1/2 ton towable toy haulers

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8/5/2017 6:51 PM

As title states, in the market for a small bumper pull, 20 ft or smaller. Curious as to experiences some of you have had with certain brands. Looking into Dunesport, but have warned a few times to stay away. Not against converting a new cargo either, just depends on cost, versus one already finished. Post up pics if you got them, give me some tips. Tow rig is a Ford Expedition, with a 5.4 2wd.

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8/5/2017 6:55 PM

I don't own it but I nearly bought a KZ Sportster 210th a while back. Cost was in the mid-20s brand new, 25ft long, and killer interior. Looked like a great toy hauler.

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8/5/2017 8:37 PM

VRV, all the way! Absolutely love mine.

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http://www.vrvtoyhauler.com/

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8/5/2017 8:58 PM

Vrv trailer looks great!! Never seen one before. What do they go for

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8/5/2017 9:22 PM

I have a 19' Weekend Warrior SX Edition (actually more like 20.5') and am very happy with it. I bought it used and put a little money into it, but it's a perfect sized trailer. I recommend NOT getting a built in generator, unless you like the vibrations that it causes. I bought (2)- Honda EU2000 generators and I lnk the 2nd one together, when I need to run the AC. Otherwise I just run one of them and save the gas. It fits 3 bikes comfortably, but I use it mostly for my RZR.

Might be buying a Fun Mover soon and will be selling mine, but I'm in So.Cal.

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8/5/2017 10:24 PM

coastlinecascot wrote:

Vrv trailer looks great!! Never seen one before. What do they go for

Couldn't say exactly, I think most are built to order. I picked mine up a few years ago, used, for 16K Canadian. Full bathroom, medium fridge, hot water heater, queen size fold out, kitchen, propane heater, AC, all aluminum construction, 2800lbs dry.

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8/5/2017 11:17 PM

langhammx wrote:

I have a 19' Weekend Warrior SX Edition (actually more like 20.5') and am very happy with it. I bought it used and put a little money into it, but it's a perfect sized trailer. I recommend NOT getting a built in generator, unless you like the vibrations that it causes. I bought (2)- Honda EU2000 generators and I lnk the 2nd one together, when I need to run the AC. Otherwise I just run one of them and save the gas. It fits 3 bikes comfortably, but I use it mostly for my RZR.

Might be buying a Fun Mover soon and will be selling mine, but I'm in So.Cal.

I have a 35ft gearbox with built in 5500 Onan and you barley hear it running. IMO it's the only way to go. Unless you want to get up at 3AM in your undies & go out and start the Honda!

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8/5/2017 11:56 PM

langhammx wrote:

I have a 19' Weekend Warrior SX Edition (actually more like 20.5') and am very happy with it. I bought it used and put a little money into it, but it's a perfect sized trailer. I recommend NOT getting a built in generator, unless you like the vibrations that it causes. I bought (2)- Honda EU2000 generators and I lnk the 2nd one together, when I need to run the AC. Otherwise I just run one of them and save the gas. It fits 3 bikes comfortably, but I use it mostly for my RZR.

Might be buying a Fun Mover soon and will be selling mine, but I'm in So.Cal.

What are you looking to get for it? I'm in the market as well, and I'm in SoCal...

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8/6/2017 4:15 AM

Go as light and small as you can. When you start getting close to the 5000 lb mark, any 1/2 ton vehicle will feel it and struggle. I learned the hard way.

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8/6/2017 7:04 AM

langhammx wrote:

I have a 19' Weekend Warrior SX Edition (actually more like 20.5') and am very happy with it. I bought it used and put a little money into it, but it's a perfect sized trailer. I recommend NOT getting a built in generator, unless you like the vibrations that it causes. I bought (2)- Honda EU2000 generators and I lnk the 2nd one together, when I need to run the AC. Otherwise I just run one of them and save the gas. It fits 3 bikes comfortably, but I use it mostly for my RZR.

Might be buying a Fun Mover soon and will be selling mine, but I'm in So.Cal.

Something like yours is what I'm wanting, but I can't find one of those used around here for shit. Weekend Warrior doesn't make that model anymore.... The VRV model looks cool as well. All I find here are 3 axle, single-wide size, leather and granite clad units that look as though the were designed by Trump. I don't need/want anything near that......

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8/6/2017 7:09 AM

wwoberg wrote:

Go as light and small as you can. When you start getting close to the 5000 lb mark, any 1/2 ton vehicle will feel it and struggle. I learned the hard way.

Yes. Have seen a bunch of half ton owners without a truck at all from trying to pull loads around to the track all the time. Best bet is to buy at least a 3/4 ton truck, then you can buy as big of a hauler you want and travel safe without hurting your vehicle.


