Keep at it and a door will open, build from up from there.

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Non Gratum Anus Rodentum

1/8/2019 11:35 AM

barnett468 wrote:

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

ama530 wrote:

What he said. I've been a ME for 30 years.Worked at Boyesen when I was taking courses at PSU. You may get hooked up with a small accessory manufacturer but you won't make any $$$. You didn't bust your hump for 4 years in college taking engineering to make chump change. Do yourself a favor and look elsewhere. Sorry, don't mean to be a debbie-downer.

That is insightful. I kind of assumed that engineers made good money no matter where they worked, but I don't have any proof that such is the case within our industry. I appreciate the input. Worst case scenario I stay outside the industry and line my pockets with plenty to spare for my hobby, I guess.

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1/8/2019 11:38 AM

barnett468 wrote:

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

ama530 wrote:

What he said. I've been a ME for 30 years.Worked at Boyesen when I was taking courses at PSU. You may get hooked up with a small accessory manufacturer but you won't make any $$$. You didn't bust your hump for 4 years in college taking engineering to make chump change. Do yourself a favor and look elsewhere. Sorry, don't mean to be a debbie-downer.

scrallex wrote:

That is insightful. I kind of assumed that engineers made good money no matter where they worked, but I don't have any proof that such is the case within our industry. I appreciate the input. Worst case scenario I stay outside the industry and line my pockets with plenty to spare for my hobby, I guess.

Unless you land a good job, youll be making between 30-45k until youre over the 5 year experience mark. 70-80k is where it tops out. The salary things online and what colleges give is misleading. Youll get there eventually, just not right off the bat.

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1/8/2019 11:41 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/8/2019 11:43 AM

barnett468 wrote:

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

scrallex wrote:

I get that. That's why I decided to go with engineering in the first place. My fallback is to stay where I'm at as they have already offered me a full-time position with appropriate compensation after I graduate. I just feel like I would be squandering my potential if I didn't make an attempt. With my bike skills and knowledge of how everything is made and how it impacts performance, I feel like I would be letting myself and the industry down if I just didn't try. Thank you for the response, though.

I don't think anyone wants to discourage you from "trying" but you asked the question and so you are getting the answers.

I was a project engineer in the US based R & D department for Kawasaki Motors Japan in the 80's, which was based in the Kawasaki Motors building in so cal, so I know exactly what it took to get a job like that back then, and I seriously doubt that it has changed much. These types of jobs are as rare as hens teeth, and there are way more qualified people then jobs available, and everyone knows most everyone else in the industry, and in my experience, they prefer to hire people that are already in it if possible. In other words, it's almost, but not quite, a closed door, and you better have a killer resume to open that door if you are on the outside of it.

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1/8/2019 11:52 AM

I worked for Yamaha Motor Corp right out of college in the R&D department. I traveled a lot testing all over the North America (upwards of 150 days a year on the road). It was great and I learned a lot. As I got older the traveling was too much so I left.

Anyways, my point is, its not at all difficult to find a job with an OEM. Check out this page- he does a lot of recruiting in the power sports business. Also check out the career pages from each OEM. Lots of jobs.

https://henrylonski.com/

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1/8/2019 11:53 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/8/2019 11:54 AM

I'm an electrical engineer at a consulting firm and the two places I interviewed at offered between 50-60k starting depending on if you have passed the FE exam, doesn't get much better until you pass the PE exam at the 4 year mark. My company pays the electrical and mechanical the same pretty much. I recently looked around in Houston thinking the pay would be around 80k but it was still in the 60s over there.

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1/8/2019 11:58 AM

From someone with the same education and had the same desires as a young man, you will be financially better served by getting into gas and oil. Particularly where you're located in the country. I can afford to participate in as much moto as I want and I have professional experience to work anywhere in the country. Just some 2 cents from an old man.

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1/8/2019 12:05 PM

kb228 wrote:

Ive been a tool and die design engineer for 6 years now. Best thing i can tell you is to get some experience. We have had BSME guys come in from ohio state or other colleges and they literally do not know how to design. Engineering isnt “get the degree and you know it.” Experienced guys will always outdo the guys with an expensive piece of paper. Ive been doing this for 6 years, and the degree guys come in and i train them. Yet i feel like i know nothing compared to our Sr designers with 15+ years in. Its really crazy.

