$7000 into a $2500 bike or $2500 into a $7000 bike?

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3/2/2020 2:32 PM

Interested in your guys outlook on this! Numbers are just based off of the local market here. I appreciate your guys wisdom and opinions! Thanks!

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3/2/2020 2:42 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/2/2020 2:43 PM

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3/2/2020 2:47 PM

$7,000 on a new, or $2,500 used bike + $400 on lessons. Trick parts won't help your corner speed

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3/2/2020 2:50 PM

How about neither. Last year I raced a stock unmodified 2018 YZ450F. Had zero done to it. was good enough for a top 3 at mammoth, top 6 at Vet Worlds (at least in the first moto, crashed out in second moto).

And My YZ125 I race is actually sprung for a 120lb rider (has lighter than stick springs, I weigh abour 175 curretnly) and that bike works fine.

Your time and money would be way better spent getting a solid bike and then hiring a riding coach and get as fit as possible as your time schedule allows.

And if you are not racing then just go have fun and enjoy the riding fror what it is.

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human/kind ... be both

3/2/2020 2:51 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/2/2020 2:53 PM

Depends on the $2500 bike. Dumping a bunch of money into an '09 YZ250F seems pointless. But I could see where dumping a bunch of money into a '02 KX500 basketcase might be somebody's cup of tea.

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3/2/2020 3:19 PM

You can get an amazing bike for 7k.
Don’t waste your time throwing money into a clapper unless you like wrenching more than riding.
Ive been keeping my eye out for newer 350s and for 7k I could get a nice low hour one no problem.

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3/2/2020 3:31 PM

It’s all about what you want. I am currently about 5,000 into an RM125 project and am loving it. I also have a 2017 TC250 that is my daily that I haven’t gone quite as overboard on

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3/2/2020 4:16 PM

Ryan625 wrote:

It’s all about what you want. I am currently about 5,000 into an RM125 project and am loving it. I also have a 2017 TC250 that ...more

This. I have a ‘17 YZ250F I bought new in ‘18 for a great deal, then have a couple older 125s I’ve built to wrench/ride for fun. And if you do anything at all, work on yourself-physical shape, and your suspension. I won a state championship on a stock’14 KX250F with suspension set up for me...and I would come from behind because of being in shape....so much fun. Either way you go, ride as much as you can. Dirt bikes are awesome.

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3/2/2020 4:23 PM

My favorite is the, “Man I can’t spend that much.” Buy a older $3k clapped bike fix it up, fix the stuff that breaks, then add their personal touch to it and before you know it’s more like 6k. Could bought a real nice close to new bike.

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3/2/2020 4:24 PM

I would not dump $7K into a roached out bike. I'd feel fine rehabbing a $2500 bike with a couple grand if it was mostly intact, however. (New plastic, chain & sprockets, bars & grips, top end, tires, etc. on a bike with a solid engine, cases, suspension and wheels, for instance.)

I would also not likely put much into a $7,000 bike. If I paid that much I would expect it to be in very close to race trim already, with only minor mods needed to suit my preferences. (And/or a bone stock new bike that needs nothing, per the comments above.)

If we're talking about spending the whole $9500 that you get from combining the two sums, that's a new motorcycle all day long for me.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

3/2/2020 4:47 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/3/2020 6:02 AM

I estimate I'll have $13,000 in a $2,800 bike by the time I'm done.
But thats full race engine, A-kit suspension, titanium, carbon fiber and every little odd and end you can get. And the way prices are getting you would struggle to keep it under that price if you bought new.
At the end of the day don't matter if I bought it new off the show room floor or off Craigslist Only thing left of it is the frame, subframe, engine, and a few small bits.
So it depends on how far you plan on going as to where the tipping point is for new vs used. Also the benifit of buying used is you can put that $7000 into it over time as you have the money available instead of dropping it all at once or being commited to a payment

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3/2/2020 4:47 PM

If you spend $7,000 on and old bike it will still be an old bike

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3/2/2020 4:48 PM

This is how I ended up buying a '19 150sx. For what people want for a 03/04 KX125 around here and going through it and doing everything I was better off just buying a new one.

