AMA’s CBD Competition Bulletin

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2/15/2019 2:20 PM

Oh boy....
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2/15/2019 2:31 PM

Bull shit.

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2/15/2019 2:34 PM

Reed said hes running it regardless. We'll see.

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2/15/2019 2:34 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 2:35 PM

ama sure does regulate what the riders can’t do but doesn’t really care too much how promoters handle things. Pretty good representation.

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GP740
Since 1987

2/15/2019 2:38 PM

I'm far too lazy to look up which states haven't legalized CBD but it would only take one lawsuit from John Q. Public accusing Feld or the series for promoting "illegal" products...so I understand them covering their backsides. This may not be their whole reason for the new rule but sounds legit.

I bet old DC could give us an opinion since this will most likely pop up again this summer (looks like this ruling is SX specific).

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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

2/15/2019 2:39 PM

This could get good this weekend with Reed....

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2/15/2019 2:39 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 3:06 PM

plowboy wrote:

I'm far too lazy to look up which states haven't legalized CBD but it would only take one lawsuit from John Q. Public accusing Feld or the series for promoting "illegal" products...so I understand them covering their backsides. This may not be their whole reason for the new rule but sounds legit.

I bet old DC could give us an opinion since this will most likely pop up again this summer (looks like this ruling is SX specific).

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

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2/15/2019 2:41 PM

GeorgiePorgie wrote:

ama sure does regulate what the riders can’t do but doesn’t really care too much how promoters handle things. Pretty good representation.

Just thinking the same exact thing.

Advertising something that is legal under federal law - GTFO.

Promoter injuring the athletes you are paid to represent? Crickets

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Washed up moto and enduro weekend warrior.

2/15/2019 2:41 PM

They should be welcoming whatever sponsors they can right now. If (when) the economy turns down again it's going to get ugly real quick.

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10' 200 XC-w
96' XR600r

2/15/2019 2:45 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 2:47 PM

plowboy wrote:

I'm far too lazy to look up which states haven't legalized CBD but it would only take one lawsuit from John Q. Public accusing Feld or the series for promoting "illegal" products...so I understand them covering their backsides. This may not be their whole reason for the new rule but sounds legit.

I bet old DC could give us an opinion since this will most likely pop up again this summer (looks like this ruling is SX specific).

zehn wrote:

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

So an individual is completely free from prosecution for growing, using, advertising, selling, possessing CBD in all 50 states? Not just Fed's but state, county, city law enforcement.

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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

2/15/2019 2:54 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 2:56 PM

plowboy wrote:

I'm far too lazy to look up which states haven't legalized CBD but it would only take one lawsuit from John Q. Public accusing Feld or the series for promoting "illegal" products...so I understand them covering their backsides. This may not be their whole reason for the new rule but sounds legit.

I bet old DC could give us an opinion since this will most likely pop up again this summer (looks like this ruling is SX specific).

zehn wrote:

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

plowboy wrote:

So an individual is completely free from prosecution for growing, using, advertising, selling, possessing CBD in all 50 states? Not just Fed's but state, county, city law enforcement.

Here is an interesting read:

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2018/12/14/the-farm-bill-hemp-and-cbd-explainer/

One big myth that exists about the Farm Bill is that cannabidiol (CBD)—a non-intoxicating compound found in cannabis—is legalized. It is true that section 12619 of the Farm Bill removes hemp-derived products from its Schedule I status under the Controlled Substances Act, but the legislation does not legalize CBD generally. As I have noted elsewhere on this blog CBD generally remains a Schedule I substance under federal law. The Farm Bill—and an unrelated, recent action by the Department of Justice—creates exceptions to this Schedule I status in certain situations. The Farm Bill ensures that any cannabinoid—a set of chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant—that is derived from hemp will be legal, if and only if that hemp is produced in a manner consistent with the Farm Bill, associated federal regulations, association state regulations, and by a licensed grower. All other cannabinoids, produced in any other setting, remain a Schedule I substance under federal law and are thus illegal. (The one exception is pharmaceutical-grade CBD products that have been approved by FDA, which currently includes one drug: GW Pharmaceutical’s Epidiolex.)