Buddy of mine had a new tundra that got sickly heading up to fast farms with less then 20 000 on the truck. He wasn't very happen when the roll back finally got his truck and trailer back.

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8/6/2017 7:33 AM

Almost every 1/2 tone truck will be put in a strain pulling a toy hauler. By the time you add fuel, tools, bikes, gear and etc. the weight will become too great for the 1/2 ton to do the job easy.

Paw Paw

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8/6/2017 8:20 AM

I don't know your budget, but if you are buying on a budget look at a used Carson Fun Runner or Carson Titan. They tend to be very reasonably priced and in the size and weight you are looking for. They don't have all the bells and whistles other haulers have but they will have all the necessities: AC, Frig, oven, stove, toilet, shower, microwave, etc.

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8/6/2017 8:20 AM

We had a Work and Play from Forest River, it was fantastic. It went to countless races and ride weekends, we took it places not really designed for campers and it held up for 10 years. It was no frills but was perfect for camping out at races and riding areas.

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8/6/2017 8:34 AM

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8/6/2017 8:49 AM

I have been eyeballing this one because it's short but still has the bedroom in the front.

http://www.forestriverinc.com/product-details.aspx?LineID=181&Image=5075&ModelID=3576#Main

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8/6/2017 9:29 AM

I've been doing a lot of research on toy haulers as we are buying one soon...You want one with aluminum wall framing and fiberglass exterior.

There are many half ton towable trailers out there.

We have settled on a Hyperlite XLR 27HFS- these are specific built toy haulers, not trailer trailers with wooden framing turned into a toy hauler.

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8/6/2017 10:00 AM

You guys eyeing up these units that have near 1000lbs hitch weight and 7000lbs dry weights with plans of towing them with 1/2 tons are nuts IMO.

That little 20' VRV I have is around 3000 dry and 4500 fully loaded. I could not imagine doubling that and towing any amount of distance. Sure it might be rated for it, but your brakes, suspension, engine, mpg will all suffer for the worse.

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8/6/2017 10:16 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/6/2017 10:17 AM

bodean123 wrote:

You guys eyeing up these units that have near 1000lbs hitch weight and 7000lbs dry weights with plans of towing them with 1/2 tons are nuts IMO.

That little 20' VRV I have is around 3000 dry and 4500 fully loaded. I could not imagine doubling that and towing any amount of distance. Sure it might be rated for it, but your brakes, suspension, engine, mpg will all suffer for the worse.

My Tundra has a 10k towing capacity...for example the Hyperlite we are going to buy is ~6000 dry weight- guessing 7000 loaded doesn't worry me at all... Note- My Tundra pulls my skid steer like there is nothing back there..

Yes 7,000 is a lot of weight, but drive careful and take your time you'll be fine. Stabilizer bars help. I've pulled a trailer from WI to Alaska and back twice..one of those times 1500 miles of it was on snow covered roads. Never had a issue but a lot of it comes down to driving ability.

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8/6/2017 10:29 AM

Brad460 wrote:

My Tundra has a 10k towing capacity...for example the Hyperlite we are going to buy is ~6000 dry weight- guessing 7000 loaded doesn't worry me at all... Note- My Tundra pulls my skid steer like there is nothing back there..

Yes 7,000 is a lot of weight, but drive careful and take your time you'll be fine. Stabilizer bars help. I've pulled a trailer from WI to Alaska and back twice..one of those times 1500 miles of it was on snow covered roads. Never had a issue but a lot of it comes down to driving ability.

I had a 2010 Tundra. Loved the truck. I felt comfortable towing loads up to about ~8000-8500 lbs with it (I tow a lot in the AZ mountains). Above that, the trailer pushed the truck around quite a bit - tail wagging the dog. The power train had NO problem at all pulling heavy weight (I towed ~9500 lbs up in the AZ mountains a couple times), but braking and suspension turned the tow into a serious white knuckler. Never again. I'm an advocate for towing only up to ~80% of towing capacity now days. But that power train in the Tundra is bad ass, just the suspension and braking are the limiting factors.

That said, any half ton truck should be able to tow up to

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8/6/2017 10:53 AM

I'm aware of the Tundra's towing capacity (see pic above), that's what I'm using as well. The spec sheet for the XLR 27HFS says it closer to 6800lbs dry. It's not just the weight you need to account for when towing large trailers, it's also the added drag and how much cross winds can effect everything.

To each their own though, just from my experience, I wouldn't be comfortable towing that with 1/2 ton.

