HELPPPP!!! 96 Pile Of Parts

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4/16/2020 1:08 PM

So let me start off with this... I have zero experience with dirt bike repair and dont know where to start. I inherited this pile of parts that was half way torn down before the previous owner croaked. I said I'd take it and would like to restore it to a working bike and had a patriotic theme in mind hence the blue frame, its patriot blue. Now I know I might get some crap because I'm a newbie and painting a honda blue but whatever. Just wondering because of the popularity of this year is it possible for a newbie to really get it in order or am I better off just selling the damn thing and getting another one? The bottom end is taken apart block is partially open but it looks like they didn't have a puller to get it all the way apart. the piston was grenaded so I have sent and recieved the top end back from US CHROME so thats all brand new back to factory spec. Only thing thats missing that i know of is ill need a new piston and head that goes on top of the top end. From the videos I've seen this bike really rips and I think it would be awesome to ride, let me know Photo
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4/16/2020 3:42 PM

Sounds like you are at a crossroads..... do you want to dig in, finish what you started and be a respected member of your community? Or do you want to sell it, part it out and forever wonder what it would have been like to accept the challenge you were presented..... and yes, the frame needs to be Shasta white.

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4/16/2020 4:32 PM

throw down the gauntlet my man!
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4/16/2020 9:33 PM

I’d start with purchasing a manual. Clean all the parts and inspect the frame and cases for cracks. Take your time. Rebuild it. Everyone starts off not knowing how to work on bikes. Either as kids or adults we all start somewhere.
When your done you can be proud of your accomplishments.

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4/16/2020 9:52 PM

Get rid of it!! I’ll buy it for $200 cuz I’ll have to repaint and buy a piston😂😂😂😏😏

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4/17/2020 12:18 AM
Edited Date/Time: 4/17/2020 12:21 AM

Having restored a 95 specifically and on my second (92) and hoping to add a 5th (96) in a next few days I can say it’s hugely satisfying to do a restore.
But I’m old and I’m fortunate to have several other bikes I can ride while I’m doing this work. Back in my 20’s there would be no way I could do a quality job. More so without a running bike.

I say sell it or better yet part it out and use that money to buy a running bike.

You are super fortunate to have a bike that is crazy popular for guys like me to restore. I would consider buying a motor complete with no broken case for $400-$500. Even in parts. An airbox is worth $100-$200 depending on condition.

Just take a look on eBay what parts are going for.

I have quite a bit of experience along with confidence to learn what I do not know about these bikes. Plus I have tools and money to throw at these. Building it yourself may simply lead to numerous unanticipated additional costs as you under estimate issues or trouble areas.

Back in the day I tried what you are thinking. We didn’t have YouTube. I’m fortunate I still had others around me who convinced me not to attempt a basket case for my first bike. So I returned it and bought a CL70 without my parents knowledge. While loading it into a van by riding it up into it of course, I caught the top edge of the door frame with my bare skull. Knocking me off the bike which was good since I had been WFO while loading it in first gear. Skull lacerated and an immediate trip to emergency. And yes my parents found out.


But I kept the bike........F yeah!!

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4/17/2020 5:30 AM

Go to Facebook and join the CR250 Steel Frames Only group. At the top there is a link for a service manual. That is assuming this is a 250. 1996 is a desirable year. I just restored a 1995 CR250. I have a thread here in the forum for the whole process. It was only my second bike I have ever done. The bike would be much easier to sell if it had a white frame. Look at the manual and read up on here to see if you want to retire it. It is worth it. You have Showa decals on the forks. 1996 had Kayaba forks. Are you sure it is a 1996? 1992-1994 had Showa forks.

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4/17/2020 11:22 AM

Brian_Bowles wrote:

Go to Facebook and join the CR250 Steel Frames Only group. At the top there is a link for a service manual. That is assuming this is a 250. 1996 is a desirable year. I just restored a 1995 CR250. I have a thread here in the forum for the whole process. It was only my second bike I have ever done. The bike would be much easier to sell if it had a white frame. Look at the manual and read up on here to see if you want to retire it. It is worth it. You have Showa decals on the forks. 1996 had Kayaba forks. Are you sure it is a 1996? 1992-1994 had Showa forks.

The Frame says its a 96 but I'm not even sure if its a Frankenstein bike because I don't know parts to certain years.

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4/17/2020 11:24 AM

Brian_Bowles wrote:

Go to Facebook and join the CR250 Steel Frames Only group. At the top there is a link for a service manual. That is assuming this is a 250. 1996 is a desirable year. I just restored a 1995 CR250. I have a thread here in the forum for the whole process. It was only my second bike I have ever done. The bike would be much easier to sell if it had a white frame. Look at the manual and read up on here to see if you want to retire it. It is worth it. You have Showa decals on the forks. 1996 had Kayaba forks. Are you sure it is a 1996? 1992-1994 had Showa forks.

All the pictures I see on google for the 96 still show Showa Forks...

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4/17/2020 11:39 AM

Good luck and I mean that sincerely. Starting with a basketcase is going to be harder than a fully assembled bike that needs work. If you don't care how long it takes you then go for it, but I would not expect to be riding this bike right away.

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4/17/2020 9:57 PM

Brian_Bowles wrote:

Go to Facebook and join the CR250 Steel Frames Only group. At the top there is a link for a service manual. That is assuming this is a 250. 1996 is a desirable year. I just restored a 1995 CR250. I have a thread here in the forum for the whole process. It was only my second bike I have ever done. The bike would be much easier to sell if it had a white frame. Look at the manual and read up on here to see if you want to retire it. It is worth it. You have Showa decals on the forks. 1996 had Kayaba forks. Are you sure it is a 1996? 1992-1994 had Showa forks.

ConQuest Josh wrote:

All the pictures I see on google for the 96 still show Showa Forks...

If you go to Partzilla and look up the 1996 CR250 it says Kayaba forks. Also read this article. 1996 CD250

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4/17/2020 11:29 PM

The factory bikes had showa forks but stock had Kayaba and yours is kayaba aswell. You can tell from the two piece outer fork tubes.

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4/18/2020 10:57 AM

The 92-96 CR250 is one of the most desirable dirt bikes ever made.

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2000 Kawasaki KDX220
1996 Kawasaki KDX200
1997 Honda CR500