Any Skilled Tradesmen here I can ask some questions?

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2/9/2019 12:05 AM

I posted a thread a while back looking for life/job advice(sorry for the offtopic-ness), and I'm pretty sure that I want to go into a trade. I'm thinking about going to school for welding or for an electrician. I taught myself to stick weld when I was 15 and I really like it so I feel like that might be a good choice. Just looking to discuss some of the specifics and get advice.

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2/9/2019 12:21 AM

The company that wired the liquor stores we were building was starting electricians off at $48 an hour here in Denver and still not finding many to hire, and the ones they did get were guys green just out of school. Most all trades in Colorado are doing very well.

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Ed Johnson

2/9/2019 2:33 AM

Go to line school nothing touches that pay with a ten yard Stick without a masters or a PhD

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2/9/2019 2:53 AM

Hvac

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2/9/2019 3:14 AM

Industrial maintenance/electrician trades are a very good field to go into. Not many places in the world who don`t have a need for maintenance people. I worked my way into the power industry through my experience, but I have never had a worry about finding work with that skill set. Welding is a great skill, but by itself isn't generally that lucrative alone.

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2/9/2019 3:18 AM

If I had to narrow it down to one trade to learn, it would definitely be in an electrical or I&C field.

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2/9/2019 3:50 AM

I've been in facilities, industrial, machinery mechanic trades for 30 years. I'm currently welding and fab on top of machinery mech for a navy contract. It's a hard but good gig and pays pretty good. There is a wide variety of mech type positions always out there but also a lot of pay swings too.
If I had it to do over, I'd go electrical and stick to a good union. A 20 year 01 electrician that is industrial commercial versed can damn near write their own check. 100 plus is very.common.

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Was once there, now old, fat and tired... require much more horsepower now...

2/9/2019 4:08 AM

goinrcn44h wrote:

I've been in facilities, industrial, machinery mechanic trades for 30 years. I'm currently welding and fab on top of machinery mech for a navy contract. It's a hard but good gig and pays pretty good. There is a wide variety of mech type positions always out there but also a lot of pay swings too.
If I had it to do over, I'd go electrical and stick to a good union. A 20 year 01 electrician that is industrial commercial versed can damn near write their own check. 100 plus is very.common.

X2. I've been in the steel fab industry for 27 years as a fitter, and I wouldn't want to be a welder full time. You end up eating smoke all day long, not good for the lungs. Not to mention most weld/fab shops are crapholes unless you get in on one that does nuke spec work. Also, the pays not that great in most places. As far as industrial maintenance, several places I've worked have had maintenance personnel. Again the pay and benefits aren't great at a lot of places, and it's a nasty job at times. Best to get trained as an electrician. You can make bank, and stay fairly clean.

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2/9/2019 4:23 AM

I have been in residential carpentry for 29 years, lived all over the country, and have never once struggled to find a good paying job. I have been self employed in my current location for 18 years, it's been a good life, although my body is starting to feel the effects of the work.

Electrician is a good gig, and likely more easily employable than a welder, at least locally. If the current trends continue, there will be almost no tradespeople left, and even more underemployed/unemployed college grads. We need young people to get into the business on every level, and in every trade.

The work is tough, but rewarding, and the money is there if you keep your nose to the grindstone. Good luck!

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2/9/2019 4:43 AM

I started as an 01 electrician apprentice doing construction. Eventually got hired as an electrician with the local power company. Now I’m a hydro power plant operator with that same company. Every trade within the utility...lineman, electrician, operator, etc all make 6 figures with 0 overtime and benefits are all great. Benefits are amazing...6% matching 401k, pension, health, paid time off, etc.

My point is that there is lots of room to grow in any trade if you apply yourself. I make more than double the salary of the average college graduate and I didn’t put myself in debt while trying to learn, in fact I got paid very well while learning. Trades are an excellent way to go.

Lineman is a great gig, lots of fun. Something you should definitely look into.

This is all based off the electrical trade. I have no experience with the other trades other than working alongside them but I’m sure all of these same opportunities are available in any trade you choose. It’s all about setting goals and applying yourself.

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2/9/2019 4:46 AM

Don't listen to theses guys.

Get a job selling insurance.

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2/9/2019 4:52 AM

Electrical / Instrumentation and control. Challenging, rewarding, well paying and longevity. It won't destroy your body like some other trades.

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2/9/2019 5:05 AM

I was in the field doing natural gas work before I progressed to management, and it paid very well. If I had a choice though, I’d probably go electrical and not be in muddy holes day in and day out.

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Washed up moto and enduro weekend warrior.

2/9/2019 5:19 AM

coastlinecascot wrote:

Hvac

That’s what I do, Good money . I am turning away work every day. Also plumbing is a good one, the reason I say plumbing is because of the service work. People seam to pay when they are in need of heat,a/c,backed up or leaky plumbing.