There is one additional gray area of research moving forward. Under current law, any cannabis-based research conducted in the United States must use research-grade cannabis from the nation’s sole provider of the product: the Marijuana Program at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy’s National Center for Natural Products Research. That setup exists because of cannabis’s Schedule I status.[1] However, if hemp-derived CBD is no longer listed on the federal schedules, it will raise questions among medical and scientific researchers studying CBD products and their effects, as to whether they are required to get their products from Mississippi. This will likely require additional guidance from FDA (the Food and Drug Administration who oversees drug trials), DEA (the Drug Enforcement Administration who mandates that research-grade cannabis be sourced from Mississippi), and NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse who administers the contract to cultivate research-grade cannabis) to help ensure researchers do not inadvertently operate out of compliance.

State-legal cannabis programs are still illegal under federal law

The Farm Bill has no effect on state-legal cannabis programs. Over the past 22 years, 33 states have legalized cannabis for medical purposes, and over the past six years, 10 states have legalized cannabis for adult use. Every one of those programs is illegal under federal law, with no exceptions, and the Farm Bill does nothing to change that. That said, many in the advocacy community hope that the reforms to hemp policy under the Farm Bill serve as a first step toward broader cannabis reform. (Although I would argue that a soon-to-be-sworn-in Democratic House majority alongside a president with a record of pro-cannabis reform rhetoric is the more likely foundation for broader cannabis reform.)

Even CBD products produced by state-legal, medical, or adult-use cannabis programs are illegal products under federal law, both within states and across state lines. This legal reality is an important distinction for consumer protection. There are numerous myths about the legality of CBD products and their availability. Under the 2018 Farm Bill, there will be more broadly available, legal, CBD products; however, this does not mean that all CBD products are legal moving forward. Knowing your producer and whether they are legal and legitimate will be an important part of consumer research in a post-2018 Farm Bill world.

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2/15/2019 2:54 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 3:00 PM

zehn wrote:

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

Nope! Illegal on Federal level


https://www.texasnorml.org/cbd-oil-in-tx/

"There are many claims that CBD oil is legal in all 50 states. However, the DEA has come out and stated that marijuana and it’s extracts and concentrates are all schedule 1 drugs. The Controlled Substance Act states, “The term ‘marihuana’ means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin.” The DEA has gone on to clarify that “For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids. Although it might be theoretically possible to produce a CBD extract that contains absolutely no amounts of other cannabinoids, the DEA is not aware of any industrially-utilized methods that have achieved this result.”

This means that CBD oils are still considered a schedule 1 drug and therefore not legal for sale in Texas. While there does not currently seem to be a massive number of arrests or raids in Texas, there are reports of raids and citizens facing serious time in jail for possession of the extract oil. Proceed with caution, Texans!

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2/15/2019 2:57 PM

Huh. Alright then. It should be legal soon I would guess.

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2/15/2019 3:04 PM

zehn wrote:

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

Federally legalized?

CBD is not legal in all 50 states.

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2/15/2019 3:16 PM

Texas Built wrote:

Nope! Illegal on Federal level


https://www.texasnorml.org/cbd-oil-in-tx/

"There are many claims that CBD oil is legal in all 50 states. However, the DEA has come out and stated that marijuana and it’s extracts and concentrates are all schedule 1 drugs. The Controlled Substance Act states, “The term ‘marihuana’ means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin.” The DEA has gone on to clarify that “For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids. Although it might be theoretically possible to produce a CBD extract that contains absolutely no amounts of other cannabinoids, the DEA is not aware of any industrially-utilized methods that have achieved this result.”

This means that CBD oils are still considered a schedule 1 drug and therefore not legal for sale in Texas. While there does not currently seem to be a massive number of arrests or raids in Texas, there are reports of raids and citizens facing serious time in jail for possession of the extract oil. Proceed with caution, Texans!

Really this is a totally different topic but it's just insane to me that marijuana is a schedule 1 drug. Schedule 1 drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules as defined by the fed gov. Cocaine and Fentanyl are schedule 2. Blows my mind. Meanwhile nicotine and alcohol aren't even considered drugs although they have severely high potential for abuse, impaired judgement, and psychological or physical dependence.

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2/15/2019 3:21 PM

Why doesn’t the AMA figure out why tickel hasn’t heard anything instead of banning outside sponsors.

They are worthless.

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2/15/2019 3:26 PM

sbarrington314 wrote:

Really this is a totally different topic but it's just insane to me that marijuana is a schedule 1 drug. Schedule 1 drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules as defined by the fed gov. Cocaine and Fentanyl are schedule 2. Blows my mind. Meanwhile nicotine and alcohol aren't even considered drugs although they have severely high potential for abuse, impaired judgement, and psychological or physical dependence.

