Dry as an old bone

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7/27/2018 12:37 PM

Went thru the boy's new 18 kx85 last night after picking it up Tuesday. Headset bearings and rear brake pivot bolt - dry, I mean no grease at all! 3 of the 4 wheel bearings - almost dry. Linkage - almost dry. Air filter, a little oil but not much. Cables - all dry. Spokes - tension all over the place, wheels were true at least, but....

If you are a first-time dirt bike buyer and take a bike like this out to ride, you will destroy a LOT of parts in the first month, have a very expensive labor bill to fix it, and a very unhappy kid. Neither the MFG or the dealer is doing the consumer any favors. SMH. Rant over, carry on.

Hammer 663s

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7/27/2018 12:39 PM

Nothing new, first thing anyone serious does when buying a new bike is re-greasing the parts.

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7/27/2018 1:39 PM

Talk to the dealer

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7/27/2018 1:45 PM

Andy_Greenney wrote:

Nothing new, first thing anyone serious does when buying a new bike is re-greasing the parts.

THIS ^^^^^^^^

If you buy a new bike and plan to keep it for more than a few months do yourself a favor and just grease the suspension properly before you go anywhere. All brands are like this. Kawasakis though are one of the worst. I have had roughly 12 new KX's through the years (from 1991 till 2011) . All of them lack grease from the factory. I'm on my 5th new Honda now and they are bit better with the grease but not by much!!

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Even a broken clock is right twice a day.

7/27/2018 1:51 PM

It's part of the shipping restrictions no volatile fluids etc. So they use assembly lube on the bearings to keep them from rusting. Dealer prep fee is supposed to pay for this but most dealers use it as a way to make cash cause most buyers don't demand it be done.
They think the dealer putting the bars n wheels on is what it's for.

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7/27/2018 2:02 PM

SmokinJoe439 wrote:

It's part of the shipping restrictions no volatile fluids etc. So they use assembly lube on the bearings to keep them from rusting. Dealer prep fee is supposed to pay for this but most dealers use it as a way to make cash cause most buyers don't demand it be done.
They think the dealer putting the bars n wheels on is what it's for.

No, you are not correct at all. The "dealer prep" fee is not taking the suspension apart and greasing it. Setup fee is just that. Setting the unit up. Honda uses a flat rate on dealer setup times so it is set and even as an experienced tech those times are impossible to beat if you set it up correctly. Which also does not instruct you to grease the suspension at all. Just make sure the bolts are torqued.

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Even a broken clock is right twice a day.

7/27/2018 2:50 PM

That's why it brings me so much overwhelming joy to pay the "set up fee" from dealers. I still go through everything myself.

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7/27/2018 2:51 PM

My 13 YZ250 and 16 KX450F were both bone dry also.

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7/27/2018 2:52 PM

I don't buy it's because of shipping restrictions. All the shit shipped to the usa from china is greased. So are imported cars.
No fun paying $9,000 for a new bike only to spend a day taking off the suspension/wheels/linkage/etc just to grease and reassemble it before riding it.

The less the dealer does the better. Why can't they just keep them in the crate since we have to break them down to that same point anyway?

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7/27/2018 2:57 PM

Been like this for years. So it goes, do it now or pay later.

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vomiting equals disqualification.

7/27/2018 2:59 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/27/2018 2:59 PM

Frank wrote:

I don't buy it's because of shipping restrictions. All the shit shipped to the usa from china is greased. So are imported cars.
No fun paying $9,000 for a new bike only to spend a day taking off the suspension/wheels/linkage/etc just to grease and reassemble it before riding it.

The less the dealer does the better. Why can't they just keep them in the crate since we have to break them down to that same point anyway?

Liability probably, but considering how some bikes come "prepped" from the dealer, pretty much a sham.

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vomiting equals disqualification.

7/27/2018 3:18 PM

The headset bearings, linkage and swingarm needle bearings should all come greased from the factory. That is not the dealers responsibility. The dealer just assembles the bike (usually just bars, controls and should oil the air filter). Never heard of greasing cables. In fact, I believe it's bad to grease cables.

The fun part of buying a new bike is going through all of this stuff and ensuring it's done properly with a 6 pack of beer and some good tunes.

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7/27/2018 3:21 PM

It's been this way for quite a few years. Around 2005 - 2010 I noticed bikes were coming with less and less grease. Has to do with importing rules and regulations on certain things....good bearing grease is one of them.

It does bother me though......that every bike shop out there , if they care for their customers , should inform them of this. Just riding it for a month or two ( especially in winter ) can literally destroy a bike! Newer people to this sport always seem to find out the hard way......the expensive way. Which blows!