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2/9/2019 5:31 AM

if you want to weld you could get a job working for a defense contractor and get all the AWS certs and make good money working on really cool shit

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"So you're telling me there's a chance!!"

2/9/2019 5:37 AM

Take a look at the Elevator Constructors.
The type of work performed varies and is similar to many of the previously listed.
One day you can be welding machine beams down and the next be wiring a complex industrial control system.
It consistently rates as one of the number one “blue collar” trades.
There is a comprehensive 4 year apprenticeship program.
The pay and benefits are second to none.

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2/9/2019 5:37 AM

OP good on ya for being smart enough to ask for advice.

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2/9/2019 5:46 AM

Whatever you do don’t go to UTi and become a mechanic. I’ve been wrenching for 20 years. I’m looking to get out of it but I don’t know how to do anything else. I wasted my G.I. bill money on school got a worthless college degree. Was a 91B light wheel vehicle mechanic. The guys who said electrical and union or plumbers union would be the best bet. Texas is a right to work state so that sucks. And stay away from Houston I mean Mexico City

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2/9/2019 5:48 AM

bdoza10 wrote:

Go to line school nothing touches that pay with a ten yard Stick without a masters or a PhD

Electrician sounds like the way to go. No 250k of student debt to haul around for 20 years. Start your own business down the road abit then start buying rentals. Fancy suit guy still paying off his loan while you got a few guys working for you. Take Wednesday afternoons off and hit the track while making money at the same time.

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2/9/2019 5:59 AM

How is moto-related? Asking for a friend.

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2/9/2019 6:03 AM

I'm a Journeyman electrician, Journeyman signalman and certified welder. I would say no to welding full time. It's just not good to breath in that crap all day every day. Awesome side gig/hobby though.
I went to work for a major railroad as a signalman. My job consists of installing and maintaining the railroad electrical devices and mechanical devices along a specific portion of railroad.. It can get very complex sometimes. It's a union gig and pay is great along with outstanding retirement. It's a very good job.
BUT...
Being on call can be a real drag sometimes if you get into a maintenance job. I recommend if you have a family and want to stay a family to stay away from being on call. You WILL miss out on lots of important family time when that phone rings unexpectedly. If you don't have a wife and kids then maybe it's not that big of a deal. Something to think about though.


Now,
If I were to do it again (which I might) I think I may become a teacher. Lower pay but the schedule is great, you get to help those that want to learn and pretty much do your own thing. Plus who doesn't want to be off work paid a few months a year in the summer?? And you probably won't wear out your body doing it.

Good luck on your journey and do something your passionate about.!

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2/9/2019 6:05 AM

dickjackson170 wrote:

How is moto-related? Asking for a friend.

Personally I don't mind this thread staying in moto related so it gets lots of exposure. Besides it is moto related in that if this guy can make good money he will go spend it on moto related purchases smile

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2/9/2019 6:09 AM

if you love motorcycles be a motorcycle mechanic, if you want to
make a lot of money don't be a motorcycle mechanic

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2/9/2019 6:22 AM

dickjackson170 wrote:

How is moto-related? Asking for a friend.

Dont be a dick

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2/9/2019 6:27 AM

JWACK wrote:

I'm a Journeyman electrician, Journeyman signalman and certified welder. I would say no to welding full time. It's just not good to breath in that crap all day every day. Awesome side gig/hobby though.
I went to work for a major railroad as a signalman. My job consists of installing and maintaining the railroad electrical devices and mechanical devices along a specific portion of railroad.. It can get very complex sometimes. It's a union gig and pay is great along with outstanding retirement. It's a very good job.
BUT...
Being on call can be a real drag sometimes if you get into a maintenance job. I recommend if you have a family and want to stay a family to stay away from being on call. You WILL miss out on lots of important family time when that phone rings unexpectedly. If you don't have a wife and kids then maybe it's not that big of a deal. Something to think about though.


Now,
If I were to do it again (which I might) I think I may become a teacher. Lower pay but the schedule is great, you get to help those that want to learn and pretty much do your own thing. Plus who doesn't want to be off work paid a few months a year in the summer?? And you probably won't wear out your body doing it.

Good luck on your journey and do something your passionate about.!

This is the path I lucked into...

Went to trade school out of high school to become an automotive technician. Worked for a dealer for over ten years, made a ton of money and had a great time doing it. It is hard work, hard on your body, and working flat rate is a tough mental game.

As I got older I wanted something more steady, more forgiving on my body. Moved from the dealer to the state police, spent a year building Troop cars and speaciatily vehicles (it was awesome). Obviously a pay cut, but benefits went way up compared to the dealer.

Got a call from a friend about a automotive teacher position at the local career & technical school. I applied because we had just had my son, and really felt like that was the best move for my family. Again, money was similar to the police gig (half of what I was making at dealer) but the benefits and time off are crazy. Plenty of time to spend with my family, don’t have to worry about sitters over school breaks or summer.