I agree it's insane that weed is a Schedule 1. But I don't control that. It is what it is. That decision was obviously made in some ancient times. And technically CBD oil is considered a Schedule 1 drug. This is why Feld is giving it the boot. Some States claiming it legal, Feds are saying its not. Now Feld is just making an executive decision to not allow it since its a giant gray area. I dont agree with it, but I understand the decision.

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2/15/2019 3:28 PM

It's their show. They can require you to hop on one leg and shout "Snarfblatt!" in order to qualify if they want.

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2/15/2019 3:32 PM

zehn wrote:

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

plowboy wrote:

So an individual is completely free from prosecution for growing, using, advertising, selling, possessing CBD in all 50 states? Not just Fed's but state, county, city law enforcement.

early wrote:

Here is an interesting read:

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/fixgov/2018/12/14/the-farm-bill-hemp-and-cbd-explainer/

One big myth that exists about the Farm Bill is that cannabidiol (CBD)—a non-intoxicating compound found in cannabis—is legalized. It is true that section 12619 of the Farm Bill removes hemp-derived products from its Schedule I status under the Controlled Substances Act, but the legislation does not legalize CBD generally. As I have noted elsewhere on this blog CBD generally remains a Schedule I substance under federal law. The Farm Bill—and an unrelated, recent action by the Department of Justice—creates exceptions to this Schedule I status in certain situations. The Farm Bill ensures that any cannabinoid—a set of chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant—that is derived from hemp will be legal, if and only if that hemp is produced in a manner consistent with the Farm Bill, associated federal regulations, association state regulations, and by a licensed grower. All other cannabinoids, produced in any other setting, remain a Schedule I substance under federal law and are thus illegal. (The one exception is pharmaceutical-grade CBD products that have been approved by FDA, which currently includes one drug: GW Pharmaceutical’s Epidiolex.)

There is one additional gray area of research moving forward. Under current law, any cannabis-based research conducted in the United States must use research-grade cannabis from the nation’s sole provider of the product: the Marijuana Program at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy’s National Center for Natural Products Research. That setup exists because of cannabis’s Schedule I status.[1] However, if hemp-derived CBD is no longer listed on the federal schedules, it will raise questions among medical and scientific researchers studying CBD products and their effects, as to whether they are required to get their products from Mississippi. This will likely require additional guidance from FDA (the Food and Drug Administration who oversees drug trials), DEA (the Drug Enforcement Administration who mandates that research-grade cannabis be sourced from Mississippi), and NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse who administers the contract to cultivate research-grade cannabis) to help ensure researchers do not inadvertently operate out of compliance.

State-legal cannabis programs are still illegal under federal law

The Farm Bill has no effect on state-legal cannabis programs. Over the past 22 years, 33 states have legalized cannabis for medical purposes, and over the past six years, 10 states have legalized cannabis for adult use. Every one of those programs is illegal under federal law, with no exceptions, and the Farm Bill does nothing to change that. That said, many in the advocacy community hope that the reforms to hemp policy under the Farm Bill serve as a first step toward broader cannabis reform. (Although I would argue that a soon-to-be-sworn-in Democratic House majority alongside a president with a record of pro-cannabis reform rhetoric is the more likely foundation for broader cannabis reform.)

Even CBD products produced by state-legal, medical, or adult-use cannabis programs are illegal products under federal law, both within states and across state lines. This legal reality is an important distinction for consumer protection. There are numerous myths about the legality of CBD products and their availability. Under the 2018 Farm Bill, there will be more broadly available, legal, CBD products; however, this does not mean that all CBD products are legal moving forward. Knowing your producer and whether they are legal and legitimate will be an important part of consumer research in a post-2018 Farm Bill world.

I have been driving by those pot fields for the past 29 years i have lived in Mississippi. Crazy. 200 acres of some of the highest grade weed in the world and its never been tampered with or broken in to. The fields are less than 50 yards from the road. Its a sight to see

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2/15/2019 3:33 PM

Did anybody see the difference from cbd derived from marijuana with a +.03 THC content vs. CBD from a hemp plant at >.03 THC content? It seems the AMA did no research.

I shared this a couple times.

https://www.wada-ama.org/en/content/what-is-prohibited/prohibited-in-competition/cannabinoids

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The older I get, the faster I was.

2/15/2019 3:38 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 3:42 PM

zehn wrote:

CBD products are federally legalized.