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3/2/2020 4:55 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/2/2020 4:56 PM

Kevin852 wrote:

How about neither. Last year I raced a stock unmodified 2018 YZ450F. Had zero done to it. was good enough for a top 3 at ...more

Just started riding MX in early October late September. I'm on a 2018 RMZ 450. My main problem is arm pump. I know it's from a mixture of bad form, death grip, and breathing. I'm not in horrible shape. 6"3 185lbs.

I also have a 97 Yz125 (It's fully restored with suspension set up for 175lb rider) Im about to start riding to see if i can build better form/skill, so when I get on my 450 my arm pump wont get so bad. It's after like 3-4 laps depending on how rough a track is.

Would some lessons benefit me enough to where I would be able to ride more? I want to stay on the track and keep spinning laps but my arms wont let me...

Also figured I would say I workout pretty regularly so my arms and stuff I would not consider "weak."

Some days I ride I feel like my arm pump problem is getting better, but then the next weekend it's back to square one....

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3/2/2020 6:38 PM

Mossy wrote:

Just started riding MX in early October late September. I'm on a 2018 RMZ 450. My main problem is arm pump. I know it's from a ...more

Three things to help with arm pump.

1) Relax when riding/racing. Not always the easiest but a light grip and breathing and gripping with legs helps.

2) be in good cardiovascular shape so you get good blood flow. and your "work" harder.

3) ride as much as possible as there is no substitute for riding (although mountain bikes is as close as it gets to simulate mx).

Do as much as feasible of those three things and it will help.

Best of luck. smile

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human/kind ... be both

3/2/2020 7:17 PM

Mx286 wrote:

My favorite is the, “Man I can’t spend that much.” Buy a older $3k clapped bike fix it up, fix the stuff that breaks, then add ...more

Spoken like a true 4 stroker! (Just sayin, that’s not a bad thing) but 2 stroke guys might have a different view. Probably depends on the goal...we making a race bike? Or a play bike? And at what level? To each their own I suppose

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3/2/2020 7:22 PM

What are your goals? Are you trying to get a win in your class? Are just trying to have fun? Do you want reliability?

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3/2/2020 9:56 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/3/2020 6:52 AM

$1800 bike. Another Photo 6K later and tailored to my needs. I still payed less then if I bought a new bike. I did what I could making an old bike new.

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3/3/2020 4:51 AM

Kevin852 wrote:

How about neither. Last year I raced a stock unmodified 2018 YZ450F. Had zero done to it. was good enough for a top 3 at ...more

Mossy wrote:

Just started riding MX in early October late September. I'm on a 2018 RMZ 450. My main problem is arm pump. I know it's from a ...more

I don't know your situation, but a common thing I see with people on 450s is trying to get out there and push and wearing themselves out in a hurry. Work on putting down entire motos at what ever pace you can safely sustain. Put in the laps and you will get more comfort.

If your physical conditioning is decent, the next thing to look at on a 450 is suspension setup, specifically the forks. If you can lay down motos on your 125 and not the 450, that definitely points toward a suspension setup issue on the 450. I believe that modern 4Ts are set up relatively stiff for beginner riders, especially on typical slow / easy East coast tracks.

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3/3/2020 5:00 AM

mc795 wrote:

Interested in your guys outlook on this! Numbers are just based off of the local market here. I appreciate your guys wisdom ...more

I think you need to be somewhere in the middle of that range. The only bike that you can get for $2500 that is actually worth sinking money into as a race bike is a two stroke. But you are still going to be working with an old design, no matter how much cash you dump into it, and you probably aren't getting that cash back out when you sell it. It's an acquired taste and a niche bike, not everyone wants to race one.