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

7/27/2018 3:23 PM

Jeremy Macbeth wrote:

The headset bearings, linkage and swingarm needle bearings should all come greased from the factory. That is not the dealers responsibility. The dealer just assembles the bike (usually just bars, controls and should oil the air filter). Never heard of greasing cables. In fact, I believe it's bad to grease cables.

The fun part of buying a new bike is going through all of this stuff and ensuring it's done properly with a 6 pack of beer and some good tunes.

In regards to greasing cables, you should lube them up. If you have a rough clutch pull, lubing it can make all the difference since crud can get in over time. Lubing it will shoot all the dirt out the other end and grease the cable up so it’s smooth.

Maybe it’s not the most important thing to do, but I do it once or twice a year depending on how much I ride. It’s not like you have to do it after every ride, it’s just to maintain the cable and keep it from corroding or seizing.

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If you're not mixing gas, you're not haulin ass.

7/27/2018 3:24 PM

I remember the 90s when you could but your bike in the crate, save the setup fee and do it properly yourself and save some $ in the process. Had to ship the motor and suspension off anyway on the mod bikes so you had time to go through it properly

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7/27/2018 3:25 PM

the last thing that I want is a 18 year old lackey, setting up my 8 thousand dollar bike. But sometimes you have no choice.... As far back as I can remember, they come with little grease.......you need to take it apart yourself and regrease and loctite things if you want no hassles.....nothing new with that.

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7/27/2018 3:36 PM

Always stripped my brand new bikes down to grease everything, loctite certain fasteners, remove cheap chain & bars. Most bikes come with decent bars now, but most stock chains are junk. Don't forget to antisieze the swingarm chain adjuster bolts! I have to admit, on every new KTM I have bought in the last 8 years, I have ridden them for a few months before greasing them, they come greased from the factory..

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7/27/2018 6:37 PM

Yeah, I knew it would be like that. Only bitching cause it's 96 in the garage and I'm sweating like a pig.

I told the dealer don't do any prep, and that I prefer it in a crate, but they said they have to run it before they let it off the lot. And I don't mind going through it - lets me see how well it was designed and assembled. I can see why the KTMs are $2k more, this one is pretty primitive in materials and finish details. But, it's all done now and back together. I'll heat cycle it tomorrow and next week we'll go break it in.

Hammer 663s

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7/27/2018 7:11 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/27/2018 7:12 PM

Hammer 663s wrote:

Yeah, I knew it would be like that. Only bitching cause it's 96 in the garage and I'm sweating like a pig.

I told the dealer don't do any prep, and that I prefer it in a crate, but they said they have to run it before they let it off the lot. And I don't mind going through it - lets me see how well it was designed and assembled. I can see why the KTMs are $2k more, this one is pretty primitive in materials and finish details. But, it's all done now and back together. I'll heat cycle it tomorrow and next week we'll go break it in.

Hammer 663s

You mean overheat. Why? Go ride it and let the radiators and air shrouds do their jobs as designed.

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The older I get, the faster I was.

7/27/2018 7:29 PM

I've been taking care of my new and used bikes since the 60's by taking the time to lube them when I use and abuse them. If you love to ride , I hope you love to take care of them.

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Germany 1975 250 CZ Centerport, laydown shocks, mikuni with reed valve, Marzocchi forks with me as the motopilot

7/30/2018 8:36 AM

Hammer 663s wrote:

Yeah, I knew it would be like that. Only bitching cause it's 96 in the garage and I'm sweating like a pig.

I told the dealer don't do any prep, and that I prefer it in a crate, but they said they have to run it before they let it off the lot. And I don't mind going through it - lets me see how well it was designed and assembled. I can see why the KTMs are $2k more, this one is pretty primitive in materials and finish details. But, it's all done now and back together. I'll heat cycle it tomorrow and next week we'll go break it in.

Hammer 663s

Most of the time they have to run it as a sort of check against liability. They don’t want to sell you a bike that doesn’t run. If you are good friend’s with someone at the dealer or the general manager, you can sometimes get a bike still in the crate.

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If you're not mixing gas, you're not haulin ass.

7/30/2018 9:05 AM

TrailDigger wrote:

In regards to greasing cables, you should lube them up. If you have a rough clutch pull, lubing it can make all the difference since crud can get in over time. Lubing it will shoot all the dirt out the other end and grease the cable up so it’s smooth.

Maybe it’s not the most important thing to do, but I do it once or twice a year depending on how much I ride. It’s not like you have to do it after every ride, it’s just to maintain the cable and keep it from corroding or seizing.

I'm sorry, but that doesn't make any sense. If you introduce lube it's only going to attract more dirt. If the cables are that dirty, replace them. You shouldn't need to lube cables. Maybe something old timers did back in the stone age, but the sensible thing to do is replace them.

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7/30/2018 9:14 AM

Tim507 wrote:

I've been taking care of my new and used bikes since the 60's by taking the time to lube them when I use and abuse them. If you love to ride , I hope you love to take care of them.

