Dragon NFX2 Goggles

Vital Rating: (Very Good)
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    Tested: Dragon NFX2 Goggles

    Rating: Vital Review

    I’ve always been pretty particular about which goggles I use, ever since I first saw McGrath rockin’ his rad signature series back in the day. Since then, I’ve had experience riding with everything from the old affordable Spy Targas, to some of the high-end Transformer-looking setups from the likes of Scott, Oakley, and 100%. When it comes to goggles, their price and quality definitely seem to go hand in hand. While my $30 basic Targas got the job done, it’s the small details that really set the high-end goggle apart. In this case, the Dragon NFX2’s are a great example of a company looking to produce the best product they can Read More »

    I’ve always been pretty particular about which goggles I use, ever since I first saw McGrath rockin’ his rad signature series back in the day. Since then, I’ve had experience riding with everything from the old affordable Spy Targas, to some of the high-end Transformer-looking setups from the likes of Scott, Oakley, and 100%. When it comes to goggles, their price and quality definitely seem to go hand in hand. While my $30 basic Targas got the job done, it’s the small details that really set the high-end goggle apart. In this case, the Dragon NFX2’s are a great example of a company looking to produce the best product they can by packing it full of details to try and rise above the pack. The NFX2 seems to take a lot from their snow goggles and without further ado, let’s see how they handle the dirt.

    Photo Credit: Chelsea Curtis

    Dragon NFX2 Goggle Overview:

    • Swiftlock lens change system.
    • Includes ten pack of tear-offs and one lens shield.
    • Injection-molded, dual all-weather anti-fog treated lens.
    • Removable noseguard.
    • MSRP: $170

    First Impressions

    The first thing I noticed when I got these goggles was just how rad they looked. I haven’t seen many full-frame goggles like these before, so I took a couple minutes to look over the design and see how they felt pressed up against my face. The seal fits well, though when I first put the goggles on, they did pinch my nose a bit. There was plenty of room for the goggle to break in against your face as the foam was thick, so this did go away after a few rides. I also appreciated that the plush foam offers plenty of ventilation between the frame and your face.

    Photo Credit: Chelsea Curtis

    In my opinion, the coolest feature on these goggles is the lens quick-release feature. In the past, changing goggle lenses has been the most annoying task but with the quick-release setup that Dragon has...well, it makes it possible within seconds. Of course there are many different stylings and models of MX goggles that Dragon offers, meaning there’s definitely a style and color for everyone. The NFX2 is Dragon's top of the line goggle, and this is reflected in the lofty price for their premium model. Given the rad look, quick-release feature, and hefty price tag, I was interested in seeing how these stacked up on the track!

    On the Track

    I feel like the better the goggles are made, the less things should stand out to you when you’re riding with them. So the best compliment I can give the NFX2s, is they do a great job of being virtually unnoticeable while riding. The venting is on par, as I didn’t find myself having to worry about drops of sweat messing up my vision. But there was one thing that was very noticeable, and that was the wide peripheral view! The field of view on the Dragons, compared to my other goggles, is much improved. This is quite noticeable when going through switchback sections, as you look ahead to the next corner out of the corner of the lens, as well as when someone is coming up on your inside or outside to pass...which happens a lot to me.

    Photo Credit: Chelsea Curtis

    The goggles didn’t give me any issues with fogging up or inhibiting my vision as some of the other brands I’ve used before. To test out the anti-fogging abilities, I did take these moto goggles snowboarding. While they did end up fogging when it finally got down to 12 degrees, this didn’t translate into any issues on the MX track in the normal riding conditions between 40-80 degrees. One of the only physical things I didn’t care for was the noseguard. I rode with on for half the first day and then removed it, riding without it for the rest of my outings. The nose area pressure decreased after the first few rides and then I felt completely comfortable wearing the NFX2s. I think it’s great that they have the option for the noseguard for those that prefer them. And for those of us who don’t, we can simply pop them right off.

    Photo Credit: Chelsea Curtis

    Long-Term Durability

    I have about two months worth of riding in these now, and aside from a couple of noticeable knicks in the lens (from times I didn’t use tear offs), the rest of the goggles are as good as new. Honestly, I haven’t done anything aside from tossing them back in the goggle bag after riding. While the mirrored lens look amazing, I'm a bit wary for the day when I have to replace them since they’re $55 apiece. It seems that as long as I take good care of them and run tear offs more times than not, I should be fine for the foreseeable future. The only durability change I've spotted on the goggle is a bit of stretching/wear to the strap itself, but no fraying or anything of severe concern.

    Photo Credit: Chelsea Curtis

    Last Words

    Dragon definitely killed it in the looks/design department, and I absolutely love the lens quick-release feature they have created for their top of the line NFX2. The quality of these goggles comes with a hefty price, considering most riders have at least a few sets of goggles lying around for their outings to the tracks and trails. For me, these goggles didn’t get a perfect rating mainly because of the cost in such a saturated market. While they were good, there wasn't anything groundbreaking about them outside of the quick-release lens system, which other brands have their own versions of. But even with the lofty price, I'll keep rocking the Dragons.

    Vital MX Rating: 3.5 Stars - Very Good

    High-end goggles bring high-end prices. While I have no major complaints about the NFX2s, the overall price of the goggle and the replacement costs of the lenses are hard to swallow. While it's a great goggle, it's not stand-out enough over models that cost a third of the amount, which is why the rating stands where it does. If you like the style, fit, and features of the goggle, without the pricing being an issue, then I recommend them. Check out DragonAlliance.com for more information, where to buy, and for color options.

    About the Test Rider

    Shelby Paget - is a ginger that has been rockin' two wheels since he was three years old. Growing up riding singletrack and trails in the hills of NorCal with his brother and Dad until he got his first taste of the Motocross Racing scene at 14. He's been hooked ever since! Whether he's working on looking better than he really is for the camera or doing cartwheels down the straights, he's always looking forward to getting back on two wheels whenever he gets the chance. This 5'11", 150 pound ginger will be riding as long as he has a wrist to twist!

    Words by Shelby Paget // Photos by Chelsea Curtis

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    Specifications

    Product Dragon NFX2 Goggles
    Type Goggles
    Features
    Construction
    Colors
    Miscellaneous Swiftlock lens change system. Injection-molded, dual all-weather anti-fog treated lens. Removable noseguard. Includes ten pack of tear-offs and lens shield guard.
    Price $170
    More Info

    Dragon Alliance Website