I feel like $3500-4000 is a much more viable price point for finding a usable modern race bike. Make sure to do the math on what each particular model will need, read reviews to see how they perform and what mods they need, and go from there.

FWIW, I just bought a 2017.5 KTM 450 SXF FE. It has some hours on it, so I put in a new top end, rebuilt the forks, and of course other odds and ends. But the punchline is that I have an almost-current bike for less than half of what that bike cost new. It's much easier for me to convince my wife for me to buy a cheaper bike and then put money into it over time than it is to make a case for a $7K bike.

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3/3/2020 5:36 AM

Kevin852 wrote:

How about neither. Last year I raced a stock unmodified 2018 YZ450F. Had zero done to it. was good enough for a top 3 at ...more

Great story!!! His question was "$7000 into a $2500 bike or $2500 into a $7000 bike?".

How about instead of making this about you, he's asking for input on how to spend his money on his next bike purchase. This could be Ricky Carmichael for all you know and you are sitting here telling him to hire a riding coach and get in shape. How did you possibly digress this much just based on a simple question he asked???

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3/3/2020 5:46 AM

$7k you can pick up a brand new left over with 0 hours. Slap some bars or whatever you need to make it fit you and you are in business. This is what I do, swap bikes out every couple of years.

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3/3/2020 5:55 AM

Why do people modify the fuck out of these newer bikes when they’re most likely weekend warriors riding 3 lap motos?

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3/3/2020 6:01 AM

MotoMan12345 wrote:

Why do people modify the fuck out of these newer bikes when they’re most likely weekend warriors riding 3 lap motos?

Because we have disposable income that we choose to put into the moto industry because we enjoy it. If it wasn't for the 3 lap weekend warriors most tracks wouldn't make it.

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3/3/2020 6:04 AM

Neither. Being a slow c class rider i cant commit $9500 to a dirtbike. Put $2500 into a $2500 bike and putting the rest towards lessons or gear sounds better.

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3/3/2020 8:10 AM

$1000 into a $4000 bike.

suspension set up, wheels and a nice pipe grin

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3/3/2020 8:15 AM

Either way you end up with a $9,500 bike. Go buy a new one and your resale will be better. If not new, the resale on a $7,000 plus $2,500 bike should be more than the opposite. You're choice. If you've got $9,500 to spend on a bike you can pretty much get whatever you want.

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3/3/2020 8:21 AM

bonseff wrote:

$7,000 on a new, or $2,500 used bike + $400 on lessons. Trick parts won't help your corner speed

So simple but so true.

I wish when i was 15-20, I under stood that. smile

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3/3/2020 8:24 AM

Kevin852 wrote:

How about neither. Last year I raced a stock unmodified 2018 YZ450F. Had zero done to it. was good enough for a top 3 at ...more

Mossy wrote:

Just started riding MX in early October late September. I'm on a 2018 RMZ 450. My main problem is arm pump. I know it's from a ...more

mark_swart wrote:

I don't know your situation, but a common thing I see with people on 450s is trying to get out there and push and wearing ...more

I wouldn’t say I can lay down Motos on the 125 but I can definitely ride for a whole lot longer without getting worn out. It was funny too because about a month ago a guy had a 2007 yz125 and let me ride it while he was resting. I was complaining about arm pump before getting on it. Road the 125 and had 0 arm pump.

I was just like wowww wtf haha. I looked up spring rate for 2018 rmz450 and the stock spring rate seems to be good for my weight. Or does it come down to more than just spring rate?

Also I would say that’s a thing too. As soon as I get out there I wanna ride as hard as I can and end up wearing my self out very quickly silly

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3/3/2020 8:33 AM

Recently went through a similar dilemma. Ran numbers through my head like crazy and came to the conclusion in the end when it came to sell them either way I would be losing close to the same money. The numbers you’re talking you’d probably lose less on the more expensive newer option. I’d rather lose money while riding a new bike. So far like my decision just don’t like that I haven’t got to put many hours on it yet.

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