Schier Concepts Schier Clamps

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Schier Concepts Schier Clamps  092316scheir1
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Specifications

Product Schier Concepts Schier Clamps
Type
Features
Miscellaneous We often use GoPro cameras for capturing helmet-mounted action video, but we also very frequently move them from helmet-to-helmet. Depending on the design, they might be mounted more towards the front, like the Just 1 or Arai, which are best right behind the visor; or the Fly and TLD SE4, which are good on top; or the Bell Moto 9, which has a nice flat spot towards the rear. Needless to say, they all require varying angles to get pointed in the right direction, and using the stock fastener can be tough, since it's either too tight to loosen, or you can't get it tight enough to keep it from moving. Either way, you pretty much have to carry a screwdriver with you to make adjustments. That is, until now.



Dan Schiermeyer's a manufacturing engineer who also loves to skydive. His brother, Ben, is Justin Barcia's mechanic. Dan developed a cool quick-release that's easy to use, but can still generate plenty of force to keep the camera's mount clamped down snugly, right across the front of the mount. On older style stock mounts (with the little acorn nut), you just push it out, install the Schier clamp, and use the included thumb screw to snug it up. There are some newer style GoPro mounts have a molded-in nut, but you can use a punch (with a socket underneath) to knock it out.



Oh, and we'll admit it, when we first installed the Schier Clamp, we didn't peek at the instructions, and did it like a bicycle seatpost QR, pointing towards the rear of the helmet. It's way cleaner the way Dan designed it.



They're $19.95, are available in seven anodized colors, and can be ordered through www.schierconcepts.com.



As a tip to get your camera pointed correctly, we usually look at the helmet from the side, figure out the angle that the rider will be looking, and aim about 15 degrees above that. We often hear comments that it might be aimed too high, but they generally come out just right. Besides, we're rather have it a touch high, than have a sore neck at the end of the video from trying to peek up under the top edge of the frame.
Price $19.95
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