Brian Moreau

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9/6/2020 7:22 PM

Is anyone else a little concerned for Brian’s mental health? I’ve been keeping up with his social media and it seemed like at first he was pretty motivated to get back to work but at this point he just seems depressed. I understand that with the severity of his injuries and the career he had ahead of him there would definitely be some sadness in that situation but it seems to be a little past that.

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9/6/2020 7:29 PM

Yeah he’s definitely bummed. I’m sure most guys are/would be in his shoes. Some people just don’t vocalize or spread it into the public as much as others. Feel super bad for the kid or anybody really thats had to go through that. I can’t even imagine.

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9/6/2020 7:40 PM

Well, I can tell you first hand that it is not easy. Complications after the injury that you don’t suspect and the overall changes daily. You start to think about not swimming in the ocean, or walking along the beach with your girl. You struggle with the fact that the simplest tasks are now difficult. It’s a different world

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9/6/2020 8:07 PM

Any more recent updates? Last I can find was from April...

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9/6/2020 8:12 PM

Brad460 wrote:

Any more recent updates? Last I can find was from April...

Not really any updates. He’s posted a few things on his instagram that show he’s pretty down and out and not in a good mental place.

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9/6/2020 8:19 PM

Damn, thread title had me hoping for some positive news. So sorry to read this. I hope things improve for the young man. Shitty deal for Brian

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9/6/2020 8:44 PM

Dirtydeeds wrote:

Not really any updates. He’s posted a few things on his instagram that show he’s pretty down and out and not in a good mental place.

I did see that...Was hoping for some better (more recent) news..

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9/6/2020 9:33 PM

He posted a video, of him riding a stationary bike with what looked like no assists and being able to hold himself up.. I took it as a good sign, however i have no other insight.

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"Life is Too Short To Last Long"

9/6/2020 9:38 PM

Zycki11 wrote:

Well, I can tell you first hand that it is not easy. Complications after the injury that you don’t suspect and the overall changes daily. You start to think about not swimming in the ocean, or walking along the beach with your girl. You struggle with the fact that the simplest tasks are now difficult. It’s a different world

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

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9/7/2020 2:31 AM

He was about to go out into the world and make his place. Now for the rest of his life he will be chair-bound and dependent on others to take care of him. I reckon it must be extremely hard to come to terms with all of that. He's so young and has so many years ahead of him, I imagine it must be daunting because he's probably thinking of all the things he's gonna miss.

Same goes for Killian Auberson. A few get well soon posts and then they are left alone to go do something else, but it will be much more difficult. To go from a stadium full of people watching you with admiration, to people feeling pity for you when they see you struggle to do the most basic things. I cannot imagine how anyone can deal with that.

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9/7/2020 3:17 AM

Francis377 wrote:

He was about to go out into the world and make his place. Now for the rest of his life he will be chair-bound and dependent on others to take care of him. I reckon it must be extremely hard to come to terms with all of that. He's so young and has so many years ahead of him, I imagine it must be daunting because he's probably thinking of all the things he's gonna miss.

Same goes for Killian Auberson. A few get well soon posts and then they are left alone to go do something else, but it will be much more difficult. To go from a stadium full of people watching you with admiration, to people feeling pity for you when they see you struggle to do the most basic things. I cannot imagine how anyone can deal with that.

I work in disability.
Most clients have life long mental health n depression and suicidal issues.

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9/7/2020 4:24 AM

Would be an incredibly hard position to be in obviously. Jessy Nelson's insta profil was hard to read for a long time. He seems much better now but obviously it would be gut-wrenching to comprehend the life-change.

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Cheers, Crush
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9/7/2020 4:30 AM

Zycki11 wrote:

Well, I can tell you first hand that it is not easy. Complications after the injury that you don’t suspect and the overall changes daily. You start to think about not swimming in the ocean, or walking along the beach with your girl. You struggle with the fact that the simplest tasks are now difficult. It’s a different world

Rdracer598 wrote:

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

Well it kinda is and it's kinda not, wouldn't you say? (That bad) I'm usually pretty happy go lucky and like to think I've got a positive outlook on life but I can definitely have my bad days..

I would tell anyone newly injured.. Yep ya life will prob suck comparatively but it will not suck as much as you think it will

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why am I reading this? ..... Oh christ, now I'm posting...... shiiiiiiiit!!

9/7/2020 4:35 AM

Crush wrote:

Would be an incredibly hard position to be in obviously. Jessy Nelson's insta profil was hard to read for a long time. He seems much better now but obviously it would be gut-wrenching to comprehend the life-change.

I was gonna put this in my other post but forgot haha but you reminded me with your post so I'm quotin ya shut up!