That being said, those OEM companies like honda kawi ford chevy etc.. want extremely good designers. Theres guys like myself who do good as a tooling designer in a small town that designs based off what has worked in the past and that kind of stuff wont work for kawasaki. Then theres geniuses out there who design rediculously efficient engines or elaborate manufacturing machinery or soundproofing foam for car parts using tons of math and simulations. Thats who theyll try to pick up.

I dont know what to tell you to land a job in developing the latest high performance cylinder head. But i can tell you relevant experience is key. Maybe look for an internship in a place that develops engines or chassis for lawn mowers. I dont know.

Im sure other guys have some differing opinions, but this is just based on what ive seen.

Trust me when I say that I understand what you mean. I showed up at my current job with the mentality that I don't know anything and that I need to keep my trap shut until my input is asked. And, if I'm being honest, it's worked out well for me. The machine that I get to call my own is made with roughly 40% of the components and has manufacturing near 50% of its brother models. I took my time learning the positions around the fab shop, the types of breaks that are preferred by our operators, and the access points that technicians have to mount components. There's no doubt in my mind that I could be as good if not better than any engineer in this industry in due time with the right people to guide me.

I know how to do the math. I know how to do the simulations. I'm no expert at either but I also feel that I'm not done learning. I will definitely consider your input of looking for employment in similar sectors such as mowers. Thank you!

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1/8/2019 12:10 PM

Brad460 wrote:

I worked for Yamaha Motor Corp right out of college in the R&D department. I traveled a lot testing all over the North America (upwards of 150 days a year on the road). It was great and I learned a lot. As I got older the traveling was too much so I left.

Anyways, my point is, its not at all difficult to find a job with an OEM. Check out this page- he does a lot of recruiting in the power sports business. Also check out the career pages from each OEM. Lots of jobs.

https://henrylonski.com/

THIS! This is exactly what I was looking for! I'm not looking for a hand out here, more so some guidance from people who have a background similar to mine and with knowledge of how it worked for them. Thank you!!

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1/8/2019 12:15 PM

barnett468 wrote:

The reality is that you will likely never get a job at a motorcycle mfg, so I suggest you put your efforts into looking elsewhere that you have a better chance at getting a job at.

ama530 wrote:

What he said. I've been a ME for 30 years.Worked at Boyesen when I was taking courses at PSU. You may get hooked up with a small accessory manufacturer but you won't make any $$$. You didn't bust your hump for 4 years in college taking engineering to make chump change. Do yourself a favor and look elsewhere. Sorry, don't mean to be a debbie-downer.

scrallex wrote:

That is insightful. I kind of assumed that engineers made good money no matter where they worked, but I don't have any proof that such is the case within our industry. I appreciate the input. Worst case scenario I stay outside the industry and line my pockets with plenty to spare for my hobby, I guess.

I did an internship at Rekluse as a RND Engineer designing and testing clutches and absolutely loved the job and the people that I worked with but when it came down to it, the motorcycle industry just doesn't have the funds to pay us what we could be making. After graduation, the two job offers I received outside of motocross were 8k and 12k higher (starting) than what my friends at rekluse were making after a couple years. Similar to you I wanted to be an OEM design engineer but decided to work somewhere that would pay for my expensive hobby (and a family) instead of working with my hobby. I definitely am agreeing with ama530 on this on, not trying to be a downer but we did work hard for 4 years to make decent money.

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1/8/2019 12:16 PM

ama530 wrote:

What he said. I've been a ME for 30 years.Worked at Boyesen when I was taking courses at PSU. You may get hooked up with a small accessory manufacturer but you won't make any $$$. You didn't bust your hump for 4 years in college taking engineering to make chump change. Do yourself a favor and look elsewhere. Sorry, don't mean to be a debbie-downer.

scrallex wrote:

That is insightful. I kind of assumed that engineers made good money no matter where they worked, but I don't have any proof that such is the case within our industry. I appreciate the input. Worst case scenario I stay outside the industry and line my pockets with plenty to spare for my hobby, I guess.

kb228 wrote:

Unless you land a good job, youll be making between 30-45k until youre over the 5 year experience mark. 70-80k is where it tops out. The salary things online and what colleges give is misleading. Youll get there eventually, just not right off the bat.