Welp turns out I’m wrong

Texas Built wrote:

Nope! Illegal on Federal level


https://www.texasnorml.org/cbd-oil-in-tx/

"There are many claims that CBD oil is legal in all 50 states. However, the DEA has come out and stated that marijuana and it’s extracts and concentrates are all schedule 1 drugs. The Controlled Substance Act states, “The term ‘marihuana’ means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin.” The DEA has gone on to clarify that “For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids. Although it might be theoretically possible to produce a CBD extract that contains absolutely no amounts of other cannabinoids, the DEA is not aware of any industrially-utilized methods that have achieved this result.”

This means that CBD oils are still considered a schedule 1 drug and therefore not legal for sale in Texas. While there does not currently seem to be a massive number of arrests or raids in Texas, there are reports of raids and citizens facing serious time in jail for possession of the extract oil. Proceed with caution, Texans!

sbarrington314 wrote:

Really this is a totally different topic but it's just insane to me that marijuana is a schedule 1 drug. Schedule 1 drugs are the most dangerous drugs of all the drug schedules as defined by the fed gov. Cocaine and Fentanyl are schedule 2. Blows my mind. Meanwhile nicotine and alcohol aren't even considered drugs although they have severely high potential for abuse, impaired judgement, and psychological or physical dependence.

The schedule 1 category has I think some historical roots that are quite obsolete nowadays. I saw a few documentaries on racism in the US in the 20th century and how the power in place tried to keep americano africans away from good jobs, education, voting rights and so on by "criminalizing" them as many were weed smokers and not alcohol drinkers. And of course the second reason is lobbying, the ones who pay get less troubles ... 50 years later Obama became President so the mentalities have fortunately changed. So the thc and cbd statuses are also evolving at a fast pace. I just hope it gets quick enough so the sponsorship money stays in the sport, the more the better for the riders.

Just imagine if a huge CBD company steps up and drop 1 million to become one of the series title sponsors to pay for the lime incident, that would be fun !

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2/15/2019 3:40 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/15/2019 3:43 PM

The ironic thing is all the whoring of Monster Energy drinks. How healthy do you think that stuff is compared to CBD oil? I will eat McDonald's every day of the week before I will drink one swig of that camel piss called Monster Energy. You're going to find yourself with a Monster tumor if you drink that shit.

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2/15/2019 3:45 PM

If it's legal in which ever State they race, they should be allowed to run/advertise the logo.

If it's illegal in that State, just tell them to cover it up.

To strictly not allow them to have sponsorship is straight up bullshit if you ask me.

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"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

2/15/2019 3:51 PM

lo95co380 wrote:

Reed said hes running it regardless. We'll see.

What will they do? Fine him? That’s all the nfl and nba do when an athlete does something they don’t want them to do.

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2/15/2019 3:52 PM

Whats the big deal, Tobacco sponsorship has been illegal for decades now. Tobacco products are legal in all 50 states. I don't smoke cigarettes or chew so I don't care, but it's legal. I do like a good cigar on a rare occasion though.

The fact that it is federally illegal, unregulated and a weed related business are the main reasons they cannot allow it to be promoted. It's pretty simple.

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2/15/2019 3:53 PM

Reefer madness was the worst propaganda film ever created. When will we step out of the dark ages?

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2/15/2019 3:55 PM

CBD bad. Energy drink good.

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James = #7. Malcolm = #27
7/27=0.259259259259259259259
Stewart return confirmed!

2/15/2019 3:56 PM

-MAVERICK- wrote:

If it's legal in which ever State they race, they should be allowed to run/advertise the logo.

If it's illegal in that State, just tell them to cover it up.

To strictly not allow them to have sponsorship is straight up bullshit if you ask me.

Hell yes it is Mav! And like what many said above....this kinda bullshit comes from the lobbyist of big pharma. It all boils down the very pin point thing.....

Fucking greed!

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

2/15/2019 3:58 PM

-MAVERICK- wrote:

If it's legal in which ever State they race, they should be allowed to run/advertise the logo.

If it's illegal in that State, just tell them to cover it up.

To strictly not allow them to have sponsorship is straight up bullshit if you ask me.

It’s a national broadcast, so....

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2/15/2019 3:58 PM

plowboy wrote:

I'm far too lazy to look up which states haven't legalized CBD but it would only take one lawsuit from John Q. Public accusing Feld or the series for promoting "illegal" products...so I understand them covering their backsides. This may not be their whole reason for the new rule but sounds legit.

I bet old DC could give us an opinion since this will most likely pop up again this summer (looks like this ruling is SX specific).

DC made comment in this weeks Racerhead.
Reed said he was running the stickers no matter what, but I think that only applied to last weekend in a state where CBD is legal. Gonna be interesting to see what happens this weekend.....

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