Bike wanting to stand up in turns

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5/30/2018 9:10 AM

What are all your thoughts on this, in general. It doesn't seem to want to settle into rutted corner and often wants to stand itself up.

No enough sag? (set at 100mm)
Too much low speed compression damping on rear?

My feeling is its influenced by the shock, but could be wrong!

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5/30/2018 9:45 AM

Is it a 2007 yz450f?

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5/30/2018 10:05 AM

Did you look at your technique?

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5/30/2018 10:10 AM

It could be anything really, technique included

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5/30/2018 10:24 AM

It's your technique. Finger on the front brake, dragging it thru the turn to modulate speed with steady, even throttle. If you let off the gas or chop the throttle, the suspension unloads, causing it to climb out of the rut.

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"Hope is not a strategy"

5/30/2018 10:33 AM

What bike? Is your suspension setup for you? We need more info man

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2017 RMZ450
2005 YZ250-sold :,(
1998 YZ250
2005 KX250F

80% of the time it works every time
IG @2HRacing
Thanks to : Factory Effex, N2Dirt, Acerbis, DT1, Fasthouse, Matix, FMF, ASV, 100% & Mika Metals

5/30/2018 10:40 AM

Its a RM 250, so it should turn.

Yes, had the suspension set up by Pro Action recently as well. I think my next riding session this week will focus on turns and technique.

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5/30/2018 10:53 AM

Do you have a tall seat on it? I'm 6' and sometimes prefer taller seats, but I can tell sometimes that the taller ride height makes a bike harder to turn and stand up in turns.

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5/30/2018 10:54 AM

From experience focusing on technique too much, especially outside elbow up, can have a negative effect as you will stiffen your upper body. Focus on turning the bars and keeping loose arms and shoulders. What makes this sport great is it’s difficult to master. Good luck and report back!

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5/30/2018 10:57 AM

piscokid wrote:

It's your technique. Finger on the front brake, dragging it thru the turn to modulate speed with steady, even throttle. If you let off the gas or chop the throttle, the suspension unloads, causing it to climb out of the rut.

This.
+ use your rear break and throttle (carefully) before entering a corner (when there are breaking bumps) to stabilize the bike. That way its easier to get a clean run in to the ruts.

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5/30/2018 11:44 AM

slow the rebound on your shock

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5/30/2018 11:46 AM

More rebound damping will assist you to a degree

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5/30/2018 2:07 PM

My 2005 RM250 was set up by Bob at Pro Action in Ohio. Turns awesome! No complaints over jumps and bumps. It could use a little fine tuning if I rode more but its pretty damb good. I am 6ft 1in 215 pounds.

My sag is at 110. Forks are close to flush with the top triple clamp Photo

More sag, Weight the outside peg, and lean it over.

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5/30/2018 2:40 PM

Get your head in the game. All too often riders get their heads out of position in rutted corners. Your head should be aligned with your spine and even a few degrees tilted into the corner. Where the head goes the body-bike will follow. Oh ... and get up on the tank. Hope this helps, it did for me.

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5/30/2018 4:05 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/30/2018 4:10 PM

As you enter the turn make sure that you are looking far ahead of where you are. You want to be looking where you are going not where you are, such as looking directly in front of your front wheel. If you don't look ahead, your bike will want to stand up as you turn. Start looking ahead and the bike will lean into the turn like you want it to. When you are in the middle of the turn you should be looking toward the exit. If this is something that your not doing it will feel strange at first but it will become second nature. Look at photos at any of the AMA pros at any point approaching, middle or exiting a turn and you will notice that they are always looking way ahead no matter where they are located at in the turn.
John

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5/30/2018 4:10 PM

front suspension too hard? rear suspension too soft?
Maybe work on your technique? maybe raise the forks a little bit in the triple clamps?

Stuff I would check

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5/30/2018 4:13 PM

I don't know a lot about bike setup but how fast are you entering the corner? It's also important to note how far you're leaning over congruent to the speed you're entering the corner with.

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5/30/2018 4:23 PM

Thanks for the input all, good stuff to work on going forward !

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5/30/2018 5:26 PM

On my RMZ450 l had the same problem, l backed off the idle rpm a little and fixed it, l don't think that would be your issue with a 2-stroke, my call is, more rebound damping on the forks, l wonder if the rear spring is too soft for your weight?

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Melbourne, Australia. Current rides: '11 RMZ450, '84 CR500, '06 DRZ400, '79 KX250 with 400 engine, '06 GSXR1000 full Yosh racebike.

5/30/2018 5:45 PM

Per Dirt Rider Suzuki recommends 100mm sag but preferred 106.

I would try 105 and see how you like it.

Also, is the spring correct for your weight? Critically important.

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5/30/2018 5:47 PM

I had this problem on my supermoto, it would turn then stand up, turn then stand up etc. I raised the forks into the triple clamp about 5mm and it completely changed the cornering of the bike and fixed the issue for me.

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5/30/2018 5:51 PM

"It's the Indian, not the arrow."

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5/30/2018 5:52 PM

I would hope the spring rate is correct it was changed with the revalve and I didn’t even lie about my weight!

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5/30/2018 5:52 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/30/2018 5:53 PM

I had the same bike, same issue. Its technique. I found I had to be on it and doing everything proper to take advantage of its turning capabilities. Any bit of laziness and it wants to stand up. So I stuck the motor in an RMZ450 frame and now I can be lazy.

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5/30/2018 6:08 PM

“Unhinge your hips....”

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5/30/2018 6:50 PM

piscokid wrote:

It's your technique. Finger on the front brake, dragging it thru the turn to modulate speed with steady, even throttle. If you let off the gas or chop the throttle, the suspension unloads, causing it to climb out of the rut.

matze wrote:

This.
+ use your rear break and throttle (carefully) before entering a corner (when there are breaking bumps) to stabilize the bike. That way its easier to get a clean run in to the ruts.

^This

In more detail:

Assuming you are riding in the attack position into the turn. Butt back, proper back angle, on the brakes. Transition from standing to sitting right before turning in, get off of the back break, leg out, inside elbow up, on the gas to suck the bike into the rut, if needed, front brake to control speed, accelerate thru the rut, lean with the bike. Do not sit up or shift your weight to the outside of the bike. To many people like to move to the outside of the seat and hook their butt crack on the edge. If you drop your inside elbow, the bike will follow, if you let off of the gas, the suspension unloads, it climbs up the face of the rut. If you are not leaning with the bike, the bike will climb out of the rut. Just practice this technique.

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"Hope is not a strategy"

5/30/2018 6:52 PM

A lot of people are suggesting technique but I'm assuming you're saying the bike doesn't turn in comparison to past bikes you've ridden. That would suggest it actually is setup. I've had this issue with some bikes and many times the high speed comp in the rear shock ended up being too stiff. I'd loosen It a half turn or so and it'd settle in turns and feel awesome. I could be wrong but it's worth a shot

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5/30/2018 7:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/30/2018 7:10 PM

Tire pressure can cause this as well. Too little can add for too much traction and make the bike want to stand up in the corners/crawl out of ruts. Increasing the tire pressure just a little can make the bike have less of a foot print and essentially the tires a bit “narrower” when under a load.

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I'm not a squid.. just a really fast jellyfish.

5/30/2018 7:25 PM

Rebound too fast. Or, if your running a 120 rear, switch to a 110.

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5/30/2018 10:52 PM

Weight the outside peg push your knee into the the radiator shroud keep your head and shoulders inline with the tripple clamps look where you want to go not right infront of the front wheel. Remember you must begin your turn slightly before the berm so your tire moves in to the berm.

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