Teaching is the hardest job I’ve ever done. Mentally exhausting, admin always wanting more, kids being a pain, papaerwork, grades, etc. BUT making connections with these kids, getting them through high school, having them come back a few years later to visit when they are working have money and a brand new car, that’s the coolest feeling in the world.

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2/9/2019 6:29 AM

Been in instrumentation and controls/controls and automation in the oil and gas/petrochemical manufacturing field for 28 years. It has provided me a good life and is what I consider the best trade of all industrial trades. Very rewarding, clean, small tools, includes a little low voltage electrical, electronics, pneumatics, hydraulics, analytics, mechanical and various technologies of sensors for pressure, temperature, flow, level, ph, conductivity etc. etc. Programmable Logic Controllers and Continious Emmissions Monitoring Sustems and other regulatory devices.

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2/9/2019 6:48 AM

I also went to a 2 year trade school and received my associate's degree in industrial instrumentation and electrical. I worked in various new construction jobs right out of school until i found a maintenance position in a refinery. In south Louisiana there are numerous refinery's and chemical plants. I started the transition into the maintenance side and throughout the years and more training became a millwright and have been fortunate to work for one of the country's largest oil and natural gas exploration companys. There are always kids coming out of school with I&E degree's but very few with any millwright aspirations. Comfortable salary (six figures) and great benefits.

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2/9/2019 6:53 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/9/2019 6:59 AM

I'm in the electrical field as well, and there are so many different ways you can make a living based off of this trade based on your skill level. Low voltage work, meaning data, telco, alarms, etc, are a great way to learn the very basics , Residential wiring is simple, but it alone is economy based ( at least around these parts ), meaning how many new homes are being built/remodeled. Your real money is made in the commercial/industrial level, or doing high line for a service provider. Another great paying gig is traveling work, Wal Mart remodels for example. Its been my experience that if you are willing to stay on the road for a good bit, taking small breaks in between gigs, you can literally write your own check. Another plus to this is that a good contractor usually pays a healthy per diem while your out. Many times, that alone can easily take care of you throughout your work week, and you never have to touch your actual weeks paycheck. I traveled with a contractor doing Wal Mart work, in ten week intervals. 10 on, 3 off, getting 500 cash a week per diem, along with a very nice weekly pay, and benefits. They took care of lodging, always a private room with a full kitchen (Marriot, Candlewood Suites, etc...), so basically I had 2000 a month to pay for meals and fun money . If you are single, its a great way to make some good coin, see various parts of the country, and make good long standing work connections. If you're a family man, it is tough being gone so much, but can work as well. I've no regrets choosing electrical, and pat you on the back for asking advice. Whatever you choose, you'll get out what you put in. Choose what you think will keep you enthused,and always be keep an open mind on willing to learn any new trick of your craft. But most importantly, whatever you choose, be safe. Trades work can be very rewarding, but also very dangerous. Pay attention, be willing to ask for help no matter how big or small the task is, and remember your safety starts with you. Good luck, be safe young man! God bless

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2/9/2019 6:56 AM

brocster wrote:

Been in instrumentation and controls/controls and automation in the oil and gas/petrochemical manufacturing field for 28 years. It has provided me a good life and is what I consider the best trade of all industrial trades. Very rewarding, clean, small tools, includes a little low voltage electrical, electronics, pneumatics, hydraulics, analytics, mechanical and various technologies of sensors for pressure, temperature, flow, level, ph, conductivity etc. etc. Programmable Logic Controllers and Continious Emmissions Monitoring Sustems and other regulatory devices.

Hammond's getting a complete reboot, new management, layout, facility's, kids track. Looks good so far. Nothing compared to the stuff you cali bro is now accustomed to but good news for us Cajuns.

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2/9/2019 6:59 AM

UGOTBIT wrote:

This is the path I lucked into...

Went to trade school out of high school to become an automotive technician. Worked for a dealer for over ten years, made a ton of money and had a great time doing it. It is hard work, hard on your body, and working flat rate is a tough mental game.

As I got older I wanted something more steady, more forgiving on my body. Moved from the dealer to the state police, spent a year building Troop cars and speaciatily vehicles (it was awesome). Obviously a pay cut, but benefits went way up compared to the dealer.

Got a call from a friend about a automotive teacher position at the local career & technical school. I applied because we had just had my son, and really felt like that was the best move for my family. Again, money was similar to the police gig (half of what I was making at dealer) but the benefits and time off are crazy. Plenty of time to spend with my family, don’t have to worry about sitters over school breaks or summer.

Teaching is the hardest job I’ve ever done. Mentally exhausting, admin always wanting more, kids being a pain, papaerwork, grades, etc. BUT making connections with these kids, getting them through high school, having them come back a few years later to visit when they are working have money and a brand new car, that’s the coolest feeling in the world.

Awesome! Im looking into my alternative teaching licensure so I can become some sort of tech/shop teacher. My kids are 5&3 so if I jump ship now we will have plenty of summer adventures in the future!

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