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8/6/2017 10:56 AM

There are also a lot of sites and resources to build your own out of a cargo trailer. Better built, add your own bed and whatever you want and don't pay for the stuff you don't need. I think the site I went on was called teardrops and tiny trailers or something. Thumpertalk has a few home builds that are sweet as well.

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8/6/2017 12:38 PM

Be advised, all the manufacturers lie about the weight. The dry weight of whatever pounds is before anything extra goes on it to include batteries, spare tire, awning, fuel stations, propane tanks, tongue jacks, AC, inverters and charging systems etc. What ever you get, take it to a scale and have it weighed so you know what you are dealing with. Half tons are sketchy over 5000 lbs. true trailer weight.

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The older I get, the faster I was.

8/6/2017 1:26 PM

GoldenState54 wrote:

I have been eyeballing this one because it's short but still has the bedroom in the front.

http://www.forestriverinc.com/product-details.aspx?LineID=181&Image=5075&ModelID=3576#Main

I don't see that one being towed by a 1/2 ton truck when loaded.

Paw Paw

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8/6/2017 1:34 PM

I agree with Paw paw. We used to have a 2003 Expedition with the 5.4 engine. No way I would tow a 27', 6700 lbs dry weight, +9000 lbs full weight, +900 lbs tongue weight trailer with that vehicle. That would be super sketchy.

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8/6/2017 2:02 PM

Just remember that ultra lite means ultra flimsy , especially a toy hauler that will see dirt road and such ,they twist and flex ,cabinets won't stat closed ,mirrors fall of the wall etc.

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8/6/2017 2:07 PM

bodean123 wrote:

You guys eyeing up these units that have near 1000lbs hitch weight and 7000lbs dry weights with plans of towing them with 1/2 tons are nuts IMO.

That little 20' VRV I have is around 3000 dry and 4500 fully loaded. I could not imagine doubling that and towing any amount of distance. Sure it might be rated for it, but your brakes, suspension, engine, mpg will all suffer for the worse.

Brad460 wrote:

My Tundra has a 10k towing capacity...for example the Hyperlite we are going to buy is ~6000 dry weight- guessing 7000 loaded doesn't worry me at all... Note- My Tundra pulls my skid steer like there is nothing back there..

Yes 7,000 is a lot of weight, but drive careful and take your time you'll be fine. Stabilizer bars help. I've pulled a trailer from WI to Alaska and back twice..one of those times 1500 miles of it was on snow covered roads. Never had a issue but a lot of it comes down to driving ability.

TbonesPop wrote:

I had a 2010 Tundra. Loved the truck. I felt comfortable towing loads up to about ~8000-8500 lbs with it (I tow a lot in the AZ mountains). Above that, the trailer pushed the truck around quite a bit - tail wagging the dog. The power train had NO problem at all pulling heavy weight (I towed ~9500 lbs up in the AZ mountains a couple times), but braking and suspension turned the tow into a serious white knuckler. Never again. I'm an advocate for towing only up to ~80% of towing capacity now days. But that power train in the Tundra is bad ass, just the suspension and braking are the limiting factors.

That said, any half ton truck should be able to tow up to

Power train is rarely the weak link, the weak link is always the suspension.

I've pulled 10K with my 1997 V6 explorer. Engine/transmission didn't mind nearly as much as the squishy shocks.

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8/6/2017 2:10 PM

Biggest problem with your tow rig is the small wheelbase. Its a 1500 frame technically but in all reality its about 18" shorter WB than a f150. My 2 cents we towed a 33ft forest river XLR that was 7500k dry about 9500k loaded with a 2012, 2014 and 2016 silverado with the 5.3 and all they did great. We would not top 65 mph unless it was to pass and overall trips in Michigan we would get around 9mpg.

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8/6/2017 2:49 PM

Not sure what year your Expedition is but just going off a quick google search, as far back as 2008 they had a tow rating of 9000lbs. Towing a trailer with a GVW of 6-7k pounds should be plenty safe and allows you many smaller toy hauler options to choose from... Get a good trailer brake setup, make sure your truck's brakes and suspension are in tip top shape, and you're good to go. You can also add air bags in the rear suspension. People in here are really down playing half ton towing capability so don't let them scare you into thinking you have no options and need a bigger truck.

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8/6/2017 2:57 PM

colintrax wrote:

Power train is rarely the weak link, the weak link is always the suspension.

I've pulled 10K with my 1997 V6 explorer. Engine/transmission didn't mind nearly as much as the squishy shocks.

Agree 100% and I'll reiterate braking as another possible weak link. Even with trailer brakes, your vehicle brakes can get super hot going down long hills, warp, and give a lot of steering wheel wobble. That plus a squishy suspension is no fun when towing.

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