The biggest thing I struggled with was the feeling of being 'ripped off' by life and I can't even imagine how ripped off Brian feels (Jessy too) and I would suggest it would be extremely hard to get over

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why am I reading this? ..... Oh christ, now I'm posting...... shiiiiiiiit!!

9/7/2020 4:44 AM

Crush wrote:

Would be an incredibly hard position to be in obviously. Jessy Nelson's insta profil was hard to read for a long time. He seems much better now but obviously it would be gut-wrenching to comprehend the life-change.

jemcee wrote:

I was gonna put this in my other post but forgot haha but you reminded me with your post so I'm quotin ya shut up!

The biggest thing I struggled with was the feeling of being 'ripped off' by life and I can't even imagine how ripped off Brian feels (Jessy too) and I would suggest it would be extremely hard to get over

Yeah mate, can imagine it would be a complete shit-show of emotion.

For these guys where there are stars in their eyes maybe more so, but at the end of the day it doesn't matter if you were destined for titles or a relatively normal life, you would know how massive of an adjustment it would be...

Add in these guys are young and emotionally still developing, fuck, can't imagine.

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Cheers, Crush
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9/7/2020 5:06 AM

Crush wrote:

Yeah mate, can imagine it would be a complete shit-show of emotion.

For these guys where there are stars in their eyes maybe more so, but at the end of the day it doesn't matter if you were destined for titles or a relatively normal life, you would know how massive of an adjustment it would be...

Add in these guys are young and emotionally still developing, fuck, can't imagine.

Yeah 100%
Being in the hospital helped.. 8 months surrounded by all the other ages and accidents you realise pretty quick there's no rhyme or reason to it. No one is more or less hard done by.. Just in my room there was me 24 C7, a 16 year old kid C5 (Rugby) who was yet to experience too much of life, a 40 year old C4 (quick body surf after mowing his lawn) who was just starting his 'adult life' and a 20 year old dude that broke his back pissed on a roadbike who hated himself because of it.. All of us going through the same shit all of our families goin through the same shit..

I've said it a million times but a Taxi driver said to me once "The human body is equipped to go 7 km/h and not bump into anything" haha

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why am I reading this? ..... Oh christ, now I'm posting...... shiiiiiiiit!!

9/7/2020 7:03 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/7/2020 7:04 AM

jemcee wrote:

Yeah 100%
Being in the hospital helped.. 8 months surrounded by all the other ages and accidents you realise pretty quick there's no rhyme or reason to it. No one is more or less hard done by.. Just in my room there was me 24 C7, a 16 year old kid C5 (Rugby) who was yet to experience too much of life, a 40 year old C4 (quick body surf after mowing his lawn) who was just starting his 'adult life' and a 20 year old dude that broke his back pissed on a roadbike who hated himself because of it.. All of us going through the same shit all of our families goin through the same shit..

I've said it a million times but a Taxi driver said to me once "The human body is equipped to go 7 km/h and not bump into anything" haha

What those stories say is "anything can happen at any time." That's good to keep in mind.

I know when my 11-year old son died that it was strangely comforting walking thru the tiny country cemetery where he's buried and seeing that about 1/3 of the graves there are children under 12, most from the 20's-30's when the Spanish Flu was devastating. Many with mother/child buried together, or the mother a month later. Makes you realize you're not the first and certainly not the last and definitely not alone.

My younger son- about to hit 17 now- is pretty damn fast and it worries me a LOT sometimes but.... we live on a ranch. At any given moment, it could be a bull, a rattlesnake, a gun accident, a rollover (equipment or pickup), a poacher, lightning, or God only know what. And I personally KNOW people who've died or been disabled from each one of these things. So... we just do the best we can and carry on. Hope I can keep that attitude when it's me in the chair.

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2019 KTM 150 SX
2015 Yamaha YZ 250

9/7/2020 8:23 AM

Francis377 wrote:

He was about to go out into the world and make his place. Now for the rest of his life he will be chair-bound and dependent on others to take care of him. I reckon it must be extremely hard to come to terms with all of that. He's so young and has so many years ahead of him, I imagine it must be daunting because he's probably thinking of all the things he's gonna miss.

Same goes for Killian Auberson. A few get well soon posts and then they are left alone to go do something else, but it will be much more difficult. To go from a stadium full of people watching you with admiration, to people feeling pity for you when they see you struggle to do the most basic things. I cannot imagine how anyone can deal with that.

