Do most people really do this??

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9/8/2020 12:42 PM

Photo

"You're using a tie-down to compress the rear suspension when you snug up all the bolts on your subframe and suspension linkage, right? If not, your sag measurement could vary widely."
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9/8/2020 12:47 PM

Never done that but I'll cycle the suspension a few times before tightening everything up

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9/8/2020 12:48 PM

I'm doing it right now

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9/8/2020 12:50 PM

That’s a first for me

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2011 Yamaha YZ 250 -MX
1996 Yamaha Banshee 350 -Trails
1982 Chevy S10
2005 Pontiac GTO -451rwhp

9/8/2020 12:56 PM

Also I don't think that's what's going on in this photo. Pretty sure the shock isn't hooked to the linkage here, mechanic maybe just need the rear wheel lifted to get to a bolt possibly? Seems like the fender would be pretty stressed if the shock was fully compressed

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9/8/2020 1:04 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/8/2020 1:04 PM

Bingo, soggy. Shock is not connected.
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9/8/2020 1:04 PM

soggy wrote:

Also I don't think that's what's going on in this photo. Pretty sure the shock isn't hooked to the linkage here, mechanic maybe just need the rear wheel lifted to get to a bolt possibly? Seems like the fender would be pretty stressed if the shock was fully compressed

Yes, you can clearly see that the lower shock bolt isn't installed.

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9/8/2020 1:06 PM

You don’t?

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9/8/2020 1:09 PM

Makes it easy to attach the linkage.

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9/8/2020 3:05 PM

Keeps the chain from being as tight as Facebook Marketplace chains.

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9/8/2020 3:19 PM

I do this when I tighten my sprocket bolts, don’t have to bend over quite so far.

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9/8/2020 3:23 PM

soggy wrote:

Also I don't think that's what's going on in this photo. Pretty sure the shock isn't hooked to the linkage here, mechanic maybe just need the rear wheel lifted to get to a bolt possibly? Seems like the fender would be pretty stressed if the shock was fully compressed

Okay, maybe I should have used the photo of Rene Zapata doing the same with Joey Savatgy's bike. That one was definitely hooked up. And yeah, it's common to see this in the pits.

Photo

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9/8/2020 4:13 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/8/2020 4:20 PM

When the rear axle, swing arm bolt and front sprocket shaft are in a strait line, that is the tightest point for chain slack. I do this on some bikes to find the correct chain slack. Different size sprockets and chain lengths can change the chain slack measurement from stock. Takes out the guess work when adjusting chain slack. Also helps when tightening subframe and linkage bolts..

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9/9/2020 1:38 PM

soggy wrote:

Also I don't think that's what's going on in this photo. Pretty sure the shock isn't hooked to the linkage here, mechanic maybe just need the rear wheel lifted to get to a bolt possibly? Seems like the fender would be pretty stressed if the shock was fully compressed

I was about to say, that’s a hell of a fender. The Suzuki is obviously much more on the subframe. Cool idea, hadn’t thought of this.

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9/9/2020 1:50 PM

Xeno wrote:

Bingo, soggy. Shock is not connected.
Photo


Where is your ppe guys, hard hat, safety glasses, orange vest, safety spotter, emergency response plan poster ? smile I would put the bike in gear, I see tie down slipping , tire rotating and bike flying on the ground. Ama should hire me as the safety director . Mandatory hazmat suit-hot suit, for fueling a bike,etc

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9/9/2020 1:55 PM

If you look close at Cooper's bike its actually just the bungee cord attached to the sprocket holding the rear end up. Savatgy's bike is actually strapped. I usually just compress the rear once to settle everything in. Ill change to the strap method now because the local C class is so competitive ever mm counts.

Do I need to order the KTM ratchet strap or can I use the Yamaha one I already have?

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9/9/2020 1:57 PM

BRX-WRX wrote:

When the rear axle, swing arm bolt and front sprocket shaft are in a strait line, that is the tightest point for chain slack. I do this on some bikes to find the correct chain slack. Different size sprockets and chain lengths can change the chain slack measurement from stock. Takes out the guess work when adjusting chain slack. Also helps when tightening subframe and linkage bolts..

This 100%. I do it to all my bikes to get the exact location where the chain is tightest, then make a piece of wood I can use to measure chain slack with zero guess work and/or reliance on the manual.

However I DO tighten my linkage and shock when it is under load - but I just lift up on the wheel as I tighten the bolts. Never heard of doing anything to tighten the subframe - doesn't make sense to me.