Thats not true at all. Graduated with a BS in Mechanical Design Engineering and have been working as a design engineer for a mobile equipment OEM for the past 3.5 years. I am far past those Salary figures. If you are a good engineer and work hard you can crush those salary numbers. I am fortunate to have grown up the son of a mechanic and not only have the book smarts my degree gave me but a very strong "real world" mechanical knowledge of things. Its the real world knowledge that has honestly helped me excel past people who have been working 10x longer than I have.

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1/8/2019 12:16 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/8/2019 12:17 PM

Brad460 wrote:

I worked for Yamaha Motor Corp right out of college in the R&D department. I traveled a lot testing all over the North America (upwards of 150 days a year on the road). It was great and I learned a lot. As I got older the traveling was too much so I left.

Anyways, my point is, its not at all difficult to find a job with an OEM. Check out this page- he does a lot of recruiting in the power sports business. Also check out the career pages from each OEM. Lots of jobs.

https://henrylonski.com/

scrallex wrote:

THIS! This is exactly what I was looking for! I'm not looking for a hand out here, more so some guidance from people who have a background similar to mine and with knowledge of how it worked for them. Thank you!!

ummmm...you need to read my post again then read your own post again. you are now starting to sound like a person that keeps going to different doctors until they find one that tells them what they want to hear.

if it was easy to get a job at an oem as brad460 so WRONGLY claims, you would probably already have one, either that or yamaha simply had a far lower criteria for hiring people then kawasaki did.

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1/8/2019 12:20 PM

kb228 wrote:

Ive been a tool and die design engineer for 6 years now. Best thing i can tell you is to get some experience. We have had BSME guys come in from ohio state or other colleges and they literally do not know how to design. Engineering isnt “get the degree and you know it.” Experienced guys will always outdo the guys with an expensive piece of paper. Ive been doing this for 6 years, and the degree guys come in and i train them. Yet i feel like i know nothing compared to our Sr designers with 15+ years in. Its really crazy.

That being said, those OEM companies like honda kawi ford chevy etc.. want extremely good designers. Theres guys like myself who do good as a tooling designer in a small town that designs based off what has worked in the past and that kind of stuff wont work for kawasaki. Then theres geniuses out there who design rediculously efficient engines or elaborate manufacturing machinery or soundproofing foam for car parts using tons of math and simulations. Thats who theyll try to pick up.

I dont know what to tell you to land a job in developing the latest high performance cylinder head. But i can tell you relevant experience is key. Maybe look for an internship in a place that develops engines or chassis for lawn mowers. I dont know.

Im sure other guys have some differing opinions, but this is just based on what ive seen.

scrallex wrote:

Trust me when I say that I understand what you mean. I showed up at my current job with the mentality that I don't know anything and that I need to keep my trap shut until my input is asked. And, if I'm being honest, it's worked out well for me. The machine that I get to call my own is made with roughly 40% of the components and has manufacturing near 50% of its brother models. I took my time learning the positions around the fab shop, the types of breaks that are preferred by our operators, and the access points that technicians have to mount components. There's no doubt in my mind that I could be as good if not better than any engineer in this industry in due time with the right people to guide me.

I know how to do the math. I know how to do the simulations. I'm no expert at either but I also feel that I'm not done learning. I will definitely consider your input of looking for employment in similar sectors such as mowers. Thank you!

Keep that attitude. I came into my job as a know it all from how much better i was in school compared to my classmates. Learned in about 2 days that i was on the fast track to nowhere. Didnt know jack shit and looked like an ass and still regret it.

Now days i learn how to design better from the shop guys ironically.

Good luck though for real. Dont let these negative nancies hold you back. Its not impossible.