If I remember correctly Brian broke C 6-7. He should be able to live independently and not have to rely on anyone to take care of him. Hopefully he has a mentor showing him he can do everything for himself and get him into a sport

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9/7/2020 8:29 AM

Zycki11 wrote:

Well, I can tell you first hand that it is not easy. Complications after the injury that you don’t suspect and the overall changes daily. You start to think about not swimming in the ocean, or walking along the beach with your girl. You struggle with the fact that the simplest tasks are now difficult. It’s a different world

Rdracer598 wrote:

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

jemcee wrote:

Well it kinda is and it's kinda not, wouldn't you say? (That bad) I'm usually pretty happy go lucky and like to think I've got a positive outlook on life but I can definitely have my bad days..

I would tell anyone newly injured.. Yep ya life will prob suck comparatively but it will not suck as much as you think it will

Yeah there’s some days that can suck because of the chair. Shit takes us twice as long as a able body can be frustrating.

I was thankful my injury happened at 26 and not at 16. I was hoping I’d be able to see Brian at the hospital here in Tampa but they transferred him before he went into the rehab department.

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9/7/2020 2:01 PM

Rdracer598 wrote:

Yeah there’s some days that can suck because of the chair. Shit takes us twice as long as a able body can be frustrating.

I was thankful my injury happened at 26 and not at 16. I was hoping I’d be able to see Brian at the hospital here in Tampa but they transferred him before he went into the rehab department.

You’re a good person.

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9/7/2020 3:36 PM

Rdracer598 wrote:

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

I would assume your looking at this through glasses that have been dealing with the circumstance for quite some time? Everyone was asking what it was like. For me, I was injured in March of this year. I have a great positive attitude, yet you do have thoughts that cross your mind about things you think you won’t be able to do.

With that said, I’m lucky I have someone who is positive and tough as well. Always need to have a goal to move forward and not look back.

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9/7/2020 7:26 PM

I feel for the guy, I love motorcycles more than anything and have been on them since age 4 and am 31, but after a tbi and multiple concussions, I sold my equipment at the beginning of the year after a small head impact which has made me moderately disabled. I didn't watch or pay attention to anything for a while, and just feel lost a bit in life with out it. I am not able to work yet or really live a normal life but am getting there. Definitely grateful I can walk and am as capable as I am but life changes are rough and trying to find something else that gives that sense of wonderment and freedom is nearly impossible. Also, having compassion is the most important thing. Even if he/we seem to be 'down' - chances are we are still fighting every bit as hard as when it seemed like we were doing good or likely even harder. Sometimes the winds are with your sails, sometimes there is no wind or sail.

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9/8/2020 4:31 AM

Zycki11 wrote:

I would assume your looking at this through glasses that have been dealing with the circumstance for quite some time? Everyone was asking what it was like. For me, I was injured in March of this year. I have a great positive attitude, yet you do have thoughts that cross your mind about things you think you won’t be able to do.

With that said, I’m lucky I have someone who is positive and tough as well. Always need to have a goal to move forward and not look back.

February was 15 years for me. C 5/6 quad. I surprised myself with how well I handled it. Positive attitude is key to recovery. Being hard headed helps some too lol. My motivation came from wanting to prove Doctors wrong and wanting to become independent as fast as I could.

Getting into wheelchair rugby 3 months after my injury helped me tremendously. I was able to pick their brains about everything I had questions on and seeing a guy at my level be independent I knew I would also be

What level are you?

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9/8/2020 6:22 AM

My 10 year old daughter was born with Spina Bifida which is the equivalent of a spinal cord injury. I am confident, that by the time she is an adult, paralysis will be a thing of the past. Elon Musk's company Neuralink are on the heels of human trials with their implant. I have to believe that 10-15 years from now there will be noone constrained to wheel chairs anymore.

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9/8/2020 7:25 AM

Zycki11 wrote:

Well, I can tell you first hand that it is not easy. Complications after the injury that you don’t suspect and the overall changes daily. You start to think about not swimming in the ocean, or walking along the beach with your girl. You struggle with the fact that the simplest tasks are now difficult. It’s a different world

Rdracer598 wrote:

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

How long have you been in a chair? I had your same positive attitude for about 15 years and unfortunately this is getting old! Any advice-T7 complete

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9/8/2020 7:57 AM

Rdracer598 wrote:

February was 15 years for me. C 5/6 quad. I surprised myself with how well I handled it. Positive attitude is key to recovery. Being hard headed helps some too lol. My motivation came from wanting to prove Doctors wrong and wanting to become independent as fast as I could.

Getting into wheelchair rugby 3 months after my injury helped me tremendously. I was able to pick their brains about everything I had questions on and seeing a guy at my level be independent I knew I would also be

What level are you?

Para. I had a freak accident practicing and burst fractured my T-10, fractured my T-11, broke 3 ribs, and punctured both lungs. Earned a life flight! It was crazy because I laid on the track for 2 hours before the EMT showed up, followed by another 45 minutes roughly for the heli.

