Bike sales reps

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8/23/2017 1:51 PM

Hey guys I'm completing an industrial engineering technology degree. While working an internship this summer I met with many company sales reps. They said a lot of engineers and people with similar degrees become salesmens and reps for companies. It makes sense with the management, logistics, ordering, and understanding the products and technology to explain to the customers.

So to the moto point. I was at the dealer today and a guy came in with a Honda truck, a Honda ride red shirt, and a Honda backpack on, he went to talk to the financing person in the dealer. I guess he is the represtative from Honda who sells the bikes to the dealer? Anyone know how they get into these positions? This would be an awesome job. Even though my focus is mechanical design (cad modeling)

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8/23/2017 2:00 PM

I know a guy whos parents owned a dealership for honda. He was a pro racer & supercross racer when he was younger. Long story short he had the connections from racing and had a ton of experience as a higher up at the dealership.

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2009 Kawasaki KX450F
2009 Kawasaki KX250F
2002 Suzuki GSXR 600

8/23/2017 3:01 PM

I think it's important to remember that you went to school for engineering, and likely chose that for a reason. That being said, I'd recommend considering an engineering role in the industry. It would likely be easier to transition to something more customer facing at a later time. Here's the thing, if you don't take an engineering role now to start, you'll likely have a bitch of a time transitioning to engineering if you start off in a customer facing position and it turns out to be a mistake.

This happens in the tech industry all the time. Lot of software engineers transition to sales engineers. However it's not so easy going back the other direction. Think about it before you commit.

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8/23/2017 3:20 PM

I have a friend who used his CAD knowledge to design and manufacture snorkels for Jeeps. He was netting $600K a year.

Why would you want to be a wage slave salesman????

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8/23/2017 3:26 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/23/2017 3:27 PM

Passion (lust) sells bikes.
Technology makes eyes roll back in heads.

Use your degree to fill your wallet then buy all the cooters you want.

edit ... scooters

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8/23/2017 3:30 PM

With the way sales are going, I would think the last job you would want in this industry would be a sales rep...

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www.bettercallsaul.com
Die Antwoord

8/23/2017 3:30 PM

KMC440 wrote:

Passion (lust) sells bikes.
Technology makes eyes roll back in heads.

Use your degree to fill your wallet then buy all the cooters you want.

edit ... scooters

This.

Those District managers make a small salary plus bonuses. Don't get me wrong, the bonuses can be significant if you absolutely rock, but many times you are at the whim of the market and not necessarily your own job performance.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/23/2017 3:48 PM

KMC440 wrote:

Passion (lust) sells bikes.
Technology makes eyes roll back in heads.

Use your degree to fill your wallet then buy all the cooters you want.

edit ... scooters

It works both ways laughing

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2017 RMZ450
2005 YZ250-sold :,(
1998 YZ250
2005 KX250F

80% of the time it works every time
IG @hamdaddyof2 & @2HRacing
Thanks to : Factory Effex, N2Dirt, Acerbis, DT1, Fasthouse, Matix, FMF, ASV, 100% & Mika Metals

8/23/2017 3:54 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/23/2017 3:56 PM

KMC440 wrote:

Passion (lust) sells bikes.
Technology makes eyes roll back in heads.

Use your degree to fill your wallet then buy all the cooters you want.

edit ... scooters

Once your wallet is full you no longer have to buy cooters.

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8/23/2017 4:05 PM

You can find jobs in the actions sports industry on https://www.malakye.com

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8/23/2017 4:06 PM

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8/23/2017 4:06 PM

OP...

As others have said, put your degree/skills to good use, earn $$$. Sales? Meh. Get a solid salary base going with your education as your weapon.





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8/23/2017 5:20 PM

Rockinar wrote:

I have a friend who used his CAD knowledge to design and manufacture snorkels for Jeeps. He was netting $600K a year.

Why would you want to be a wage slave salesman????

$600k? That seems real high. I know engineers designing jet engine components that are in the 70-90k range

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8/23/2017 5:55 PM

JohnMatrix wrote:

I think it's important to remember that you went to school for engineering, and likely chose that for a reason. That being said, I'd recommend considering an engineering role in the industry. It would likely be easier to transition to something more customer facing at a later time. Here's the thing, if you don't take an engineering role now to start, you'll likely have a bitch of a time transitioning to engineering if you start off in a customer facing position and it turns out to be a mistake.

This happens in the tech industry all the time. Lot of software engineers transition to sales engineers. However it's not so easy going back the other direction. Think about it before you commit.

Good point. Most of the reps I met had been in their field for a while before moving to sales.

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8/23/2017 8:41 PM

What university do you attend? It seems odd to have an enphasis in mechanical design with an industrial engineering degree. I attend WVU and most industrial engineers here go on to leadership roles in some pretty reputable companies. Being a salesman or even regional sales manager seems like a waste of your potential. I personally chose Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Two Degrees), with hopes to do something in the MX industry after school.

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8/23/2017 9:22 PM

I'm studying mechanical engineering (doing FSAE on the side) and work at a dealership and I will say straight up that engineering is far more interesting then sales. It's funny how work perks can easily make a job look good. But at the end of the day I would love a Monadelphous, Chevron, BHP uniform then a Honda sales one. You can always earn the $$$, partially retire and go into part time sales later on.

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8/23/2017 10:42 PM

Take it from someone whom has worked about as deep into the industry as one can...

You are getting sold on the dream, not the reality.

Line your pockets in a lucrative field in order to pursue your passion in your free time....I promise you, if I could go back, I would.

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shit'll buff out

8/23/2017 11:08 PM

I will tell you this......as someone who did this for a living for a number of years, stick to what you went to school for. There is a little bit of a "your just lucky to be here" mentality. It's not a high paying gig by any means and you travel a ton. If you are young and live and breathe motorcycles it's a cool gig for a few years. The guy right above me is spot on.

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Did i do that?

8/23/2017 11:22 PM

JohnMatrix wrote:

I think it's important to remember that you went to school for engineering, and likely chose that for a reason. That being said, I'd recommend considering an engineering role in the industry. It would likely be easier to transition to something more customer facing at a later time. Here's the thing, if you don't take an engineering role now to start, you'll likely have a bitch of a time transitioning to engineering if you start off in a customer facing position and it turns out to be a mistake.

This happens in the tech industry all the time. Lot of software engineers transition to sales engineers. However it's not so easy going back the other direction. Think about it before you commit.

Read the above post 50 times, it's spot on.
Stay technical out of school for a few years and then you can decide if you want a more customer focused work.
I'm an IE in the O&G sector.

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