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1/8/2019 12:23 PM

dickjackson170 wrote:

From someone with the same education and had the same desires as a young man, you will be financially better served by getting into gas and oil. Particularly where you're located in the country. I can afford to participate in as much moto as I want and I have professional experience to work anywhere in the country. Just some 2 cents from an old man.

I have more than one in with the oil industry. I was fortunate enough to make most of my friends inside the PE college at OU, which just happens to be the best college to get your PE degree in the country. I have buddies in multiple companies within the industry as well as good friends with a buddy who also rides and will be inheriting his family's exploration and production company sometime in the next decade. I was told by the owner that he would be happy to find a position for me after I graduate based on my experience at my current employment as well as starting and running a construction company with his son in 2017-18. I'm currently doing research for Schlumberger where I'm designing test equipment for high-pressure seals. We started last semester and I'll be finishing it up for my capstone this semester. I have a hunch that my involvement within my group as the lead designer for both mechanical and electrical will put me in the running for a job offer come graduation. I have already built a good relationship with the engineer overseeing our group and he has spoke highly of my efforts last semester in picking up the slack of our other group members. I just don't know if I'm ready to scrap my dreams of working on bikes just yet. Maybe though. I'm definitely not turning down options right now, inside the industry or not. I appreciate the input though, thank you!

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1/8/2019 12:23 PM

scrallex wrote:

That is insightful. I kind of assumed that engineers made good money no matter where they worked, but I don't have any proof that such is the case within our industry. I appreciate the input. Worst case scenario I stay outside the industry and line my pockets with plenty to spare for my hobby, I guess.

kb228 wrote:

Unless you land a good job, youll be making between 30-45k until youre over the 5 year experience mark. 70-80k is where it tops out. The salary things online and what colleges give is misleading. Youll get there eventually, just not right off the bat.

motox331 wrote:

Thats not true at all. Graduated with a BS in Mechanical Design Engineering and have been working as a design engineer for a mobile equipment OEM for the past 3.5 years. I am far past those Salary figures. If you are a good engineer and work hard you can crush those salary numbers. I am fortunate to have grown up the son of a mechanic and not only have the book smarts my degree gave me but a very strong "real world" mechanical knowledge of things. Its the real world knowledge that has honestly helped me excel past people who have been working 10x longer than I have.

Like i said, unless you get a good job. Those jobs are out there and are in bigger cities. But you pay at the cost of higher taxes.

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1/8/2019 12:27 PM

kb228 wrote:

Unless you land a good job, youll be making between 30-45k until youre over the 5 year experience mark. 70-80k is where it tops out. The salary things online and what colleges give is misleading. Youll get there eventually, just not right off the bat.

motox331 wrote:

Thats not true at all. Graduated with a BS in Mechanical Design Engineering and have been working as a design engineer for a mobile equipment OEM for the past 3.5 years. I am far past those Salary figures. If you are a good engineer and work hard you can crush those salary numbers. I am fortunate to have grown up the son of a mechanic and not only have the book smarts my degree gave me but a very strong "real world" mechanical knowledge of things. Its the real world knowledge that has honestly helped me excel past people who have been working 10x longer than I have.

kb228 wrote:

Like i said, unless you get a good job. Those jobs are out there and are in bigger cities. But you pay at the cost of higher taxes.

What exactly are you meaning by a "good job"? I had two job offers, one being in an extremely small city in Utah starting at 66k. And out of maybe 11 friends that got jobs at the same time as me, only one took a job under 50k but that was with a guaranteed increase up to 72k at the end of two years.

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1/8/2019 12:29 PM

kb228 wrote:

Unless you land a good job, youll be making between 30-45k until youre over the 5 year experience mark. 70-80k is where it tops out. The salary things online and what colleges give is misleading. Youll get there eventually, just not right off the bat.

motox331 wrote:

Thats not true at all. Graduated with a BS in Mechanical Design Engineering and have been working as a design engineer for a mobile equipment OEM for the past 3.5 years. I am far past those Salary figures. If you are a good engineer and work hard you can crush those salary numbers. I am fortunate to have grown up the son of a mechanic and not only have the book smarts my degree gave me but a very strong "real world" mechanical knowledge of things. Its the real world knowledge that has honestly helped me excel past people who have been working 10x longer than I have.

kb228 wrote:

Like i said, unless you get a good job. Those jobs are out there and are in bigger cities. But you pay at the cost of higher taxes.

im in a smaller midwestern town. Taxes for a 3 bed 2.5 bath home are like 4500 a year. Taxes arent high.... Not an unusual job nor is it a "good one" there are tons of jobs out there that will pay that for good engineers. Its not the "job" that gets you the salary its what you offer the company and how you sell yourself. Engineers are in high demand right now, if you arent getting close to 55k out of school then you arent trying to hard or you barely passed school.