As I was laying, I had an incredible burning sensation in my lower abdomen and kept telling the EMT I thought I had internal bleeding. Come to find out it was my nerves.

All in all, I wouldn’t change it. I love this sport and knew the risks. I at least got to experience it for 20 years before it happened.

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9/8/2020 10:02 AM

Zycki11 wrote:

I would assume your looking at this through glasses that have been dealing with the circumstance for quite some time? Everyone was asking what it was like. For me, I was injured in March of this year. I have a great positive attitude, yet you do have thoughts that cross your mind about things you think you won’t be able to do.

With that said, I’m lucky I have someone who is positive and tough as well. Always need to have a goal to move forward and not look back.

Rdracer598 wrote:

February was 15 years for me. C 5/6 quad. I surprised myself with how well I handled it. Positive attitude is key to recovery. Being hard headed helps some too lol. My motivation came from wanting to prove Doctors wrong and wanting to become independent as fast as I could.

Getting into wheelchair rugby 3 months after my injury helped me tremendously. I was able to pick their brains about everything I had questions on and seeing a guy at my level be independent I knew I would also be

What level are you?

Zycki11 wrote:

Para. I had a freak accident practicing and burst fractured my T-10, fractured my T-11, broke 3 ribs, and punctured both lungs. Earned a life flight! It was crazy because I laid on the track for 2 hours before the EMT showed up, followed by another 45 minutes roughly for the heli.

As I was laying, I had an incredible burning sensation in my lower abdomen and kept telling the EMT I thought I had internal bleeding. Come to find out it was my nerves.

All in all, I wouldn’t change it. I love this sport and knew the risks. I at least got to experience it for 20 years before it happened.

That’s insane!!! Can’t believe you laid there for so long. My dad came onto the track after I was on the backboard, grabbed my feet and asked if I could feel them. I never lost my touch sensation just can’t move them.

Mine was a freak crash also. I was on a warm up lap and high sided at maybe 40-50 mph. Never thought a low speed crash would end up like it did. High sided at 130 racing in Wisconsin and walked away the year prior

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9/8/2020 10:06 AM

Zycki11 wrote:

Well, I can tell you first hand that it is not easy. Complications after the injury that you don’t suspect and the overall changes daily. You start to think about not swimming in the ocean, or walking along the beach with your girl. You struggle with the fact that the simplest tasks are now difficult. It’s a different world

Rdracer598 wrote:

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

cdiesel711 wrote:

How long have you been in a chair? I had your same positive attitude for about 15 years and unfortunately this is getting old! Any advice-T7 complete

Just over 15 years for me. Find something to keep you active. I play wheelchair rugby, handcycle and water ski. Just get out of the house as much as possible. If you ever need to talk to someone hit me up. Where do you live?
Trust me this quarantine had me down a few days. Once I got back into working out and getting outside it got better

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9/8/2020 10:59 AM

Rdracer598 wrote:

Lmao. It’s seriously not that bad. Oh we can still swim and surf in the ocean and walking on the beach isn’t that big of a deal. We just roll down it now.

Yes it’s a mind fuck in the beginning. You feel like a infant having to relearn daily activities that everyone takes for granted. Especially pissing and pooping on your own but once you get everything figured out and get active it beats the alternative.

cdiesel711 wrote:

How long have you been in a chair? I had your same positive attitude for about 15 years and unfortunately this is getting old! Any advice-T7 complete

Rdracer598 wrote:

Just over 15 years for me. Find something to keep you active. I play wheelchair rugby, handcycle and water ski. Just get out of the house as much as possible. If you ever need to talk to someone hit me up. Where do you live?
Trust me this quarantine had me down a few days. Once I got back into working out and getting outside it got better

Hey thanks man, crazy how many people in chairs are here on vital. I’m actually busy as ever traveling the world with my son in his bmx career (@caidenbmx) i do a fair amount of handcycling also have RZRs and just built up a kawi 636 with (Landing gearsmile and electric shifter. Still just over it! But I’m sure everyone has ups and downs and of course could always be worse

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9/8/2020 12:05 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/8/2020 12:06 PM

cdiesel711 wrote:

Hey thanks man, crazy how many people in chairs are here on vital. I’m actually busy as ever traveling the world with my son in his bmx career (@caidenbmx) i do a fair amount of handcycling also have RZRs and just built up a kawi 636 with (Landing gearsmile and electric shifter. Still just over it! But I’m sure everyone has ups and downs and of course could always be worse

I took a look on your son's IG page. He is so talented, amazing skills! Congratulations on that and in your positive attitude! All best.

FC

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