Anderson already in salt lake

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4/28/2018 4:41 AM
Edited Date/Time: 4/28/2018 4:48 AM

Anderson’s Instagram story implies that he is already in salt lake. Maybe the altitude doesn’t cause an issue at the 4K foot stadium in Utah as opposed to Colorado..or he wasn’t there for press day but posted some things to make it look like he was.


Hope he wraps up the title today. Jason deserves it. Great guy to boot.

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4/28/2018 6:28 AM

Ya I don’t think the altitude effects him nearly as bad as thunder valley he got a 250 win in slc back in 2013

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4/28/2018 6:42 AM
Edited Date/Time: 4/28/2018 6:43 AM

Rio Rancho NM is 5280' elevation. Jason rode at our track in Raton back when he was on super minis and 125's- elevation there is 6680'. Moriarty NM is 6200'. Morrison CO is 5700'.

So does altitude sickness get worse with age? Or was he taking medicine back then? Or what?

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2019 KTM 150 SX
2019 Husqvarna TX300
2021 Honda CB500X

4/28/2018 9:06 AM

Well, I blame all these JA21 threads...
Boarded a flt for SLC.
Got my coffee...
Let’s go see some racing!
Photo

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Nobody ever told me, I found out for myself. You've got to believe in foolish miracles. It's not how you play the game, it's if you win or lose. You can choose. Don't confuse. Win or lose. It's up to you!

4/28/2018 9:51 AM

TeamGreen wrote:

Well, I blame all these JA21 threads...
Boarded a flt for SLC.
Got my coffee...
Let’s go see some racing!
Photo

JA better be careful. SLC has some pretty strong coffee. WADA might not like too much caffeine in his system.

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4/28/2018 10:37 AM

observeroffacts wrote:

Anderson’s Instagram story implies that he is already in salt lake. Maybe the altitude doesn’t cause an issue at the 4K foot ...more

I might be missing something because I don't use instatwit, but it seems like you are surprised that he's there as early as Saturday morning? I understand using "already" if you are referring to Wednesday. The earlier he gets to a higher elevation area, the less the negative effects should be for the actual race.

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4/28/2018 10:50 AM

Day race might factor in on timing of his travel.

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4/28/2018 12:00 PM

TeamGreen wrote:

Well, I blame all these JA21 threads...
Boarded a flt for SLC.
Got my coffee...
Let’s go see some racing!
Photo

Put your pants back on Manny !

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4/28/2018 1:39 PM

Judging by his qualifying times he is taking it easy and saving himself for the heat and main.

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4/29/2018 5:08 AM

Unless Jason arrived a week before he would have no benefit acclimatising.

All science on altitude training and acclimation shows that after you arrive at altitude, your performance starts to drop after the first 6-12 hours. It keeps dropping and reaches rock bottom at 72 hours.

After that it improves rapidly. This is because of a diuretic effect of altitude.

If you ever have experienced this, you may have noticed that you were peeing a lot the first 2 days. After a few days your blood volume shrinks to the point where it cannot sustain the requirements of your cardiovascular system at peak exercise and so when you go hard your brain is deprived of oxygen, you fell breathless, your heart rate won’t increase and you just can’t go.

This is your brain refusing to let you go hard. In fact, at the top of everest, you cannot get your blood lactate above 1.5mmol/l. When doing a max test at sea level it hits 16mmol/l. So you don’t go into oxygen debt and anaerobic at altitude, rather your brain just shuts down leg control and stops the power.

So if Jason happen to arrive 3 days before, or anyone for that matter, they managed to start the race at the worst possible time.

After 3 days your liver starts to produce lots of protein and your blood volume expands again. You also produce lots of red blood cells. After 5 days at altitude your performance will return to when you first arrived and will then improve.

So we therefore recommend that you either arrive the day of the race or the evening before or stay for at least a week before the race.

When it comes to actual altitude training, when you drop to lower altitude after a period of altitude training, typically 2.5 weeks, the protein is lost again but the red blood cells stick around for about 120 days.

So as a result your haematocrit goes up and you can sometimes benefit from this with improved performance.

However, the low intensity that you have to sustain at altitude means that you can often lose form if you stay too long or if you do this a few weeks before a big race or event.

This is why most of the studies on altitude training show no benefit to performance at sea level. However, that said, the best time for altitude training is 6-8 weeks before a big event.

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4/29/2018 12:05 PM

colonel wrote:

Unless Jason arrived a week before he would have no benefit acclimatising.

All science on altitude training and acclimation ...more

This study shows an “immediate” loss of 12% of performance, with that number reduced by half after 45 hours of acclimatization. It would suggest that 72 hours should result in an even better improvement, even if it isn’t directly linear. And also that while a longer acclimation period may be better, 2 days is significantly better than a few short hours.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16874590/

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4/30/2018 1:04 AM

APLMAN99 wrote:

This study shows an “immediate” loss of 12% of performance, with that number reduced by half after 45 hours of ...more

That study is 12yrs old. there is a newer up to date info.

Good study but very old.

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4/30/2018 5:27 AM

colonel wrote:

That study is 12yrs old. there is a newer up to date info.

Good study but very old.

It’s the most recent study cited in this thread........

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