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1/8/2019 12:33 PM

As a fellow ME I just want to say congrats and best of luck.

Maybe consider going about things a little differently. I though when I was in school a few years ago that I wanted an industry job, but honestly after talking with some people and kind of doing my own perceiving at races I decided it might not be the best idea for me personally. In the mean time I’ve taken a great job, not outstanding pay for my area but I love the people I work with every day. At the same time though, I’m constantly tinkering around with ideas and coming up with things here and there for my own bikes, and I figure maybe one day I’ll really come up with some sort of great idea or business model and be able to enter the industry on my own terms. Not at all trying to turn you away or change your plans, just thought I would throw this out there for consideration if thing don’t pan out exactly like you’re hoping.

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1/8/2019 12:35 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/8/2019 12:41 PM

motox331 wrote:

Thats not true at all. Graduated with a BS in Mechanical Design Engineering and have been working as a design engineer for a mobile equipment OEM for the past 3.5 years. I am far past those Salary figures. If you are a good engineer and work hard you can crush those salary numbers. I am fortunate to have grown up the son of a mechanic and not only have the book smarts my degree gave me but a very strong "real world" mechanical knowledge of things. Its the real world knowledge that has honestly helped me excel past people who have been working 10x longer than I have.

kb228 wrote:

Like i said, unless you get a good job. Those jobs are out there and are in bigger cities. But you pay at the cost of higher taxes.

Crash712 wrote:

What exactly are you meaning by a "good job"? I had two job offers, one being in an extremely small city in Utah starting at 66k. And out of maybe 11 friends that got jobs at the same time as me, only one took a job under 50k but that was with a guaranteed increase up to 72k at the end of two years.

The jobs you listed are good jobs.

I live in a small town of 50k in ohio. A $50k engineering job is for 10+ years of experience. I looked into getting a job at a publicly traded company that makes custom pumps, they offered me 15/hr at 5 years of experience. That company is widely regarded around here as an awesome high paying company.

I could move to columbus ohio or cleveland and get a 50-60k entry level job. But costs of living in those places is pretty high. $40k where i live goes way further than 50-60 in those cities does.

Its all based on location. Where i live sounds vastly different than where you do. Not arguing or anything..

Also you mentioned good engineers.. thats the key. Designing shelving and design car engines have different salaries.

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1/8/2019 12:44 PM

Move to Wisconsin and get a job at Harley. Closest you'll get to an OEM moto job and be paid what your worth.

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Race Bike: 2018 KTM 350SXF

Other Bikes: 1985 CR80R, 1990 CR250R, 1998 PW80, Specialized Fuse Comp 29.

Sold: 2016 YZ250F, 2012 CRF250R

1/8/2019 12:49 PM

scrallex:

I was in your exact shoes when I graduated with an M.E. degree in '97. I wanted so badly to work in the industry for an OEM raceteam. I took the route that most parents would advise against. I quit my first job out of college after a year and answered an ad in Cycle News for a privateer looking for a mechanic. The pay was ridiculously low ($200 a week cash)......but I got my foot in the door. After a few seasons I got to know a lot of people in the industry and built up a network. From there I was persistent and climbed the ladder. MX is an enthusiast market and it is a "dream job". What a dream job really means is: low pay (except for a few highly paid pro mechanics and R&D gurus), long hours, and 2,500 people that would love to have your job and will do it for less. lol

But....the memories I made, the people I met and the places I went are priceless. I did it when I was young and had no commitments. Did it hurt my earning potential early on? Sure it did. I could have made a lot more money early on "climbing the corporate ladder" at some boring desk job as an engineer. You have the rest of your life to slide into corporate america and hold a desk down. I said f-it and paid to play. I wouldn't trade those eight years working in the industry for anything. If you have a dream, chase it. Don't listen to the people telling you it's risky and impossible to get that dream job. The skills I learned in that "world" have paid dividends when I transitioned back into corporate america...yes.. corporate america was still there after my "sabbatical" lol. It was an itch I had to scratch and I have zero regrets.