Not quite that long, but remember when you had to almost build your new race bike to be competitive. Now people bitch about having to grease it.

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Take it to the limit, one more time!

7/30/2018 9:21 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/30/2018 9:22 AM

Tim507 wrote:

I've been taking care of my new and used bikes since the 60's by taking the time to lube them when I use and abuse them. If you love to ride , I hope you love to take care of them.

mx317 wrote:

Not quite that long, but remember when you had to almost build your new race bike to be competitive. Now people bitch about having to grease it.

I hated doing the KX85 so much that Sunday I did my neighbor's boy's new KX100 too. The KX100 I talked his Dad into buying since he was always over in my garage helping me with our dirt bikes. The one he needed after I took him to our track and he hammered on his old XR100 until he crashed in the whoops cause he was overriding that shitty XR suspension. His Dad has no clue on bikes, and the kid was dying to ride. He goes with me and my boy every time he can now.

I love to work on them almost as much as I love to ride them. I'd guess I'm on bike 30 since I started riding in 77, street and dirt. I've never taken a bike to the shop for any repair. Well, except for the rebuild on the RD250 I blew up back in 79.

Mike

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7/30/2018 9:41 AM

It was an automatic that you rolled a brand new bike in as soon as you get it and strip to the frame. It was like this no matter what, It is just what you did. Every single new bike I got went clear down, inspect the frame, learn the bike, drain every fluid including forks and shock. pulled the cylinder, regreased everything,and put on new bars and grips and springs with good oil.
I made every effort to have the bike as good as possible to live as long as possible as we rode and raced...a lot and it was our livelihood to do so.
we would even have our guy touch the ports and check squish and take a touch off the head to know where the baseline was from the factory.

conversely, as I haven't ridden in years, I have a friend that to this day has never taken his linkage apart on his 2014 450 honda.

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Was once there, now old, fat and tired... require much more horsepower now...

7/30/2018 9:44 AM

Jeremy Macbeth wrote:

I'm sorry, but that doesn't make any sense. If you introduce lube it's only going to attract more dirt. If the cables are that dirty, replace them. You shouldn't need to lube cables. Maybe something old timers did back in the stone age, but the sensible thing to do is replace them.

You are kidding.......right????

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Was once there, now old, fat and tired... require much more horsepower now...

7/30/2018 9:52 AM

goinrcn44h wrote:

You are kidding.......right????

No, not kidding, but I don't use shitty cheap cables that need to be lubed. Good cables are either teflon lined and/or sealed on both ends to prevent dirt from getting in there. If you lube teflon lined cables, it ruins the teflon liner. If you put a bunch of lube in the cable, it will attract dirt.

Lube away my friend... whatever works.

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7/30/2018 10:00 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/30/2018 10:01 AM

sandman768 wrote:

Always stripped my brand new bikes down to grease everything, loctite certain fasteners, remove cheap chain & bars. Most bikes come with decent bars now, but most stock chains are junk. Don't forget to antisieze the swingarm chain adjuster bolts! I have to admit, on every new KTM I have bought in the last 8 years, I have ridden them for a few months before greasing them, they come greased from the factory..

Same here. I rode Jap bikes for 30+ years and always had to tear them down and grease them. Vast majority were Honda's and they were severely lacking in grease.

Switched to KTM in 2010 and tore it down to find it was a waste of time as EVERY bearing was adequately greased. Same thing with the 2013 KTM I bought. It was good to go out of the crate. I haven't wasted my time with this "ritual" on my 2015, 2017 or 2019 KTM's. I have examined a couple of random bearings the last three bikes to ensure they haven't gone backwards and all I've checked have been excellent. I love not having to do this BS.

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7/30/2018 10:03 AM

I’ve worked as a dealer set up guy before-it’s horse shit. If the option was there to still get bikes in crates I’d say everyone should take it. My boss would bitch and moan any time it took me more than half an hour to uncrate and assemble a bike. Good luck giving everything a thorough run through in that amount of time.

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RPM Performance
CT
783

7/30/2018 10:11 AM

rikhek wrote:

Same here. I rode Jap bikes for 30+ years and always had to tear them down and grease them. Vast majority were Honda's and they were severely lacking in grease.

Switched to KTM in 2010 and tore it down to find it was a waste of time as EVERY bearing was adequately greased. Same thing with the 2013 KTM I bought. It was good to go out of the crate. I haven't wasted my time with this "ritual" on my 2015, 2017 or 2019 KTM's. I have examined a couple of random bearings the last three bikes to ensure they haven't gone backwards and all I've checked have been excellent. I love not having to do this BS.

Same. Pleased to find everything greased from factory on first KTM purchase. Dealer told me, didn’t believe him.

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