Did Baggett mentally set up Anderson where he would seal the deal after he passed him? (I'll explain)

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1/13/2019 11:17 AM

This is a long post but bare with me, this isn't just rambling...

When I was watching the main event last night, I was wondering why Blake kept going outside before the SX triple (the step on step off section) when it was clearly slower (by half a second or so). I understand the concept of not following the leader, but I have a theory as to why he did that. Baggett clearly knew he had the speed to pass Jason, and at this point in the race he was setting him up for a pass. When they came around that section with 1:40 left on the clock, he followed Anderson through the inside despite going outside the prior 3-4 laps (or more, he wasn't on screen during those laps).

Blake set up Anderson in the next corner and passed him. The pass itself is interesting because in most situations the rider in Blake's position will check up and square up the rider ahead of them into the next corner, controlling the corner. Blake knew that Anderson would expect this, and Anderson went into pure defensive mode entering the corner while Blake left the throttle late and took the position over him. It's a risky pass, but genius.

Onto what I was saying earlier, though... Blake kept going outside (the slower line) before the triple and I wasn't sure why... I think I know why now... Blake knew he was going quicker than Anderson everywhere else on the track and was confident enough to sacrifice the half second or so in that section. After he passed Jason, he dropped him pretty quick, but he was probably expecting Anderson to fight back more than he did. I noticed the following lap Anderson tried that outside line that Baggett kept going lap after lap while hounding him, and Baggett gained a half second or so on him in... Completely irrelevant at this point in the race since Baggett checked out, but if Anderson responded like you'd expect the defending champ to, then that half second could have been the difference between Anderson being close enough to strike back or not.

I might be looking too deeply into it, but I think it was an incredibly high race IQ by Blake to do that, knowing it was slower, and knowing Jason would try that line after he got passed thinking Blake was using that line still. Feel free to call me an idiot, since you guys love to do that shit, but I think there was more to this than "not following the leader".

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1/13/2019 11:22 AM

Bagget was clearly faster. I think Ando was just gassed from trying to run the pace in front. Got passed and had nothing left.

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1/13/2019 11:23 AM

If you watched the press conference you would have heard that Blake was going outside because he was struggling with traction. He didn't feel comfortable doing the triple on.

Pass was insane though.

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Not much to say to Vitards.

1/13/2019 11:23 AM

Anderson was spent. After blake got by him, kenny closed the gap to anderson lap after lap which wasnt the case before that.

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1/13/2019 11:47 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/13/2019 11:49 AM

I don't think it had anything to do with Baggett. He looked over his shoulder all night. Maybe he was gassed and was looking to see who was coming and where he would finish.

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1/13/2019 11:53 AM

devindavisphoto wrote:

This is a long post but bare with me, this isn't just rambling...

When I was watching the main event last night, I was wondering why Blake kept going outside before the SX triple (the step on step off section) when it was clearly slower (by half a second or so). I understand the concept of not following the leader, but I have a theory as to why he did that. Baggett clearly knew he had the speed to pass Jason, and at this point in the race he was setting him up for a pass. When they came around that section with 1:40 left on the clock, he followed Anderson through the inside despite going outside the prior 3-4 laps (or more, he wasn't on screen during those laps).

Blake set up Anderson in the next corner and passed him. The pass itself is interesting because in most situations the rider in Blake's position will check up and square up the rider ahead of them into the next corner, controlling the corner. Blake knew that Anderson would expect this, and Anderson went into pure defensive mode entering the corner while Blake left the throttle late and took the position over him. It's a risky pass, but genius.

Onto what I was saying earlier, though... Blake kept going outside (the slower line) before the triple and I wasn't sure why... I think I know why now... Blake knew he was going quicker than Anderson everywhere else on the track and was confident enough to sacrifice the half second or so in that section. After he passed Jason, he dropped him pretty quick, but he was probably expecting Anderson to fight back more than he did. I noticed the following lap Anderson tried that outside line that Baggett kept going lap after lap while hounding him, and Baggett gained a half second or so on him in... Completely irrelevant at this point in the race since Baggett checked out, but if Anderson responded like you'd expect the defending champ to, then that half second could have been the difference between Anderson being close enough to strike back or not.

I might be looking too deeply into it, but I think it was an incredibly high race IQ by Blake to do that, knowing it was slower, and knowing Jason would try that line after he got passed thinking Blake was using that line still. Feel free to call me an idiot, since you guys love to do that shit, but I think there was more to this than "not following the leader".

Yea I can see that pretty smart too. I think the outside pass was a bit dumb tho after watching Ando take out Ken you essentially set yourself up to be block passed while passing for the lead. He put himself in the 1 spot to get punted if Ando wanted to, thankfully he didnt. Either way Blake was muuch faster and gapped him immediately. This really is a 5 way fight between Ken, Eli, Barcia, Anderson, with Musquin looking to round into form.

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