Today I'm an engineer in aerospace holding a desk down (and looking lurking in Vitalmx) and financially in a good place. Alot of the experience I learned actually helped me down the road. Best of luck and follow your heart!

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1/8/2019 12:52 PM

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1/8/2019 1:01 PM

Brad460 wrote:

I worked for Yamaha Motor Corp right out of college in the R&D department. I traveled a lot testing all over the North America (upwards of 150 days a year on the road). It was great and I learned a lot. As I got older the traveling was too much so I left.

Anyways, my point is, its not at all difficult to find a job with an OEM. Check out this page- he does a lot of recruiting in the power sports business. Also check out the career pages from each OEM. Lots of jobs.

https://henrylonski.com/

scrallex wrote:

THIS! This is exactly what I was looking for! I'm not looking for a hand out here, more so some guidance from people who have a background similar to mine and with knowledge of how it worked for them. Thank you!!

barnett468 wrote:

ummmm...you need to read my post again then read your own post again. you are now starting to sound like a person that keeps going to different doctors until they find one that tells them what they want to hear.

if it was easy to get a job at an oem as brad460 so WRONGLY claims, you would probably already have one, either that or yamaha simply had a far lower criteria for hiring people then kawasaki did.

Okay. I understand your dismal outlook on the industry and I definitely consider your points. However, someone or a company that has a direct affiliation with the industry to the extent that they are contracted to fill open positions at multiple companies is less so going to different doctors until I find one that that tells me what I want to hear and more so a doctor that is offering a potential route for me to explore that may be what I'm looking for.

Once again, I appreciate your input. I definitely will take your advice into account but I don't feel it's completely set in stone that my opportunity is zero. Thank you, though.

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1/8/2019 1:03 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/8/2019 1:04 PM

When I was a senior in college, interviewing with companies, and sending out tons of resumes & letters, I inquired with a number of motorcycle industry companies. They were sent resumes, letters of introduction, and details of my motorcycling background, (I had worked as a motorcycle mechanic for 3 years after high school before going back to college to get an engineering degree). I never heard back from any of the MC related companies, not even "Ding Letters".

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“Adhering to 1970’s Standards of Political Correctness”

1/8/2019 1:05 PM

dickjackson170 wrote:

From someone with the same education and had the same desires as a young man, you will be financially better served by getting into gas and oil. Particularly where you're located in the country. I can afford to participate in as much moto as I want and I have professional experience to work anywhere in the country. Just some 2 cents from an old man.

scrallex wrote:

I have more than one in with the oil industry. I was fortunate enough to make most of my friends inside the PE college at OU, which just happens to be the best college to get your PE degree in the country. I have buddies in multiple companies within the industry as well as good friends with a buddy who also rides and will be inheriting his family's exploration and production company sometime in the next decade. I was told by the owner that he would be happy to find a position for me after I graduate based on my experience at my current employment as well as starting and running a construction company with his son in 2017-18. I'm currently doing research for Schlumberger where I'm designing test equipment for high-pressure seals. We started last semester and I'll be finishing it up for my capstone this semester. I have a hunch that my involvement within my group as the lead designer for both mechanical and electrical will put me in the running for a job offer come graduation. I have already built a good relationship with the engineer overseeing our group and he has spoke highly of my efforts last semester in picking up the slack of our other group members. I just don't know if I'm ready to scrap my dreams of working on bikes just yet. Maybe though. I'm definitely not turning down options right now, inside the industry or not. I appreciate the input though, thank you!

You bet bud. I'm not saying to give up on your dream. You can do anything want if you're willing to put in the work and sacrifice. Best of luck!

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