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9/9/2020 2:00 PM

Just pull the bike off of the stand and let it sit under its own weight. Cycle the suspension once or twice and let it come back to resting. Then go ahead and snug up the engine, swingarm and linkage in whatever order the manual for bike specifies. The tie down method seems way overkill.

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9/9/2020 2:50 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/9/2020 2:51 PM

Nah, man. It's fine. So is my clutch, completely put in all new shit last year... BTW, 100% serious.

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9/9/2020 2:51 PM

Surely the measurements are all relative, not absolutes. So it doesnt matter. And once you have your sag set for your rider and his preference, you have a spring length you work tooas well.

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9/9/2020 4:24 PM

Xeno wrote:

Bingo, soggy. Shock is not connected.
Photo


profeshenal125 wrote:

Where is your ppe guys, hard hat, safety glasses, orange vest, safety spotter, emergency response plan poster ? smile I would put the bike in gear, I see tie down slipping , tire rotating and bike flying on the ground. Ama should hire me as the safety director . Mandatory hazmat suit-hot suit, for fueling a bike,etc

Go get your Osha 40 cert ( 1 week ) and then Osha 500 cert. This will open up doors for working in construction projects nationwide at decent money. Decent money meaning 50K -100K annual. Just my useless 2 cents based on 41 years in construction.

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9/9/2020 4:27 PM

philG wrote:

Surely the measurements are all relative, not absolutes. So it doesnt matter. And once you have your sag set for your rider and his preference, you have a spring length you work tooas well.

That’s exactly what I was thinking, and if torquing things under load is throwing sag off to such a degree that it’s even measurable through all the potential error in the way most people measure sag then there’s some serious tolerance issues at play here.

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9/9/2020 5:00 PM

So the goal is to apply some force to the shock so it's not just in a resting/fully extended position to get a more accurate torque spec? Pardon my ignorance, I'm not a mechanic and just us a tape measure to get my sag set.

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9/9/2020 8:04 PM

Xeno wrote:

Bingo, soggy. Shock is not connected.
Photo


profeshenal125 wrote:

Where is your ppe guys, hard hat, safety glasses, orange vest, safety spotter, emergency response plan poster ? smile I would put the bike in gear, I see tie down slipping , tire rotating and bike flying on the ground. Ama should hire me as the safety director . Mandatory hazmat suit-hot suit, for fueling a bike,etc

ktmfun219 wrote:

Go get your Osha 40 cert ( 1 week ) and then Osha 500 cert. This will open up doors for working in construction projects nationwide at decent money. Decent money meaning 50K -100K annual. Just my useless 2 cents based on 41 years in construction.

Ok, osha 40 I hv that. At Michels pipeline hhg drilling, we had a 5 day class hz class 40 hrs every year. I always was chosen to wear the hot suit for a mock spill - 55 gal barrel of water spill. I was a bit weird checking my sag all the time or changing it. 2nd motos track changes , I change the sag sometimes.

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9/9/2020 8:22 PM

Bazaar, but I can see how you can be consistent with setting sag to the exact same number of spring with all tolerances removed. For me, weekend warrior anything close as I can assure I am sitting in the exact same spot.

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9/9/2020 9:18 PM

Man, that shit is WEAK. I pull the whole subframe and linkage when I am bleeding the front brake so that there is less weight on the rear of the bike . This allows a more consistent front/rear distribusionosity.

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9/10/2020 8:20 AM

Kennyfreemoney wrote: Photo

"You're using a tie-down to compress the rear suspension when you snug up all the bolts on your subframe and suspension linkage, right? If not, your sag measurement could vary widely."

Gotta find me some of those bungey cords.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

9/10/2020 8:43 AM

mx216 wrote:

Just pull the bike off of the stand and let it sit under its own weight. Cycle the suspension once or twice and let it come back to resting. Then go ahead and snug up the engine, swingarm and linkage in whatever order the manual for bike specifies. The tie down method seems way overkill.

I learned that from you Joel! Makes a lot of sense too.

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9/10/2020 8:54 AM

Pink wrote:

I do this when I tighten my sprocket bolts, don’t have to bend over quite so far.

Tighten or torque them?

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9/10/2020 12:52 PM

BRX-WRX wrote:

When the rear axle, swing arm bolt and front sprocket shaft are in a strait line, that is the tightest point for chain slack. I do this on some bikes to find the correct chain slack. Different size sprockets and chain lengths can change the chain slack measurement from stock. Takes out the guess work when adjusting chain slack. Also helps when tightening subframe and linkage bolts..

Yep! The only way to get proper chain tension. Maybe some other reasons, but thats one.

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